1. Almeuit's Avatar
    As others said no. If Jailbroken then maybe but Apple always has it take over the whole screen for a call.
    01-16-2018 08:21 AM
  2. Carraser23's Avatar
    I think we’re losing the true definition of a phone. No matter how our phone has evolved over the years adding so many features, it’s still a phone and the main function of this device is to make and receive a phone calls. If you take that away, this device should not be called a phone anymore. On an iPad, your call will come as a banner and you can simply swipe that away and ignore it and that make sense because it’s not a phone.
    Hmm never thought of it that way
    01-16-2018 05:15 PM
  3. RobertP1's Avatar
    With all do respect, I disagree. Many people no longer have a “land line” and their cellphone is their primary phone.
    I agree, I fully use my phone as a phone!!
    01-16-2018 06:00 PM
  4. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    With all do respect, I disagree. Many people no longer have a “land line” and their cellphone is their primary phone.
    Who was your disagreement with?
    01-18-2018 10:54 AM
  5. Annie_8plus's Avatar
    Who was your disagreement with?
    I disagreed with TylerLV76 who stated that "Unfortunately these phones are rarely used for calls anymore. Its too easy to handle communication other than making an actual call. Truth be told, calls are the most annoying aspect of phones nowadays."
    01-18-2018 11:11 AM
  6. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    I disagreed with TylerLV76 who stated that "Unfortunately these phones are rarely used for calls anymore. Its too easy to handle communication other than making an actual call. Truth be told, calls are the most annoying aspect of phones nowadays."
    Gotcha.
    Annie_8plus likes this.
    01-18-2018 11:21 AM
  7. TylerLV76's Avatar
    I disagreed with TylerLV76 who stated that "Unfortunately these phones are rarely used for calls anymore. Its too easy to handle communication other than making an actual call. Truth be told, calls are the most annoying aspect of phones nowadays."
    I havent had a landline in 10 years. Besides business, I dont think I actually call anyone except a doctor or dentist. Even my parents who are in their 70's dont call. They converted to texting years ago.

    The drop in calling is why carriers stopped limiting minutes and started limiting data usage.
    01-18-2018 01:30 PM
  8. Annie_8plus's Avatar
    I havent had a landline in 10 years. Besides business, I dont think I actually call anyone except a doctor or dentist. Even my parents who are in their 70's dont call. They converted to texting years ago.

    The drop in calling is why carriers stopped limiting minutes and started limiting data usage.
    I am sure there are those who don't use their phone on their iPhones. And, in that case, wouldn't an iPod Touch be better suited? The only thing that you couldn't do was to text, unless, of course you were connected to WiFi! Another option that might work for you is to go into settings and turn off Cellular when you don't want to be bothered! Just a thought!
    01-18-2018 01:38 PM
  9. TylerLV76's Avatar
    I am sure there are those who don't use their phone on their iPhones. And, in that case, wouldn't an iPod Touch be better suited? The only thing that you couldn't do was to text, unless, of course you were connected to WiFi! Another option that might work for you is to go into settings and turn off Cellular when you don't want to be bothered! Just a thought!
    Unfortunately I own a business that I tend to 24/7. Its not uncommon to receive calls from Japan at 4am. Its not about being bothered by the call, its about the call not taking over what Im currently doing such as email, taking a picture etc. A banner option would allow both things to coexist.

    Texting has become the primary means of communication in the US. Last report I saw said almost 70% of communication was done via text so cell service is extremely important to have on since not all text can come through over wifi.

    Ive come to terms that its not an option, hopefully one day it will be like it is on iPad.
    01-18-2018 01:44 PM
  10. RobertP1's Avatar
    I see that texting is the most popular way of communicating these days, but I also see texting threads that are 20 messages long that could have been handled with a 30 second phone call. It is very hard to convey tone via text. I still would prefer a call... but I am an old fart... and my kids text!! so therefore, so do I
    Annie_8plus likes this.
    01-19-2018 07:31 AM
  11. SprSynJn's Avatar


    So I see in the screenshot I’ve attached that there are a few options pertaining to what people are asking about. Do any of the options shown not allow what is being requested? I’ve yet to test it myself, but I can’t see why it wouldn’t allow it.
    01-19-2018 07:47 AM
  12. TylerLV76's Avatar
    https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/201...1a81b694b6.jpg

