1. iRy757's Avatar
    I work for Verizon, my mother has had Verizon since 96, they were my first cell phone provider, and I can say that when they start taking off unlimited data, I will never purchase a device from Verizon again.


    Sent from space using Tapatalk
    General Tso likes this.
    05-17-2012 02:37 AM
  2. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    Forgive my mis-inderstanding here but if someone could just clarify a bit for me - so, in my household we hae 4 iphones(2 4's & 2 4S's) and 1 droid. 1 of the iphone 4S's is on a 2gb plan so rule that one out ATM.
    But for the rest of us on the unltd data plan on 3G - am i understanding correctly that because -

    1) we are on 3G devices that we will be able to keep the unltd plan?
    2) if one of us upgrades to a 4G/LTE device that will then change?
    3) or regardless of 3G devices on our acct, the 4G/LTE may be avail in my area so it will affect our unltd data plan rates to change from the unltd anyway?



    05-17-2012 08:35 AM
  3. Hot94Z28's Avatar
    I wonder if I can keep my unlimited plan as long as I don't sign a contract? Say I buy a 4G device outright and not sign a contract.


    Sent from my iPhone 4 using Tapatalk
    05-17-2012 09:22 AM
  4. bravesfan007's Avatar
    Betting on the fact that a large number of users will be on Wi-Fi a good deal of the time is something I believe the wireless providers are doing. Still, it is not the fault of consumers if those companies offered devices that use 3G, 4G, LTE as well as sold unlimited data packages and then cringe when the user use unlimited amount of data. Unlimited data is just that...unlimited, whether via 3G, 4G or LTE. Fearing that user will consume more data via LTE is not a reason to discontinue a service that was aggressively offered. Don't get me wrong. I do understand the business aspect of their decision.



    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    I agree. We shouldn't be punished for their lack of foresight. I would hope that this would transpire into me having to pay say $20 a month for 2GB rather than the $60 a month ($30 per line) for unlimited. If it translated to cost savings, I may be more in favor of it. I just have a sneaky feeling that there will be no cost savings passed on to the consumer and rather it'll be given back to the company.
    05-17-2012 09:44 AM
  5. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I agree. We shouldn't be punished for their lack of foresight. I would hope that this would transpire into me having to pay say $20 a month for 2GB rather than the $60 a month ($30 per line) for unlimited. If it translated to cost savings, I may be more in favor of it. I just have a sneaky feeling that there will be no cost savings passed on to the consumer and rather it'll be given back to the company.
    Verizon and others, in my opinion, are banking on the continued popularity of the iPhone and the rush to buy one from both current users and non-Apple users who are waiting for it to have LTE capabilities. Furthermore, being that Apple controls the costs of its devices, wireless providers will cut options and manipulate prices of restructured data packages that will benefit them tremendously. It's business, I know, but it's bad business to arguably give the impression that the consumer should be grateful to simply have wireless service whereas they should be grateful to have customers. It's the times, I suppose, but I'm old school.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    Fausty82 likes this.
    05-17-2012 10:33 AM
  6. Fausty82's Avatar
    Verizon and others, in my opinion, are banking on the continued popularity of the iPhone and the rush to buy one from both current users and non-Apple users who are waiting for it to have LTE capabilities. Furthermore, being that Apple controls the costs of its devices, wireless providers will cut options and manipulate prices of restructured data packages that will benefit them tremendously. It's business, I know, but it's bad business to arguably give the impression that the consumer should be grateful to simply have wireless service whereas they should be grateful to have customers. It's the times, I suppose, but I'm old school.
    I don't think that I could have said it any better.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    05-17-2012 10:40 AM
  7. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Forgive my mis-inderstanding here but if someone could just clarify a bit for me - so, in my household we hae 4 iphones(2 4's & 2 4S's) and 1 droid. 1 of the iphone 4S's is on a 2gb plan so rule that one out ATM.
    But for the rest of us on the unltd data plan on 3G - am i understanding correctly that because -

    1) we are on 3G devices that we will be able to keep the unltd plan?
    2) if one of us upgrades to a 4G/LTE device that will then change?
    3) or regardless of 3G devices on our acct, the 4G/LTE may be avail in my area so it will affect our unltd data plan rates to change from the unltd anyway?



    Shammo's quote conflicts with the statement below:

    As these 3G unlimited data plan customers migrate to 4G LTE, they will have to purchase the company's data-share plan (which Verizon plans to launch in mid-summer) and move off the $30 per month unlimited data plan. "Everyone will be on data share," Shammo said.

