Smartphone Unlocking becomes illegal on Jan 26th

3cit

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I'm not going to go with the "it's my phone, I can do what I want with it" argument, cuz I can see how a subsidized phone isn't technically "my own".
However I do question wether the DCMA gives rights to ANYBODY to determine if I can unlock the phone that is solely in my possession.
I don't think anybody will stop offering unlock services, as it is going to be incredibly difficult to prosecute that "crime"
I predict life will go on as usual long after that date passes.
 

jclisenby

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I can see some good regulations and channel checks coming about with this. Carriers could offer unlocks for a price and all the unlock companies online being forced to close. This could get real interesting real quick.
 

3cit

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I can see some good regulations and channel checks coming about with this. Carriers could offer unlocks for a price and all the unlock companies online being forced to close. This could get real interesting real quick.

how are they going to shut them down?
go door to door and ask people if they provide "illegal" unlocking services?
and on whose authority does it become illegal!
the united states government? interpol? google or apple security?
there will be no task forces, no shutdowns, no arrests... this "law" i about as useful as the law that makes it illegal to tie your horse to a fencepost within 15 paces of an open bank
 

jclisenby

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how are they going to shut them down?
go door to door and ask people if they provide "illegal" unlocking services?
and on whose authority does it become illegal!
the united states government? interpol? google or apple security?
there will be no task forces, no shutdowns, no arrests... this "law" i about as useful as the law that makes it illegal to tie your horse to a fencepost within 15 paces of an open bank

It's made illegal under United States law. The FBI and other coordinating agencies are responsible for enforcement. This would be a crime very similar to pirating DVDs. They can easily shut down websites by pulling their servers and sending them a notice.

The carriers are a big part of the lobby that have gotten this practice made illegal. They have a lot of power in Washington and enforcement of the new unlocking laws will be pushed by them.
 

redbeard

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Unlock your phone? Illegal

Launder a billion for drug cartels? Legal

No wonder this country is a joke of it's former self
 

jefftam68

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Rather than do such horrible things to society like unlocking your phone, do the right thing every law abiding citizen does and go buy yourself a shiny new assault rifle with extended capacity clips!
 

3cit

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The FBI can't do a damn thing!
You think members here like unlock streak or anyone else care what U.S. says about unlocking phones
And I'd love to see what AT&T does to a "customer" using t-mobile!
A sternly worded email?
The very second that a carrier tries to push this forward, some advocacy group is going to stand up and fight the legality of the law. Starting with how it was established!
The DCMA does not give anybody the right to create new laws. A phone made by Samsung, apple, Sony, Motorola, htc, etc is not copyright protected media for AT&T or Verizon or sprint or any other service provider.
 

Just_Me_D

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The more I read about it, the more I'm convinces that it is an example of another knee-jerk law to prevent companies that provide unlock codes from making money & probably an attempt to keep T-Mobile from gaining too many customers.
 

Garz

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The more I read about it, the more I'm convinces that it is an example of another knee-jerk law to prevent companies that provide unlock codes from making money & probably an attempt to keep T-Mobile from gaining too many customers.

I don't think it's going to prevent much. Unlockers are still unlocking today.