Switching to iPhone X....... Maybe

Annie_M

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My first Apple Device was one of those tiny iPod shuffles... and quickly after than, I got an iPhone 4. I have never had a Mac Book, and have used iTunes on my PC at work. Since then, I've enjoyed a variety of iPads and iPhones, yet I still don't have a Macbook. My point is, you can do it, if you want. There are alot of valid opinions here. The bottom line is, if you want an iPhone X, try one out. You have 14 days to return it if you decide you don't like it.
 

gnirkatto

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OK, true to some degree. Although there are a growing number of Android One phones out there (e.g. Nokia's 2018 range) which also get quick updates
That’s why I said “many” phones, not all.

On your other points re differences between Android and iOS in security: your “genuine question” was how are Pixel phones different than other Android phones. I tried to answer this particular question.

I will never get into a discussion of whether Android or iOS is more secure, as this is pointless imho, and never leads anywhere. Except into anger and frustration.
 

anon(50597)

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That’s why I said “many” phones, not all.

On your other points re differences between Android and iOS in security: your “genuine question” was how are Pixel phones different than other Android phones. I tried to answer this particular question.

I will never get into a discussion of whether Android or iOS is more secure, as this is pointless imho, and never leads anywhere. Except into anger and frustration.

Well explained and was exactly my point.
In the end the user needs to decide what they want. Security is certainly something that should be considered, to whatever degree the user holds it. I just feel the Apple ecosystem of itself leads to a more secure environment.
 

Closingracer

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I am a long time Android user and the past few months I've been thinking of switching to the iPhone X from the Pixel 2. I've been trying to find and read articles about switching and the differences but some questions I have is it worth going iPhone if you are not in the MAC ecosystem? I don't have a MacBook or any other Apple products. I have Google Home products, Chromebooks, I just bought a new HP Laptop.
Mainly I am worried about not being happy with the switch. Anyone recently have first hand experience switching to iOS after being a long tie Android user?



I have owned both Android and iOS devices and switched multiple times between both. I am a Mac User which makes it easier but tbh at the end of the day iOS and Android is the same thing. An OS which lets you makes phone calls, Text (imessage, SMS, etc), make videos and photos, and lets you use your favorite social media apps and view the internet. The differences is the software which one revolves around 3 buttons ( Back, Home and Recent apps) and the other is a home button or gestures. Once you get used to the ways to getting between apps it is pretty much the same experience.
 

Closingracer

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Pixel phones are an outlier compared to all Android phones.
I’m not here to argue against Android, I used to use it myself, but it is no match for security against Apple overall.

Eh I wouldn't say that. Samsung has been way better doing security updates with my Note gotten every months Security updates up until May since I have since sold my Note 8 so I can't vouch for it any further.


Security updates and OS updates are 2 different things in Android world
 

anon(50597)

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Eh I wouldn't say that. Samsung has been way better doing security updates with my Note gotten every months Security updates up until May since I have since sold my Note 8 so I can't vouch for it any further.


Security updates and OS updates are 2 different things in Android world

I agree that there has been improvement. I am not an Android basher, just pointing out differences I feel are real. I would think, and I’m no IT expert, that being open source lends itself to more problems. Apple is mocked by many as locked down, seems like that may help improve things on the security front though.
 

Quis89

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This. The only reason I would never use android is it’s hackable and can get viruses, not to mention the ads! Friend of mine keeps getting ads on his lock screen....wtf!

That friend of yours isn't being too safe with their phone use. You have to remember that Android a bit more open. It gives the user more freedom on what they can download and install. This can be a bad thing if they aren't practicing safe habits with their device. This notion that Androids are hackable and more prone to virus' is false in this day and age.
 

Quis89

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I agree that there has been improvement. I am not an Android basher, just pointing out differences I feel are real. I would think, and I’m no IT expert, that being open source lends itself to more problems. Apple is mocked by many as locked down, seems like that may help improve things on the security front though.

This is to protect the user from themselves. Apple doesn't trust that you know what you're doing with your phone to keep yourself safe so they implement security measures that will prevent you from doing anything to mess your device up. Android places a little more "faith" in the user in that the user can do quite a bit more on their device. This could lead to issues if the user isn't careful about what they are doing or what they download.

The Play Store also seems to be a bit more lenient on the apps they allow.
 

anon(50597)

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This is to protect the user from themselves. Apple doesn't trust that you know what you're doing with your phone to keep yourself safe so they implement security measures that will prevent you from doing anything to mess your device up. Android places a little more "faith" in the user in that the user can do quite a bit more on their device. This could lead to issues if the user isn't careful about what they are doing or what they download.

The Play Store also seems to be a bit more lenient on the apps they allow.

I’m not sure I entirely believe this. Of course I’m not part of Apple so these are all guesses. I believe they want a tight system with the least amount of issues. It’s not about dumbing down their users. It’s about having an ecosystem you can rely on.
 

Quis89

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I’m not sure I entirely believe this. Of course I’m not part of Apple so these are all guesses. I believe they want a tight system with the least amount of issues. It’s not about dumbing down their users. It’s about having an ecosystem you can rely on.