    The opening sentence suggest that current users of 3G unlimited data plans *who migrate to 4G LTE* will have to purchase a shared data plan, however, Shammo's quote states that *everyone* will be on a data share plan. It is my belief that all unlimited data plans will cease to exist in the very near future because wireless companies have already put that plan in motion.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    Last edited by JustMe'D; 05-17-2012 at 12:58 PM.
    ThePinkChameleon likes this.
    05-17-2012 10:42 AM
  8. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I don't think that I could have said it any better.
    I'm glad we're on the same page, my friend.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 10:43 AM
  9. Adawg1203's Avatar
    Why throttle at all. If it's not a problem up to 2 GB, I'm not convinced it's a problem after 2 GB. If a person has an unlimited data plan, he or she shouldn't be punished by being throttled for using an unlimited amount of data. Just because a person more than likely has access to Wi-Fi doesn't mean that person should be forced or expected to use it. The customer should be able to decide which connection they want to use since they are paying for it. It's not the fault of customers that carriers failed to plan for and/or failed to expect the use of data intensive smartphones to explode in popularity.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    I understand your points. However it's a safe bet to say the wireless industry never saw the boom in the data arena coming, to adequately prepare. It almost happened overnight. AT&T found out first hand with the initial iPhone launch and all the network issues they experienced from it. Remember unlimited data was around before the data surge therefore, allowed carriers to offer such plans because voice and texting were the "IN' things.

    Today, there is an enormous demand for wireless data which is outpacing every other service wireless carriers provide, at an alarming rate. That's why unlimited data is no longer a service companies like Verizon can offer.

    Bandwidth is a limited resource in wireless networks not infinite. Verizon knows this and has to curb their plans while keeping up with this demand.

    Now, the question is, will Verizon provide us with reasonable usage prices on the plans they offer. I for one, sure hopes so.
    05-17-2012 10:55 AM
  10. Adawg1203's Avatar
    I work for Verizon, my mother has had Verizon since 96, they were my first cell phone provider, and I can say that when they start taking off unlimited data, I will never purchase a device from Verizon again.


    Sent from space using Tapatalk
    I am sure more carriers will follow in Verizon's footsteps. Seeing that you work for the business I'm not so sure I would chop off my nose to spite my face. At least see what they offer after all, Verizon is the hand that feeds you.
    05-17-2012 11:03 AM
  11. kch50428's Avatar
    "Unlimited" became a problem when some consumers took it to mean a cellular network connection could/should be used as a 24x7x365 internet connection rather than the "unlimited" data one could use while using apps and functions on the phones themselves or occasional tethering.

    Now, the question is, will Verizon provide us with reasonable usage prices on the plans they offer. I for one, sure hopes so.
    They sort of do - it's pay for what you use - tiered. When the time comes, I should be able to get by on a 4GB plan with my use... what would be nice is if I could get the 4GB bucket and use that between my use on the iPhone and tethering an iPad or computer when I want to on a shared basis
    05-17-2012 11:13 AM
  12. kshen1's Avatar
    Your data usage probably will increase if you move to an LTE device.
    Nope! I had a Galaxy nexus and thunderbolt before and it was around the same.
    Adawg1203 likes this.
    05-17-2012 11:14 AM
  13. kch50428's Avatar
    The opening sentence suggest that current users of 3G unlimited data plans *who migrate to 4G LTE* will have to purchase a shared data plan, however, Shammo's quote states that *everyone* will be on a data share plan. It is my belief that all unlimited data plans will cease to exist in the very near future because wireless companies have already put that plan in motion.
    They have to be very careful in how they make this change - because if they tell me mid contract I have to change from unlimited to a shared, tiered data plan - that is a material change in terms & conditions of my existing contract, and will be able to cancel ETF-free.
    05-17-2012 11:19 AM
  14. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I understand your points. However it's a safe bet to say the wireless industry never saw the boom in the data arena coming, to adequately prepare. It almost happened overnight. AT&T found out first hand with the initial iPhone launch and all the network issues they experienced from it. Remember unlimited data was around before the data surge therefore, allowed carriers to offer such plans because voice and texting were the "IN' things.

    Today, there is an enormous demand for wireless data which is outpacing every other service wireless carriers provide, at an alarming rate. That's why unlimited data is no longer a service companies like Verizon can offer.

    Bandwidth is a limited resource in wireless networks not infinite. Verizon knows this and has to curb their plans while keeping up with this demand.

