Winter Solstice 2021 - Happy First Day of Winter

Annie_M

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Winter begins in 11 minutes (10:59 EST)! Today is the shortest day of the year, but the good news is that the days will start getting longer!!!
 

Honey Beagle

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Sun is not all that important. Is summer time lasted like one month then that would be ok.

But, also summertime means hurricanes and other bad weather more often.
 

EdwinG

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Happy Winter for winter fans. :)

I’m not a fan of winters… -20°C, 30cm snowstorms and sliding on ice. Yeah, no thanks! Summer anytime for me
 

Honey Beagle

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Happy Winter for winter fans. :)

I’m not a fan of winters… -20°C, 30cm snowstorms and sliding on ice. Yeah, no thanks! Summer anytime for me

Summers wayyyyy to hot. Highs in 90s a few times in the 100s. Humidity makes the temperature like 115.

Don’t need that.
 

EdwinG

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Summers wayyyyy to hot. Highs in 90s a few times in the 100s. Humidity makes the temperature like 115.

Don’t need that.
32ºC is not too bad, although when it feels like 40C, it becomes difficult to live with.

I would not complain with the 25-30ºC averages :)
 

EdwinG

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Do not know what that converts to. Those temperatures look cold enough for me.

The only Fahrenheit markers I know are:
-40°C = -40°F
0°C = 32°F
200°C = 400°F
It’s not like it’s really used around here, nor is it even taught in school
I only know these because of my former coworkers in the USA.

So here are the conversions for those that I mentioned, looked up on Wolfram Alpha:
  • 25°C = 77°F
  • 30°C = 86°F
  • 32°C = 89.6°F
  • 40°C = 104°F
 

Honey Beagle

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One temperature scale called Kelvin.

Would that nit be confusing if the world was converted to Kelvin.

The USA was supposed to convert to Celsius awhile but, never did.

To me that is great. Didn’t have to learn the new temperature scale.

The countries and territories that use the Fahrenheit scale are:
United States.
Bahamas.
Cayman Islands.
Liberia.
Palau.
The Federated States of Micronesia.
Marshall Islands.

19fee5cc93979234ea649707050b9f04.jpg
 

EdwinG

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I wonder why most countries changed over to metric.

I have a reasonable non-researched explanation for that.

The metric and the International System of Units (ISU) - used in many math, chemistry and physics formulae, are very closely related if not exactly the same. Also, conversions between larger and smaller subunits are easy to do, they are usually multiples of 10.


  • Distance (same for metric and ISU): metre
    • 1 kilometre (km) = 1 000 metres (m) = 1 000 000 millimetres (mm)
  • Mass (same for metric and ISU): kilogram
    • 1 kilogram (kg) = 1 000 grams (g) = 1 000 000 milligrams (mg)
  • Volume (different between metric and ISU, but closely related): cubic metre
    • 1 litre (L - in metric) = 0.001 m[SUP]3[/SUP] (in ISU, or the volume of a liquid in a 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm cube ;) )
    • Note: Cubic conversions are multiples of 10[SUP]3[/SUP]
  • Time: second (s)
    • I hope we all know how time works :p
  • Temperature (different between metric and ISU): Kelvin
    • 1 degrees Celsius (ºC) = 274.15 Kelvin (K)
      You always subtract 273.15 to your Kelvin to get degrees Celsius.
  • Information storage units: Bytes (they are the same between metric and ISU)
    • 1 megabyte (MB) = 1 000 kilobytes (KB) = 1 000 000 bytes (B)
    • Not to be confused with the traditional binary system: Bytes
      1 mebibyte (MiB) = 1024 kibibyte (KiB) = 1 048 576 bytes (B)

You can also see the difference between mass and weight (which is one of my favourites). Weight is a dependent on mass and your acceleration (incl. gravitational pull).
  • Weight: 1 Newton (N) = 1 kg x m x s[SUP]-2[/SUP]

Oh, and the USA is using the ISU units even within its governmental agencies… Look at the Mars Climate Orbiter that was lost because of a unit discrepancy between NASA's software and one of its contractors: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Climate_Orbiter#Cause_of_failure
By the way, this mistake is often mentioned in my university courses because of how simple it was to avoid if things were communicated properly ;)


While I like this discussion, we are going way off-topic ������
If it's possible to split off this discussion into its own thread, that would be great :)
 
Last edited:

Annie_M

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I have a reasonable non-researched explanation for that.

The metric and the International System of Units (ISU) - used in many math, chemistry and physics formulae, are very closely related if not exactly the same. Also, conversions between larger and smaller subunits are easy to do, they are usually multiples of 10.


  • Distance (same for metric and ISU): metre
    • 1 kilometre (km) = 1 000 metres (m) = 1 000 000 millimetres (mm)
  • Mass (same for metric and ISU): kilogram
    • 1 kilogram (kg) = 1 000 grams (g) = 1 000 000 milligrams (mg)
  • Volume (different between metric and ISU, but closely related): cubic metre
    • 1 litre (L - in metric) = 0.001 m[SUP]3[/SUP] (in ISU, or the volume of a liquid in a 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm cube ;) )
    • Note: Cubic conversions are multiples of 10[SUP]3[/SUP]
  • Time: second (s)
    • I hope we all know how time works :p
  • Temperature (different between metric and ISU): Kelvin
    • 1 degrees Celsius (ºC) = 274.15 Kelvin (K)
      You always subtract 273.15 to your Kelvin to get degrees Celsius.
  • Information storage units: Bytes (they are the same between metric and ISU)
    • 1 megabyte (MB) = 1 000 kilobytes (KB) = 1 000 000 bytes (B)
    • Not to be confused with the traditional binary system: Bytes
      1 mebibyte (MiB) = 1024 kibibyte (KiB) = 1 048 576 bytes (B)

You can also see the difference between mass and weight (which is one of my favourites). Weight is a dependent on mass and your acceleration (incl. gravitational pull).
  • Weight: 1 Newton (N) = 1 kg x m x s[SUP]-2[/SUP]

Oh, and the USA is using the ISU units even within its governmental agencies… Look at the Mars Climate Orbiter that was lost because of a unit discrepancy between NASA's software and one of its contractors: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Climate_Orbiter#Cause_of_failure
By the way, this mistake is often mentioned in my university courses because of how simple it was to avoid if things were communicated properly ;)


While I like this discussion, we are going way off-topic ������
If it's possible to split off this discussion into its own thread, that would be great :)

Like a weather-related thread?
 

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