What has Apple gotten right that Google hasn’t?

scgf

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I still keep using iPhone and Apple products. Why? Because I simply hate the idea to be constantly spied on by Google. Simple like that.
Well as a long-time Android user I hate the data gathering shenanigans of Google. My concern has deepened so much that I have stopped using as many Google services as possible and intend buying the iPhone Xs as soon as it is available to pre-order.
 

iN8ter

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Well as a long-time Android user I hate the data gathering shenanigans of Google. My concern has deepened so much that I have stopped using as many Google services as possible and intend buying the iPhone Xs as soon as it is available to pre-order.

All OEMs collect data. You’re free to forego features to keep your data private, though. At least as much as possible...

For example, you’re going to have trouble using Digital Assistants without giving them access to almost everything on your phone - all of them. None of them can work without sending data to a web service.

I also think people have began to lump data collection for purposes of improving services together with data collection for the purpose of advertising.

Even when I was on Android, I barely used Google Services, and had most of their apps disabled. This is one of the biggest selling points for OEM devices. They have really good stock apps and don’t keep you beholden to Google’s, like a Pixel phone does (as using third parties introduces additional risk - something iOS users have been finding out lately with AirMail 3 and the Virus scanning app, etc.).

The Google Account exists primarily for Play Store Access and Play Music Locker.

If you want to maintain a YouTube Channel, you need a Google Account.

If you’re on Facebook or Instagram, those are getting a lot more personal information about you (via directly or via proxy from your connections) regardless of what phone you use. Switching won’t save you. Quitting them is the best option (Social Media Free 3 years, yay!).

———

Apple is better at security updates than Android OEMs. Certainly faster. Google is as good as Apple for Pixels. Smaller Android OEMs are better than the bigger ones - particularly those that do not sell through carriers.

Feature updates for Apple are pretty thin, and they don’t really seem to do much to expand device functionality; so I don’t really value iOS updates that highly anymore. So I co sister a lot of hardware capabilities to be wasted in the devices as a result. iOS updates tend to slow things down, which is why they’ve had to dedicate an entire release to performance (this wasn’t a new problem, or even close to new).

Devices from Samsung have enough features for the next 20 iOS updates, and then some - so feature updates there are a ton less relevant. Their users are less likely to be asking for a feature than Apple users (who begged for years for a file manager, and just got notification grouping).

Android OEMs are pretty good about security updates, these days, and that’s generally good enough for me. Android version updates don’t tend to add much - if anything - they didn’t have years ago, so are quite overrated. Those are more relevant to stock devices, which feel more like iOS for practical usage.

Multi-Window, Power Saving Modes, Camera features, etc. have been coming to stock Android 2-4 years after OEMs implement them - and often with a worse user experience.

I think the update relevance depends on how often you upgrade, as well.

If you upgrade yearly, it is completely ignorable IMO. If you keep a phone for more than 2 years, then it becomes a lot more important.

Personally going back to Samsung this year. iOS seems like the platform for the patient. Still waiting to gain back some fairly basic functionality that my Note 3 offered, and at this point the goalpost has been moved to September 2019.

I can no longer destroy my productivity over a preference. I’m exasperated with it.
 

anon(50597)

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It’s really hard to argue one against the other because they are so different.
For me, service is important. Having a physical location to go to if I have problems means a lot. I haven’t had many issues but it’s still something I value.
Google collects your information/data for advertising purposes. I’m tired of having advertising pushed at me so, no thanks. No one is a saint but I trust Apple more.
No fragmentation. Things are more cohesive no matter what devices you are using.
Support for many more years
Each has their positives/negatives. For now I’m sticking with Apple.
 

iN8ter

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There’s no such thing as Android fragmentation. Haven’t seen that word in like two years. Throwback!

I think the screen resolutions were more problematic for me, on iOS, than any perceived “fragmentation” on Android.

Keep in mind a ton of Android users stick with a certain brand, so there is just as much continuity from device to device for them as for Apple users. Fragmentation doesn’t exist for those users. It certainly doesn’t affect the usability of their devices - AT ALL.

When unused Android, I went from Galaxy S to S2 to S3 to Note 3. This is like going from iPhone 4 to 4S to 5 to 6 Plus. The experience felt not much different from iOS going from device to device - except Samsung was more aggressive with adding software features.

Most Android users don’t vendor hop. This is why Android OEMs have a hard time competing. Samsung is basically Apple in the Android ecosystem.

Android is not one monolithic platform/ecosystem like iOS, macOS or Windows. It’s more like Linux. You have Red Hat, and SuSE, and Ubuntu, and Slackware. They all run basically the same apps, even if some packages are different versions.

Fragmentation is only a thing for people who don’t understand this and/or vendor hop each year; which is missing the point. It also probably means they fail to understand why Android vendors differentiate even at the services later, despite Google being on Android!

Samsung Experience is based on Android. It is not Android. It’s a compatible platform built on top of a common base. Samsung’s “Android” is as much Android as macOS is BSD. What Android OEMs do are the same things Apple has done with Unix.