    Now, the question is, will Verizon provide us with reasonable usage prices on the plans they offer. I for one, sure hopes so.
    I agree, however, even *after* the iPhone was released with AT&T having exclusive rights to sell it, with the exception being Apple, wireless carriers continued to advertise unlimited data plans in an attempt to attract customers. Sprint still does it. Now those same carriers are heavily promoting LTE and how fast it is. We've all seen the commercials and continue to see the commercials and those commercials only show smartphones. In other words, they are still contributing to the problem they are allegedly trying to fix and that is to stem the use of data by its customers over their networks.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 11:49 AM
  15. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    "Unlimited" became a problem when some consumers took it to mean a cellular network connection could/should be used as a 24x7x365 internet connection rather than the "unlimited" data one could use while using apps and functions on the phones themselves or occasional tethering....(snipped)...
    Did the wireless carriers define "unlimited data" in the manner in which you've defined it?


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 11:53 AM
  16. kch50428's Avatar
    Did the wireless carriers define "unlimited data" in the manner in which you've defined it?
    I've read terms & conditions agreements that did. Carriers were lax about enforcing those T&Cs, and we are where we are today.
    05-17-2012 11:56 AM
  17. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    They have to be very careful in how they make this change - because if they tell me mid contract I have to change from unlimited to a shared, tiered data plan - that is a material change in terms & conditions of my existing contract, and will be able to cancel ETF-free.
    No doubt about it, but do you think the carriers are willing to risk it in order to achieve the goal of ridding itself of unlimited data plans? I do. More and more people are buying smartphones and those new customers will have no choice except to purchase a tiered data plan.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 11:56 AM
  18. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I've read terms & conditions agreements that did. Carriers were lax about enforcing those T&Cs, and we are where we are today.
    Oh okay. Well in that case, I'm in full agreement with you.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 11:58 AM
  19. kch50428's Avatar
    No doubt about it, but do you think the carriers are willing to risk it in order to achieve the goal of ridding itself of unlimited data plans? I do. More and more people are buying smartphones and those new customers will have no choice except to purchase a tiered data plan.
    They will go to great lengths NOT to do an action that would allow customers to bolt ETF-free mid contract.
    05-17-2012 11:59 AM
  20. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    They will go to great lengths NOT to do an action that would allow customers to bolt ETF-free mid contract.
    Again, I agree, but I still believe they have an acceptable risk level.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    05-17-2012 12:02 PM
  21. Fausty82's Avatar
    They have to be very careful in how they make this change - because if they tell me mid contract I have to change from unlimited to a shared, tiered data plan - that is a material change in terms & conditions of my existing contract, and will be able to cancel ETF-free.
    That is why the data plans are NOT part of the basic contract... it's an add-on, just like texting. Changing the terms of the DATA plan will not constitute a "material adverse change" to your wireless (read: voice) contract.

    They're all too smart (or too "lawyered-up") to let that happen.
    05-17-2012 12:04 PM
  22. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Here's an update that clarifies things a bit more and I think answers Pink's question.

    http://dthin.gs/KDDKoD


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    ThePinkChameleon likes this.
    05-17-2012 12:08 PM
  23. kch50428's Avatar
    It looks to me that switching to a 4G device will necessitate the new tiered share plan structure.
    05-17-2012 12:14 PM
  24. epphllps's Avatar
    Sign it and spread it far and wide.

    http://www.change.org/petitions/stop...ng-subscribers

    Word has been spread that, as with the $2 fee, if the petition can reach 50,000 people they will take action. Let's see what we can do and if that is, indeed, true. This is the only way to find out for sure.
    05-17-2012 12:23 PM
  25. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    Shammo's quote gives conflicts with the statement below:

    As these 3G unlimited data plan customers migrate to 4G LTE, they will have to purchase the company's data-share plan (which Verizon plans to launch in mid-summer) and move off the $30 per month unlimited data plan. "Everyone will be on data share," Shammo said.

    The opening sentence suggest that current users of 3G unlimited data plans *who migrate to 4G LTE* will have to purchase a shared data plan, however, Shammo's quote states that *everyone* will be on a data share plan. It is my belief that all unlimited data plans will cease to exist in the very near future because wireless companies have already put that plan in motion.


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    Here's an update that clarifies things a bit more and I think answers Pink's question.

    Verizon Unlimited User Plans Not Going Away, Options Likely to Narrow - Ina Fried - Mobile - AllThingsD


    Just Me, D
    (Tapatalk - iPhone 4S)
    tyvm D for both of your responses !! I originally posted my questions because as you quoted from Shammo, it was a bit conflicting/confusing on info. BUT i just breezed thru the article from the link you posted as well, and that has more clarification for those of us that are on 3G if we do not move onto a 4G LTE device, that the unltd data plan we have, we will be able to hang onto for as long as possible

    Thanks again
    05-17-2012 12:54 PM
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