1. Speedygi's Avatar
    Shouldn't we be able to do whatever we want on them, including jail breaking or making mods to the hardware? I don't see how Apple can restrict our usage of the phone then, it's incredibly odd.

    That includes installing back versions of iOS...

    Any thoughts?
    10-13-2013 09:18 PM
  2. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    Apple doesn't prevent you from jail breaking. It just voids your warranty if you need to take it in for service.
    Apple doesn't prevent physical mods. People have been doing things like Anostyle or changing the back plate to a clear cover since there have been iPhones. Again, It just voids your warranty.
    If you want to discuss downgrading the OS, there's already another thread about this.
    10-13-2013 09:24 PM
  3. kristopherlarry's Avatar
    Apple doesn't prevent you from jail breaking. It just voids your warranty if you need to take it in for service.
    Apple doesn't prevent physical mods. People have been doing things like Anostyle or changing the back plate to a clear cover since there have been iPhones. Again, It just voids your warranty.
    If you want to discuss downgrading the OS, there's already another thread about this.
    Exactly... Just Falls To Warranty... You Over Clock Ur Phone & Some How Damage Ur Phone... Apple Is Saying That's On U, Not Them & Thus Going To Make U Find Ur Own Way Of Paying/Replacing Ur Mistake...


    Sent From The State Of Ohio...
    Alik Malix likes this.
    10-13-2013 09:27 PM
  4. Speedygi's Avatar
    Exactly... Just Falls To Warranty... You Over Clock Ur Phone & Some How Damage Ur Phone... Apple Is Saying That's On U, Not Them & Thus Going To Make U Find Ur Own Way Of Paying/Replacing Ur Mistake...


    Sent From The State Of Ohio...
    Yup, I think that's plenty fair...
    10-13-2013 09:30 PM
  5. taz323's Avatar
    When I came over to Apple I knew what I was getting into. My idevices work and work well.when I make a call I know it's gonna go threw or I need to surf something, no issues. I get back every penny without hassle . No I have no need to argue with that.
    10-13-2013 09:31 PM
  6. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    Modify the hardware? lol...like all the modifications people are making to all the other smart phones on the market? What hardware modifications do you want to do to the iPhone that are common place modifications found in the Samsung, Nokia, Blackberry or HTC worlds?

    As far as software goes (mainly, jailbreaking), the only thing stopping you is getting around the code in order to properly jailbreak the device...the same things have to be done with devices running Android OS...is it easier to do it there? Yup, but it's not like the iPhone is completely shut out either, it's just a little more tedious (which is why it takes a little longer to get the jailbreak out).

    There's nothing odd about it...they are trying to provide a smooth and optimal OS experience, that doesn't come with allowing people to just do as they please with it, it has safe guards for a reason, and it's what attracts many people to the iPhone in the first place (as well as Mac OSX for that matter).

    Keep in mind that the niche of people like you, who want all this access and ability with these things is VERY small compared to the rest of the market that buys the phones.
    Just_Me_D and john_v like this.
    10-13-2013 09:32 PM
  7. Fausty82's Avatar
    Apple doesn't prevent you from jail breaking. It just voids your warranty if you need to take it in for service.
    Apple doesn't prevent physical mods. People have been doing things like Anostyle or changing the back plate to a clear cover since there have been iPhones. Again, It just voids your warranty.
    If you want to discuss downgrading the OS, there's already another thread about this.
    Actually, jailbreaking doesn’t void your warranty. Depending on what the issue is, Apple may require you to remove the jailbreak and demonstrate for them that the issue happens without the jailbreak, but if it’s a legit issue, they will still warranty the iPhone. They also will not help you do the jailbreak. But if you can remote the jailbreak, Apple will honor your warranty.
    10-13-2013 09:43 PM
  8. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    Actually, jailbreaking doesnt void your warranty. Depending on what the issue is, Apple may require you to remove the jailbreak and demonstrate for them that the issue happens without the jailbreak, but if its a legit issue, they will still warranty the iPhone. They also will not help you do the jailbreak. But if you can remote the jailbreak, Apple will honor your warranty.
    Details, details ;-P
    Fausty82 likes this.
    10-13-2013 10:08 PM
  9. Trees's Avatar
    Shouldn't we be able to do whatever we want on them, including jail breaking or making mods to the hardware? I don't see how Apple can restrict our usage of the phone then, it's incredibly odd.

    That includes installing back versions of iOS...

    Any thoughts?
    Apple may not help if hardware gets modded to an extent like this
    10-13-2013 10:39 PM
  10. abazigal's Avatar
    You can. It doesn't mean apple has to make it easy for you.
    jmr1015 likes this.
    10-13-2013 10:44 PM
  11. Speedygi's Avatar
    Modify the hardware? lol...like all the modifications people are making to all the other smart phones on the market? What hardware modifications do you want to do to the iPhone that are common place modifications found in the Samsung, Nokia, Blackberry or HTC worlds?

