Will Apple have an answer to WebOS

infenit101

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The Palm team got it right with WebOS, as it is highly organized, has a small memory footprint, and allows you to have multiple apps open at the same time allowing you to scroll through them like tabs on a browser.

So I am just wondering what you guys think? Will we still have to close an app to get to another one?
 

JustinHorn

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You can't have that many pages open on the Pre as reports are coming in that it starts to slow down. Apple's iPhone OS is really good an they will eventually allow multitasking when the hardware can support it well. That might be as soon as the 3rd gen iPhone due in about a month, but maybe not.
 

chobbs1

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I think I get the basic concept. the actual application on the pre is out there on the internet somewhere in cyberspace right? doesn't that make it vulnerable to malware? I like native apps. what if your in an area that has no connection at all? will you still be able to run an app?
 

JustinHorn

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The Pre apps are native apps. It's just the code is based on web standards. With HTML, CSS, and Javascript the browser can be used for things that work just like stand alone programs on the computer.
 

chobbs1

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Then I was way off. thanks for clearing that up. I was wondering why everyone was so excited by webos...cause webapps have been around for a while and they are ok but not great!
 

sting7k

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I don't know about the small memory foot print. Cnet, WSJ, and Engadget all said it starts to hang/lag a bit after you get a bunch of apps open. Cnet said it was no worse than most WinMo phones, but that is enough for me.

Plus, while it's on Sprint it has no chance of reaching my hands. Lastly, it's looking like it's battery is even worse than the iPhone, another complain common among those 3 reviewers.
 

infenit101

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I think I get the basic concept. the actual application on the pre is out there on the internet somewhere in cyberspace right? doesn't that make it vulnerable to malware? I like native apps. what if your in an area that has no connection at all? will you still be able to run an app?

Actually the apps run locally and there is no need for an internet connection. It's basically a native app.
 

infenit101

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I don't know about the small memory foot print. Cnet, WSJ, and Engadget all said it starts to hang/lag a bit after you get a bunch of apps open. Cnet said it was no worse than most WinMo phones, but that is enough for me.

Plus, while it's on Sprint it has no chance of reaching my hands. Lastly, it's looking like it's battery is even worse than the iPhone, another complain common among those 3 reviewers.

That's better than exiting an app and going to the home screen to open up another app. Even if apple eventually gets real multi-tasking you won't be able to seamlessly go to your next program like you can with the card interface.
 

infenit101

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The main focus of webOS is cards, essentially a list of open applications which can be moved into and out of with the press of the center button or a swipe of your finger. The emphasis here is on multitasking as well as reducing the number of steps required to go from one action to another. The premise is extremely simple, and in this implementation, extremely useful. Applications do seem to take a slight bit longer to load than those on competing platforms, but the beauty of the Pre is that you're not opening and closing apps that often. Additionally, if you're used to Windows Mobile or the BlackBerry OS, this is a major shift -- instead of obscuring what apps are open, you can almost instantly snap to a clear picture of what you're working on. The idea allows for some pretty interesting use cases, like being able to jump back and forth between a webpage and an SMS thread, or out of a call, into your weather application, and back into the call with little effort. You can rearrange the card order, and when you're finished with an app (or when you tax your memory), you can just swipe up on one of the cards to quit, though it keeps your data in a save state so you're not back to square one when you reopen.

Our take? The concept and execution on cards is excellent. The experience of using them to get around during the day feels like half application switcher and half active widgets, and is completely appropriate for a mobile device. Additionally, Palm warned that after seven or eight apps, depending on footprint, we'd have to start closing some items to save memory, but we've taken the Pre up to 12 apps and beyond (including four browser windows, email, SMS / AIM conversations, the AccuWeather app, Pandora streaming in the background, dialer, and more) with no issue. The overall OS does seem to get a little sluggish as you pile on the programs, but certainly never to a point that was unusable. We did experience some freezes and a handful of crashes, but only when we pushed the device extremely hard.


From Engadget. The Iphone 3g nor the V3 will be able to do that. So I am asking do you guys think they will have an answer. WebOs is a gamechanger.
 

SuperTrouper

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Personally for me this changes nothing. Multitasking on the handheld is nothing new. Not multi-tasking is new and having come from multi-tasking devices in the past, the Pre has shown me nothing that will turn my head.

The iPhone OS does everything I could ask of it and it handles it with great responsiveness and stability. If that's enough for you great, if not, there are a world of other options out there, not just the Pre.
 

infenit101

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Personally for me this changes nothing. Multitasking on the handheld is nothing new. Not multi-tasking is new and having come from multi-tasking devices in the past, the Pre has shown me nothing that will turn my head.

The iPhone OS does everything I could ask of it and it handles it with great responsiveness and stability. If that's enough for you great, if not, there are a world of other options out there, not just the Pre.

Forget the Pre.. i am talking about WebOS. No one yet has developed a seamless way of multi-tasking and viewing notifications. Apple is pretty much doing the same thing Windows and BB are doing: allowing you to keep multiple apps open but not be able to switch between them without closing another one.
 

