1. BlazingGold's Avatar
    So like I'm sure many of us do, I usually set my phone to charge while I sleep to wake with it at 100%. A battery app I have recommends charging it about an additional 30-45 min following a complete charge and then unplugging it, as it can be bad for the battery. I know overcharging certain things such as a laptop is REALLY a bad for the battery. Same for auto GPS units. Is this really bad for phones as well?
    10-18-2014 01:38 AM
  2. SMELTN's Avatar
    I am interested in knowing as well. I always have charged mine at night.
    10-18-2014 01:55 AM
  3. martinlmnt's Avatar
    As far as I was aware (and correct me if I'm wrong) but once the phone is fully charged it stops and just trickle charges to keep it topped off - as long as it's not connected to the charger 24/7 I believe you should be okay.

    That's what I've been told anyway.
    10-18-2014 03:53 AM
  4. WhiteiPadMini's Avatar
    I just charge mine overnight and have it 100% in the morning.

    AFAIK, the post above me is correct.
    10-18-2014 07:27 AM
  5. kataran's Avatar
    Yes most devices these day are what I call smart charge. There designed to not over charge
    10-18-2014 07:47 AM
  6. SprSynJn's Avatar
    As far as I was aware (and correct me if I'm wrong) but once the phone is fully charged it stops and just trickle charges to keep it topped off - as long as it's not connected to the charger 24/7 I believe you should be okay.

    That's what I've been told anyway.
    See this is what I had always thought. Hope its correct because its what I have been doing this entire time.
    10-18-2014 07:55 AM
  7. BlazingGold's Avatar
    The app "battery doctor" says that it trickle charges for maybe 30-45 min after a charge. After that, supposedly it is bad for the battery
    Andrew Laffey likes this.
    10-18-2014 09:21 AM
  8. HankAZ's Avatar
    While some app says it’s bad for the battery, I have over 5 years of actual use proof. I have always charged my battery overnight. That means it’s on the charger for a minimum of 5-6 hours every night, and sometimes as much as 8 hours. I have always had good to great battery life on every iPhone I’ve ever owned.

    Have you ever had your phone on the charger and it shows 100%, but as soon as you remove it from the charger, the meter drops to 97-98%? That’s because of the way the charging process works. When the battery charge reaches 100%, the charge process stops, and the battery may begin to lose charge. Once the charge level drops to around 95%, the charger starts the trickle charge until it reaches 100% again. Then the process repeats. This is to protect the battery from being overcharged.

    Overcharging not an issue, VP says

    Apple's VP for iPad product marketing, Michael Tchao, has responded to recent controversy surrounding the way the third-gen device handles charging. The executive tells AllThingsD that an iPad does indeed report 100 percent charge before it's actually finished, but that overcharging is not an issue. Once an iPad genuinely hits the 100 percent mark, it will discharge slightly and then recharge, repeating the cycle until the charge cable is disconnected.

    "That circuitry is designed so you can keep your device plugged in as long as you would like," says Tchao. "It's a great feature that's always been in iOS." He also insists that iPad users can always expect a 10 hour maximum, and that the behavior of the battery indicator was designed to avoid distracting or confusing people; a completely accurate battery monitor would show levels constantly rising and falling after a certain stage.

    Read more: Apple's Michael Tchao clarifies iPad battery charging issue | Electronista
    Technically, what your app says may be true, but my experience tells me that it’s overkill and/or poppycock.
    10-18-2014 10:41 AM
  9. BlazingGold's Avatar
    Awesome info Hank! Thank you. One thing I found weird (just with the 6+ though it seems) is that after charging, it usually takes nearly 2 hours for my battery to drop just to 90%. However, from there, it usually drops all other 10% increments in only 30 minutes to 1 hour. Do you know why this is ?
    10-18-2014 04:48 PM
  10. tekjunkie28's Avatar
    Many of you are correct. After 80% or so the device decreases the mA and speed at which the battery is charging. That in inherent of any Li Ion poly battery. These batteries do not like heat or to be charged over 80%. The more time the battery spends above 80% or below 20% puts stress on the battery. You can expect the battery to remain at a decently useable life, while being charged to 100% every night, to last about 540 charges before its overall capacity begins to decline.