    So I see in the screenshot I’ve attached that there are a few options pertaining to what people are asking about. Do any of the options shown not allow what is being requested? I’ve yet to test it myself, but I can’t see why it wouldn’t allow it.
    Unfortunately it doesnt. Im not really sure what the banners represent unless its a missed call notification or voicemail maybe.
    01-19-2018 07:55 AM
  13. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    I see that texting is the most popular way of communicating these days, but I also see texting threads that are 20 messages long that could have been handled with a 30 second phone call. It is very hard to convey tone via text. I still would prefer a call... but I am an old fart... and my kids text!! so therefore, so do I
    For me the text threads are a point of reference and are still more convenient than a phone call. My bookie had a wrong total for me the other day and I was able to scroll all the way back to March of 2017 to find the mistake. No way I could have referenced that with a phone call.
    RobertP1 and Annie_8plus like this.
    01-19-2018 08:42 AM
  14. RobertP1's Avatar
    texting is great for a transfer of information.. not so much for a conversation
    Annie_8plus likes this.
    01-21-2018 08:28 AM
  15. qbnkelt's Avatar
    If the call still shows up without taking over what your doing its still a phone, just not an invasive phone when unwanted spam calls come through.

    Unfortunately these phones are rarely used for calls anymore. Its too easy to handle communication other than making an actual call. Truth be told, calls are the most annoying aspect of phones nowadays.
    Not at all. I use my work phone all day for calls. Just got off one now. My voice usage, before I turned in WiFi calling, was so high that I got a slap in the hand for not having turned on WiFi calling sooner. We telework four days a week, and all teleconferences of course use the phone.
    02-01-2018 10:10 AM
  16. TylerLV76's Avatar
    Not at all. I use my work phone all day for calls. Just got off one now. My voice usage, before I turned in WiFi calling, was so high that I got a slap in the hand for not having turned on WiFi calling sooner. We telework five days a week, and all teleconferences of course use the phone.
    And according to recent studies, you are in the minority.

    A couple samples:
    Even weirder is the fact that 37% of people use their smartphones primarily for making actual phone calls
    In total, Americans spend about 26 minutes a day texting. That compares to spending about six minutes a day on voice calls.
    No matter how you use the phone, a call banner would not affect that feature.
    02-01-2018 10:18 AM
  17. qbnkelt's Avatar
    And according to recent studies, you are in the minority.

    A couple samples:




    No matter how you use the phone, a call banner would not affect that feature.
    Except that teleworking, for people who are not self employed, is on the increase globally. And the phone call is ubiquitous in that population.


    http://globalworkplaceanalytics.com/...ing-statistics

    https://facilityexecutive.com/2017/0...ng-trends/amp/
    02-01-2018 10:24 AM
  18. TylerLV76's Avatar
    Except that teleworking, for people who are not self employed, is on the increase globally. And the phone call is ubiquitous in that population.


    Latest Telecommuting Statistics – Global Workplace Analytics

    https://facilityexecutive.com/2017/0...ng-trends/amp/
    From those links..

    50% of the US workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least partial telework and approximately 20-25% of the workforce teleworks at some frequency
    Again, the minority.
    02-01-2018 10:29 AM
  19. qbnkelt's Avatar
    From those links..



    Again, the minority.

    Please read.

    Summary of trends:
    Regular work-at-home, among the non-self-employed population, has grown by 115% since 2005, nearly 10x faster than the rest of the workforce.
    3.7 million employees (2.8% of the workforce) now work from home at least half the time.
    The employee population as a whole grew by 1.9% from 2013 to 2014, while employees who telecommuter population grew 5.6%.
    Forty percent more U.S. employers offered flexible workplace options than they did five years ago. Still, only 7% make it available to most of their employees.
    Larger companies are most likely to offer telecommuting options to most of their employees.
    New England and Mid-Atlantic region employers are the most likely to offer telecommuting options.
    Full-time employees are four times more likely to have work-at-home options than part-time workers.
    Non-union workers are twice as likely to have access to telecommuting, but union employee access is growing rapidly.
    02-01-2018 10:32 AM
  20. TylerLV76's Avatar
    Please read.