In what way would your reliance on iOS be lessened if you had a few additional controls over how you can use and customize your device, though? I agree, these are all guesses as none of us work within Apple. But it seems as though Apple implements many safeguards in their products to product the user from themselves. Whether its SIP and Gatekeeper on MacOS or the walled garden approach in iOS. I believe security could be maintained while still giving the user a little bit of pull on what we can and can't do on our devices. For example, the ability to side load applications on iOS requires more teethpulling than necessary. Why can't I just download an .ipk file from anywhere? Why can't I manage my own file system similar to that of Android? What external security risks are posed by this ability? The only risk I can see, is my possibly installing a malicious app or meddling with parts of the file system that could damage my device.
 

anon(50597)

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In what way would your reliance on iOS be lessened if you had a few additional controls over how you can use and customize your device, though? I agree, these are all guesses as none of us work within Apple. But it seems as though Apple implements many safeguards in their products to product the user from themselves. Whether its SIP and Gatekeeper on MacOS or the walled garden approach in iOS. I believe security could be maintained while still giving the user a little bit of pull on what we can and can't do on our devices. For example, the ability to side load applications on iOS requires more teethpulling than necessary. Why can't I just download an .ipk file from anywhere? Why can't I manage my own file system similar to that of Android? What external security risks are posed by this ability? The only risk I can see, is my possibly installing a malicious app or meddling with parts of the file system that could damage my device.

I have no interest in side loading applications and causing potential harm to my device.
I did it on Android, so I get it, but I realize now there is no need. If it was important to me I would have stayed on Android.
Again, I’m not pitching one against the other. They both have their positives and negatives. There is no perfect OS. We must choose which best fits our needs. I’m glad we have choices!
 

rebretz000

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I've decided to wait until the fall. I just seen some rumors of the supposed upcoming iPhone 11's you could call them. I'm liking the idea of having over a 6 inch screen. And with how well Apple did the iPhone X, screen to body ratio, I'm confident it would still be slightly smaller than the current plus line up.
If there is one thing Apple has always been consistent with it's build quality.

And the funny thing I'm only on Android because years ago when my girlfriend, now wife, went to AT&T to sign up for a joint plan and get iPhones the rep refused to do it because we weren't engaged or married. So to get smartphones we had to go to Verizon and sign up for Android phones.
 

nucks26

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I'm also currently on a Pixel 2XL. My last iPhone was a gold iPhone 6. I didn't not enjoy the iPhone 6 I just generally prefer android. However, I miss iMessage sincerely. And, unlike yourself, I own a MacBook Pro as my main laptop, and an iPad Pro for school which I absolutely love. Although I love android I've been very intrigued by the iPhone X. It's a little bit too expensive for me unfortunately.
 

anony_mouse

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Or you don't know anyone with a iPhone and don't need iMessage/Facetime.

I have good news! You don't need iMessage or Facetime to communicate with Apple users. Have you heard of, for example:
- Telephone calls
- SMS
- WhatsApp
- Skype
- Facebook Messenger
- Email

All of these work on iPhones! It's worth checking them out if you know someone who is not an Apple user.
 

anony_mouse

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I would think, and I’m no IT expert, that being open source lends itself to more problems.

I am surprised to see this opinion still appearing in 2018, and even more surprising to see it on an Apple forum. Apple, and the rest of the world, realised that it's not true twenty years ago. Both MacOS and iOS are based on Darwin, which in turn is based on BSD UNIX - all open source operating systems!

Check out: https://opensource.apple.com/
 

anony_mouse

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That’s why I said “many” phones, not all.

On your other points re differences between Android and iOS in security: your “genuine question” was how are Pixel phones different than other Android phones. I tried to answer this particular question.

I will never get into a discussion of whether Android or iOS is more secure, as this is pointless imho, and never leads anywhere. Except into anger and frustration.

I agree with you, and in fact this was my point. Security is about a lot of things, including but not limited to software updates. And even when it comes to software updates, the approaches of iOS and Android and different and it's not as simple as saying one is better than the other.
 

anon(50597)

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I am surprised to see this opinion still appearing in 2018, and even more surprising to see it on an Apple forum. Apple, and the rest of the world, realised that it's not true twenty years ago. Both MacOS and iOS are based on Darwin, which in turn is based on BSD UNIX - all open source operating systems!

Check out: https://opensource.apple.com/

That may be true, I'll take your word for it, but from what I understand ios is locked down much more by Apple.
 

rebretz000

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I have one more question if I may ask it.

Is Apple good with updating last years phone with newer software from this years phone OS? Say if I would get the iPhone X today it can be said that the new iPhone Xs if that's what it is called, wouldn't have any great new feature the iPhone X wouldn't receive?
I know Apple does incremental releases with big changes being made every two years.
I am highly leaning towards moving to iPhones. The Android RCS texting debacle is probably the last straw. I know with iMessage Apple doesn't need to rely on any carriers for it.
Thank you.