SuperTrouper

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Apple is pretty much doing the same thing Windows and BB are doing: allowing you to keep multiple apps open but not be able to switch between them without closing another one.

You've either not used a Blackberry before, or you've missed how to switch tasks on them.

Believe me you can switch between running apps on a Blackberry device too.

Personally, I'm much more in favour of the "No background apps - push notification" paradigm than the "multitasking" way Blackberry and now Palm are going.

Often on a Blackberry, you can have a rogue program open that you didn't think was open and next time you come to look at your phone you've suddenly lost a huge chunk of battery charge because that app has been running away doing something.

You never have to worry about that on an iPhone, it has a predictable battery life and you know when you can count on it being ready for use.
 

infenit101

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You've either not used a Blackberry before, or you've missed how to switch tasks on them.

Believe me you can switch between running apps on a Blackberry device too.

Personally, I'm much more in favour of the "No background apps - push notification" paradigm than the "multitasking" way Blackberry and now Palm are going.

Often on a Blackberry, you can have a rogue program open that you didn't think was open and next time you come to look at your phone you've suddenly lost a huge chunk of battery charge because that app has been running away doing something.

You never have to worry about that on an iPhone, it has a predictable battery life and you know when you can count on it being ready for use.


Obviously you don't understand what I am saying. On BB if you want to multitask you can but you can't go back and forth between apps without exiting the one you are which by the way is still running. With WebOS you can have all your relevant apps running and for example go to the calendar if you need to make an appointment reminder and scroll and email your wife, boss, etc without having to exit the calendar app. And if you say hey I don't like this song while you are doing it you can scroll to the music app and change the song then scroll back to the calendar jot down other dates, then scroll back to the email app and check if you got a message.

If you think about it it is really no different than a desktop OS. Right now I have firefox open, windows movie maker, and live messenger. If I want to switch between them I can as all of them are loaded into my memory.
 

OmariJames

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Different OS are going to do things differently. Whether its mobile or desktop. I don't think companies should directly "answer" to another when they launch a new product but continue to make what they have better. The company's real " answer " should be their own ideas. Answering is following but making your own product better is creating your own path.

Usually, the companies that answer to other companies failed. For example the whole iPhone-Killer thing. A lot of those other companies failed because they tried to directly compete instead of making what they had better.

When it comes to iPhone OS and WebOS , I don't think Apple will " answer " to them. Apple can always make multi-tasking better in the future by having their own ideas. Copying the " cards " application switching won't fit well in the current iPhone OS IMO.
 

Watcher

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I agree with Omari. Apple doesn't have to "answer" anything from Palm regarding the Pre. The Pre is actually Palm's "answer" to Apple about the iPhone and it is definitely an iClone if their ever was one. The fact that Jon Rubinstein used to work for Apple is proof enough that it is a direct challenge to the iPhone. The onus is upon Palm to prove that they are a force to be reckoned with by Apple. We'll just have to wait and see if the public will favorably respond to the Palm Pre and WebOS by their consumer dollars. After all, that's what it comes down to - revenue. Everything else is just blogging chatter by internet geeks like you and me.
 

Brickman

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I have to agree with Watcher on this. I do not think that the iPhone has to answer anything yet. The Pre is not even out for retail yet. We need at least a couple of weeks to see what it can do first.

I guess when someone sells 4M in a quarter, Apple may have to pay attention. Until then Apple will just keep looking over their shoulder at the rest of the competition...behind them.;)
 

Watcher

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There's another thing I'd like to add. What people don't realize or understand is Apple's so called "magic" with the iPhone. Many companies and people, for that matter, just don't get it's appeal. There are smartphones and PDAs with many more features than the iPhone 3G but that alone is not enough to dominate them in marketshare, or in popularity. Techie geeks are killing themselves trying to figure out why people would want to buy such an "inferior" device! I'll tell you what every other phone manufacturer fails to do when they attempt to release the next "iPhone Killer".... SIMPLICITY! They cannot duplicate it's elementary operation and intuitive interface.

Apple's iPhone is SIMPLE, not to mention sleek, elegant and stylish. However, I think it's primary simplicity is what makes people flock to it; the same ease of use that Mac's have over PC's. This is what the competition just can't put their heads around, and even if they do, they cannot emulate it and they have definitely tried!
 
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bujin

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I'm a Palm fan from way back, and now have the Touch Pro. When I first saw WebOS / Pre, I was excited and thought it might be a gamechanger as well. Then, as the newness of the concept wore off, I realized that it really wasn't functionally different from Windows Mobile: On the Pre, I'd hit the center button, flick cards to the app I wanted, and press it... 3 motions. On my TP, I hit the home button, press the right corner to get my list of running apps, and press it...3 motions.

That being said, there's a reason that the iPhone has led in customer satisfaction among smartphones: it doesn't matter if other phones can do more than the iPhone, if that's not what most users want. If multitasking were a priority, then there are other systems that already do that, and the iPhone is still the industry leader.

I'm considering an iPhone for my next phone for a simple reason: my work supports only iPhone for calendar / email. And that's not a small thing...everyone is creating content specifically for the iPhone.
 
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