Why do Apple Stores not care about its employees

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I’ve heard from employees from many stores that management care more about sales than its people
 

Tartarus

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I’ve heard from employees from many stores that management care more about sales than its people

I work at a large delivery service and we say the same about our employer. Doesn’t make it any true though.
People are born whiners and complainer. Heck, we even came out crying out loud
 

Lee_Bo

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Well unfortunately sales is what keeps a lot of companies doors open. I good manager will do what they can to balance employee happiness with company goals. A lot of times those company goals cause a loss of morale for employees and the perception is that the company cares more about sales than its employees.

But the bottom line is if sales aren't being made, that job won't last long and the companies doors will soon close.
 

Annie_M

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Our local Apple Store has been open for 6 years. Many of the people that worked there on day one are still there, and they seem happy. I realize that this may not be the case everywhere, but I think it demonstrates that the OP's question does not apply to every Apple Store.
 

Quis89

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It isn't Apple. It's retail and sales environments in general. They tend to be more toxic, in general. Management has an insane amount of pressure applied to them for their stores to perform. Some managers manage that pressure well and don't allow their staff to feel it. Others don't.
 

Annie_M

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It isn't Apple. It's retail and sales environments in general. They tend to be more toxic, in general. Management has an insane amount of pressure applied to them for their stores to perform. Some managers manage that pressure well and don't allow their staff to feel it. Others don't.

That makes sense. I know of many retailers that pressure their sales staff to get customers to buy more than one item. I hate that when it happens. If I wanted to buy more than one item, I'd have done so. I realize that the salesperson is only doing what they've been instructed to do. They might get a bonus or some other reward. Or, they might just get to keep their job.
 

Quis89

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That makes sense. I know of many retailers that pressure their sales staff to get customers to buy more than one item. I hate that when it happens. If I wanted to buy more than one item, I'd have done so. I realize that the salesperson is only doing what they've been instructed to do. They might get a bonus or some other reward. Or, they might just get to keep their job.

Yes, it can be pretty demanding. Most sales based retail environments have requirements that salespeople either bring multiple products to the table or they encourage you to purchase more. Some environments reprimand employees for not following this. If their sales are low, they may get written up. After consecutive months of low sales they may lose their jobs. If its a commission based store, that sale is what pays the employees bills so they have incentive to sell more and push you to spend more.

I see it both ways because I've been on both sides. What I have learned is personality sells far more than being pushy. You don't sell a product, you sell a solution. And you do this as a person, not as a salesperson.

But I do understand the pressure managers are under and I understand how that pressure can impact their employees. I've seen it first hand.
 

Golfdriver97

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You could almost even make the statement more broad....any company controlled by shareholders looks at things this way.
 

Ken Magel

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One could view many companies as having three levels: those employees who deal directly with customers or with manufacturing the product; middle management; and top management. One could argue that the lowest tier is most responsible for a company's success or failure, but it is the other tiers, especially the top that get the perks and often have less hectic work schedules.