    Summary of trends:
    Regular work-at-home, among the non-self-employed population, has grown by 115% since 2005, nearly 10x faster than the rest of the workforce.
    3.7 million employees (2.8% of the workforce) now work from home at least half the time.
    The employee population as a whole grew by 1.9% from 2013 to 2014, while employees who telecommuter population grew 5.6%.
    Forty percent more U.S. employers offered flexible workplace options than they did five years ago. Still, only 7% make it available to most of their employees.
    Larger companies are most likely to offer telecommuting options to most of their employees.
    New England and Mid-Atlantic region employers are the most likely to offer telecommuting options.
    Full-time employees are four times more likely to have work-at-home options than part-time workers.
    Non-union workers are twice as likely to have access to telecommuting, but union employee access is growing rapidly.

    Again, the minority.
    02-01-2018 10:34 AM
  21. qbnkelt's Avatar
    OK. You can choose to ignore it.

    Government agencies in DC are increasingly going to telecommuting. This is a trend that is on the upswing.
    We no longer have offices, we have hoteling arrangements and work from home eight days out of a full two week work period. And the trend is rising.

    Google, for example, uses hoteling and an open work space. I mentioned government in DC. Agencies outside of DC actually led the move towards teleworking. In California, in the L. A. area, agencies led the move to telecommute.

    Choose to believe what you like. But phone calls in a work environment will continue especially with the trend towards telework.
    02-01-2018 10:38 AM
  22. TylerLV76's Avatar
    Heres a breakdown of some texting statistics that are shocking.

    https://www.textrequest.com/blog/tex...wer-questions/

    I use my phone a ton for calls, but not because I choose to. I still understand however that I am in the minority of users in this regard. Communications has shifted from voice calls to texting and other forms of communication rapidly and continues to grow at a staggering number.
    02-01-2018 10:40 AM
  23. TylerLV76's Avatar
    OK. You can choose to ignore it.

    Government agencies in DC are increasingly going to telecommuting. This is a trend that is on the upswing.
    We no longer have offices, we have hoteling arrangements and work from home eight days out of a full two week work period. And the trend is rising.

    Google, for example, uses hoteling and an open work space. I mentioned government in DC. Agencies outside of DC actually led the move towards teleworking. In California, in the L. A. area, agencies led the move to telecommute.

    Choose to believe what you like. But phone calls in a work environment will continue especially with the trend towards telework.
    They can continue to trend but it doesnt change the fact that even your stats support the claim that those who use voice calls regularly vs those who dont are in the minority. Its not believing what I want, its facts. Facts that you provided.

    And again, it doesnt change that ability by implementing a call banner like the one on ipads.
    02-01-2018 10:42 AM
  24. qbnkelt's Avatar
    They can continue to trend but it doesnt change the fact that even your stats support the claim that those who use voice calls regularly vs those who dont are in the minority. Its not believing what I want, its facts. Facts that you provided.
    Let’s discuss this.

    Trend for telework is increasing.
    For those employees who do not work in the office, there is a need to communicate with those who are in the office. They are provided with phones to accomplish this. Often there is a need for teleconferences, and while Connect and GotoMeeting are useful, they are primarily used when there is screen sharing. For other times the phone is used.
    In addition, even without teleconferences, there is a need to speak to someone using....a phone. Since one party is in the office and the other isn’t, a desktop isn’t a viable option leaving the work provided mobile as the only viable option. So a call is used.
    A trend is not a static measurement. It is a movement. Therefore it either increases or decreases but by definition once you speak of trend you speak of movement. Which means that the total usage of mobile for telework employees is rising.
    Mobiles used to be a status thing. Only executives got them. Not anymore. Rank and file employees who are now increasingly working from home get 1) a laptop and 2) either an iPhone or a Samsung.
    And they use the phone as a phone. For calls.
    02-01-2018 10:53 AM
  25. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Heres a breakdown of some texting statistics that are shocking.

    https://www.textrequest.com/blog/tex...wer-questions/

    I use my phone a ton for calls, but not because I choose to. I still understand however that I am in the minority of users in this regard. Communications has shifted from voice calls to texting and other forms of communication rapidly and continues to grow at a staggering number.
    Of course people text. Nobody is saying otherwise. For my personal use it’s 50/50. But for work, it’s 95/5 in favor of calls. You can’t teleconference via text.
    02-01-2018 10:56 AM
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