    As far as software goes (mainly, jailbreaking), the only thing stopping you is getting around the code in order to properly jailbreak the device...the same things have to be done with devices running Android OS...is it easier to do it there? Yup, but it's not like the iPhone is completely shut out either, it's just a little more tedious (which is why it takes a little longer to get the jailbreak out).

    There's nothing odd about it...they are trying to provide a smooth and optimal OS experience, that doesn't come with allowing people to just do as they please with it, it has safe guards for a reason, and it's what attracts many people to the iPhone in the first place (as well as Mac OSX for that matter).

    Keep in mind that the niche of people like you, who want all this access and ability with these things is VERY small compared to the rest of the market that buys the phones.
    Ensuring there is a smooth and optimal OS experience means restricting the things you can do with the internals, is that what you essentially meant?
    10-14-2013 01:38 AM
  12. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    Ensuring there is a smooth and optimal OS experience means restricting the things you can do with the internals, is that what you essentially meant?
    Not at all...I never correlated hardware with software in my post. What I asked is you to explain to me what modifications you want to do on the iPhone that you find being done on other devices, and what other devices allow on their hardware (as far as modifications go) that differ so much from the iPhone. (I was also being a bit sarcastic because I already know the answer to the question, but I wanted to see what, exactly, you were talking about).
    10-14-2013 10:38 AM
  13. natasftw's Avatar
    During an impromptu interview with Apple engineers, I used the "do you have any questions?" time to ask for some input as to why jailbreaking wasn't supported in an attempt to lure another group of users to the device. My point was Apple could include a button that was somewhat difficult to click that included a warning letting the user know they'd no longer be eligible to receive customer service for many of their issues as the apps they'd install wouldn't be screened in a way that would make training customer service reps a reasonable task.

    His response was the most legitimate response I've heard so far. Apple charges a premium for the "Apple experience." They market on this. Many people see something they want and go after it, without thinking about the consequences. While tech users are likely in a position to make an educated decision, many others would go through the supported jailbreak purely because they liked the way a theme looked. If something were to go wrong with their phone, they'd still blame Apple. This becomes bad word of mouth advertising and counters the marketing they've invested millions into. It's easier for them to let tech users find their own way into a jailbreak as this creates a mental split between the jailbroken phone and one within the Apple experience.
    Speedygi likes this.
    10-14-2013 11:16 AM
  14. Speedygi's Avatar
    Not at all...I never correlated hardware with software in my post. What I asked is you to explain to me what modifications you want to do on the iPhone that you find being done on other devices, and what other devices allow on their hardware (as far as modifications go) that differ so much from the iPhone. (I was also being a bit sarcastic because I already know the answer to the question, but I wanted to see what, exactly, you were talking about).
    I meant things you could modify on a rooted Android phone, something like overclocking.
    10-14-2013 12:15 PM
  15. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    I meant things you could modify on a rooted Android phone, something like overclocking.
    But rooting is software, not hardware, and is no different than jail breaking an iOS device. And not supported by the various Android manufacturers just like jail breaking isn't supported by Apple.
    jmr1015 likes this.
    10-14-2013 12:35 PM
  16. SwitchBeach's Avatar
    Also, you buy the hardware. But you don't "buy" the software. You license the software. And as such, you are bound to the terms of that license.
    jmr1015 and Fausty82 like this.
    10-14-2013 12:39 PM
  17. BlackBerry Guy's Avatar
    You pay for a device, you can do whatever you want to it. It doesn't mean that the OEMs are in any way obligated make it easy for you though. I don't think any of them actually encourages jailbreaking/rooting.
    10-14-2013 02:57 PM
  18. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    I meant things you could modify on a rooted Android phone, something like overclocking.
    So you have a confusion of what exactly hardware and software is. That's ok, but your initial rant reflected a modification to "hardware", and I thought that was hilarious since nobody modifies hardware on smart phones (on any regular basis), regardless of what phone you're talking about.

    As far as software is concerned, you're perfectly capable of modifying the iPhone's OS, you just have to jailbreak it...so your argument is a bit invalid, since every phone manufacturer on the market takes steps to prevent customization to their original OS release, even Android, who may not take as many steps to prevent such, but still do not allow a native process to doing such. Android phones require a similar work around compared to a "jailbreak", just termed differently.