    One thing I want to know is if iOS takes that into account or not? My wife had a 4s for almost 2 years. I used it and it would still get about 5 hours usage time and that was just using it for a week while I was waiting for my 6+ to come into stock.
    10-19-2014 06:38 PM
  11. tekjunkie28's Avatar
    Awesome info Hank! Thank you. One thing I found weird (just with the 6+ though it seems) is that after charging, it usually takes nearly 2 hours for my battery to drop just to 90%. However, from there, it usually drops all other 10% increments in only 30 minutes to 1 hour. Do you know why this is ?
    I have noticed this on every iPhone I've ever owned.
    10-19-2014 06:39 PM
  12. PeltFrelken's Avatar
    Like others have said. I think the batteries these days are smart. They are designed to be efficient no matter how long you charge, and also at what percentage you start charging back up again. I top off my phone all the time with my car charger, even if I'm almost at 100%.
    10-19-2014 07:23 PM
  13. Lesawags's Avatar
    What I find interesting is sometimes my battery stays at like 100% for almost 2 hours.. Granted that was only with like 39 mins usage at that point, but gotta love the battery life
    10-19-2014 09:16 PM
  14. iJuan's Avatar
    I just charge mine overnight and I leave it plugged in even in the morning when I wake up and use it while getting ready for work
    mumfoau likes this.
    10-20-2014 01:49 AM
  15. phlamethrowre's Avatar
    Like others have said. I think the batteries these days are smart. They are designed to be efficient no matter how long you charge, and also at what percentage you start charging back up again. I top off my phone all the time with my car charger, even if I'm almost at 100%.
    Me too. This is what keeps a battery healthy. Lith-ion batteries last much longer is you do not let them discharge and then recharge if possible. I keep mine topped off all day most of the time.
    10-20-2014 07:53 AM
  16. Nanci's Avatar
    Me too. This is what keeps a battery healthy. Lith-ion batteries last much longer is you do not let them discharge and then recharge if possible. I keep mine topped off all day most of the time.
    So it it healthier for my battery to be topped off at work, whenever I have the chance, even though it will easily last the whole day?
    10-20-2014 08:12 AM
  17. phlamethrowre's Avatar
    So it it healthier for my battery to be topped off at work, whenever I have the chance, even though it will easily last the whole day?
    Yes, a battery has a certain amount of cycles in it. Every time you run it down and charge it up it uses a cycle. It is widely accepted that keeping these newer batteries topped off prolongs their usable life.
    10-20-2014 08:19 AM
  18. HankAZ's Avatar
    Yes, a battery has a certain amount of cycles in it. Every time you run it down and charge it up it uses a cycle. It is widely accepted that keeping these newer batteries topped off prolongs their usable life.
    The partial charge cycles are cumulative. So charging up 10% ten times would equate to one charge cycle.
    10-20-2014 09:22 AM
  19. phlamethrowre's Avatar
    The partial charge cycles are cumulative. So charging up 10% ten times would equate to one charge cycle.
    Can I get a link to your source on that?
    10-20-2014 11:55 AM
  20. HankAZ's Avatar
    The partial charge cycles are cumulative. So charging up 10% ten times would equate to one charge cycle.
    Can I get a link to your source on that?
    Apple (United Kingdom) - Batteries

    A charge cycle means using all the battery's power, but that doesn't necessarily mean a single charge. For instance, you could listen to your iPod for a few hours one day, using half its power, and then recharge it fully. If you did the same thing the next day, it would count as one charge cycle, not two, so you may take several days to complete a cycle. Each time you complete a charge cycle, it diminishes battery capacity slightly, but you can put notebook, iPod and iPhone batteries through many charge cycles before they will only hold 80 per cent of original battery capacity.
    mumfoau likes this.
    10-20-2014 12:11 PM
  21. InTheRed's Avatar
    Personally I keep my iPhone plugged into the wall all the time I am near one. When I am in the office it is plugged in. When I am at home most of the time it is plugged in. I figure why use battery life when you don't need to? The 6 Plus has an awesome battery. Last night I ran it down to `0% running on battery most of the day. I forgot to plug it in when I went to bed and woke up with the battery at 6%. It took about 2-3 hours to get a full charge. The iPhone 4S would take about 2 hours for the full charge but only had 1/2 the battery that the 6 Plus has.
    10-20-2014 12:21 PM
  22. phlamethrowre's Avatar
    Personally I keep my iPhone plugged into the wall all the time I am near one. When I am in the office it is plugged in. When I am at home most of the time it is plugged in. I figure why use battery life when you don't need to? The 6 Plus has an awesome battery. Last night I ran it down to `0% running on battery most of the day. I forgot to plug it in when I went to bed and woke up with the battery at 6%. It took about 2-3 hours to get a full charge. The iPhone 4S would take about 2 hours for the full charge but only had 1/2 the battery that the 6 Plus has.
    That's pretty much how I do it. I only run it down to 0 about once month in order to recalibrate the battery meter.
    10-20-2014 02:15 PM
  23. HofstraJet's Avatar
    My experience watching my USB meter confirms this - when the battery is relatively full (maybe above 60%-70%), the device charges slowly (under 0.5 A). However, when the battery is low, the 6+ pulls all it can (sometimes up to 2 A). Once charged, it draws 0.1 - 0.2 A.
    10-20-2014 05:57 PM
  24. Zafla's Avatar
    My normal routine is to wait til it's at about 1% before putting it on charge. Once or twice a month, I'll let it die completely before putting it on the charger. If I know I'll be out for a while or using it a lot, I'll charge it just to how much I think I'll need. Is this a good practice or do you think it messes with my battery?
    10-21-2014 07:01 PM
  25. Andrew Laffey's Avatar
    As far as I was aware (and correct me if I'm wrong) but once the phone is fully charged it stops and just trickle charges to keep it topped off - as long as it's not connected to the charger 24/7 I believe you should be okay.

    That's what I've been told anyway.
    11-03-2015 12:46 AM
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