    So I guess I'm confused as to the point of this thread...the iPhone/iOS can be customized, and you were confused about what "hardware" meant, so...what is your argument?
    10-14-2013 03:00 PM
  19. Speedygi's Avatar
    Okay, maybe I referred to the degree at which the iPhone can be customized from jailbreaking compared to, say, rooting on a Android phone and doing customizations at that level. Apple doesn't condone jailbreaking at a philosophical level whereas rooting is part of the norm for Android, because Android is more 'open' with rooting and numerous workarounds like sideloading APKs.
    10-14-2013 09:13 PM
  20. Speedygi's Avatar
    You pay for a device, you can do whatever you want to it. It doesn't mean that the OEMs are in any way obligated make it easy for you though. I don't think any of them actually encourages jailbreaking/rooting.
    But one could argue that Android is structured better to 'accomodate' customizations? Due to its open source nature.
    10-14-2013 09:14 PM
  21. jmr1015's Avatar
    Okay, maybe I referred to the degree at which the iPhone can be customized from jailbreaking compared to, say, rooting on a Android phone and doing customizations at that level. Apple doesn't condone jailbreaking at a philosophical level whereas rooting is part of the norm for Android, because Android is more 'open' with rooting and numerous workarounds like sideloading APKs.
    Google may condone rooting of their Android OS, because they don't manufacturer the hardware it is being done on. But the individual device manufacturers, like Samsung, will usually void your warranty if you root their device... as will most mobile carriers.
    Speedygi likes this.
    10-14-2013 10:04 PM
  22. Chris Parsons's Avatar
    Google may condone rooting of their Android OS, because they don't manufacturer the hardware it is being done on. But the individual device manufacturers, like Samsung, will usually void your warranty if you root their device... as will most mobile carriers.
    Only if you're dumb enough to tell them or not clean up after yourself...

    No doubt, there is times I wish Apple would let up on some of their control but I get over it. It prevents dumb people from doing dumb things and those who are smart enough to handle it, usually find a way (Jalbreaks) or go on to something that's a little more fitting (Android) to what they want out of their devices.
    Speedygi likes this.
    10-14-2013 10:08 PM
  23. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    Okay, maybe I referred to the degree at which the iPhone can be customized from jailbreaking compared to, say, rooting on a Android phone and doing customizations at that level. Apple doesn't condone jailbreaking at a philosophical level whereas rooting is part of the norm for Android, because Android is more 'open' with rooting and numerous workarounds like sideloading APKs.
    Being a bit over dramatic aren't we with the "philosophical" comment? Of course Apple is against jailbreaking...they are offering you both an OS and the hardware that runs it. They are offering you the entire package. Google develops an OS known for fragmentation...so why wouldn't they support people customizing it for better use on the premiere devices? Apple optimizes their OS for one device...the iPhone. It's developed to run optimally on the iPhone, and optimized use of the native features found on the iPhone. Essentially, when you buy the iPhone, you don't need to modify the OS for it to run perfectly as intended (this is a major difference with the Android OS, which many times almost SCREAMS for a root and work arounds in order to be optimized for the upper tier devices running the OS).

    Also, try getting warranty work on a Galaxy S that has been rooted and gets bricked in some way or another because of such. Good luck with that! LOL! (ask my buddy, an Android developer, what he was told when he tried to get warranty work on his Note 2 and they sent it back to him with a denial of service unless he paid because of the modifications made to the system).

    And in the end...jailbreaking is still fully possible. So what's the argument here? That you disagree with Apple's stance on modifying their OS? Who cares? LOL! Have you ever driven your car fast? Accelerated quickly? Did you know that car manufacturers don't like it when you drive your car hard? Ask the owner's of the first generation Nissan GTR what their experience was with Nissan when they brought their cars in for service after a track day...then ask them how much sh*t they give about what Nissan thinks about their activities, lol. It's a corporation, not your best friend...who cares? I couldn't care less what Apple thinks about what I do with my iPhone.

    As far as the degree in which an iPhone can be customized from JB'ing vs. rooting an Android device...I can answer this question quite easily...after JB'ing an iPhone, I can turn my iPhone INTO an android device, so the customization possibilities are quite literally ENDLESS.
    Speedygi likes this.
    10-14-2013 10:17 PM
  24. BlackBerry Guy's Avatar
    But one could argue that Android is structured better to 'accomodate' customizations? Due to its open source nature.
    Android as an OS is all about customization. In stock form you can install any number of widgets, move and place your icons wherever you want, install 3rd party launchers etc. All this without any need to root.

    It being open sourced has spawned a whole community of users like the guys at CyanogenMod, who deal in custom roms. I suppose one might say having an open source OS would appeal to the tinkerers out there.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
    Last edited by BlackBerry Guy; 10-14-2013 at 10:38 PM.
    Speedygi likes this.
    10-14-2013 10:23 PM
  25. Alex_Hong's Avatar
    The way I see it, when someone decides to buy an iPhone, they have to already know Apple's views on jailbreak, modifying, etc.

    They have had the same stance for long enough, that those who do tinker with their iPhones, know what they are getting themselves into. And the average consumer might decide against doing modification for fear of killing the device. Its a system that I think works well enough.

    Though I'm sure that there are users who likes tinkering no matter what platform they are on. So I'm glad that the option is there as well. Of course at the cost of voiding warranties.

    Apple's wish to control the experience is understandable since as mentioned above, no matter what, users will blame apple if something goes wrong. And being in control minimises the chances of that.

    Sent from my GT-N7000 using Tapatalk
    10-15-2013 05:18 PM
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