It seems hypocritical that the company who popularized that business model would have fans deriding the competition for following suit.

Android devices have to be certified for compatibility. Fragmentation is a myth, and always has been. Very few developers on macOS, Windows, iOS or Android target only the latest version of the OS, so why should those people care this much what OS is running under their “district,” as long as the security updates are prompt???
 

anon(50597)

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What percentage of Android users are running Oreo?
What percentage of iOS users (give it a couple of days) will be running 12?

It’s not a myth, it’s inherent in the design. Android has many versions and many manufacturers making hardware. It’s impossible for there to be the cohesiveness found in iOS.

Not a knock, just my observation. I prefer cohesiveness.
 

iN8ter

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What percentage of Android users are running Oreo?
What percentage of iOS users (give it a couple of days) will be running 12?

It’s not a myth, it’s inherent in the design. Android has many versions and many manufacturers making hardware. It’s impossible for there to be the cohesiveness found in iOS.

Not a knock, just my observation. I prefer cohesiveness.

Clearly you do not read.

I suggest you do. I know it’s a lot, but I have faith in you.

Oreo offers very little if anything to a Samsung device user on Nougat. The benefits are all in the Samsung Experience software, which Google definitely didn’t develop.
 

iN8ter

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I read.
You made an argument why fragmentation is ok.
I don’t agree.

Easy peasy

There is no fragmentation.

Only the warped expectation or idea that Samsung Experience is Android proper, which it isn’t.

Most of us understand how this works. That is why you should read, cause I’m sure you didn’t get past the first paragraph.

Samsung compared to Stock is like macOS compared to FreeBSD. Do you use only Windows because you prefer “cohesiveness?”

Your argument doesn’t pass a basic test. I suggest you revisit it.

P.S. name one major app that runs on Android Nougat or iOS 10 that does not run on Android Pie or iOS 12...
 

anon(50597)

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There is no fragmentation.

Only the warped expectation or idea that Samsung Experience is Android proper, which it isn’t.

Most of us understand how this works. That is why you should read, cause I’m sure you didn’t get past the first paragraph.

Samsung compared to Stock is like macOS compared to FreeBSD. Do you use only Windows because you prefer “cohesiveness?”

Your argument doesn’t pass a basic test. I suggest you revisit it.

Good question.
I don’t use Windows at all.

Enjoy your new device.
 

iN8ter

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Good question.
I don’t use Windows at all.

Exactly my point ;-)

——

Cohesiveness is in Android if you stop treating every OEM like they’re developing literally the same OS.

Android is a base to be built upon - like Linux or BSD. Samsung’s Android “district” is basically a different OS using the same underpinnings - the way macOS uses UNIx - but we speak of it as a different platform altogether; not generic UNIX.

Google tests and certifies to maintain compatibility across them, for the purpose of Play Store and native access to their ecosystem. This is a selling point to consumers, so vendors stick to this model. There is a reason why OEMs name their skins (Sense, Samsung Experience, MIUI, etc.).

Cohesiveness is gained and maintained by not vendor hopping. Upgrading from one S or Note to another is indistinguishable from upgrading an iPhone. I stopped caring about Android version updates years ago, when I realized nothing of worth cane from them. The OEMs already had implemented all the “good features” and Google offloaded a lot of other stuff to Play Services; which used to require a FW update.

“Android” is not iOS. You don’t need an update for an new Mail app. The only huge consideration are security updates.

Apple makes this cut and dry by simply not licensing out their platforms ;-)

The version number of the underlying platform does not matter because OEMs are years ahead of Google in product/feature development. Again: What matters is security updates. OEMs are good with that, these days.

Most consumers update for the vendor features, not Android kernel version numbers. Google got Multi-Window in base Android 4-6 years after Samsung and LG, for example.
 

anon(50597)

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Exactly my point ;-)

——

Cohesiveness is in Android if you stop treating every OEM like they’re developing the same OS.

Android is a base to be built on - like Linux or BSD. Samsung’s Android is basically a different OS using the same underpinnings. Google tests and certified to maintain compatibility across them, for the purpose of Play Store and native access to their ecosystem.

Cohesiveness is gained and maintained by not vendor hopping.

Apple makes this cut and dry by simply not licensing out their platforms ;-)

Sigh......

I’m sorry I offended you by using the word fragmented. I have my (current) reasons for preferring iOS as you now have your personally legitimate reasons for wanting to switch to Android.
Does it really matter? We have choice! That’s a good thing.

You cannot convince me Android is anything I want to currently use any more than I can convince you to not switch. My devices work extremely well for my needs. Perfect? Of course not. Hopefully Android will help you do the same.
 

iN8ter

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Sigh......

I’m sorry I offended you by using the word fragmented. I have my (current) reasons for preferring iOS as you now have your personally legitimate reasons for wanting to switch to Android.
Does it really matter? We have choice! That’s a good thing.

You cannot convince me Android is anything I want to currently use any more than I can convince you to not switch. My devices work extremely well for my needs. Perfect? Of course not. Hopefully Android will help you do the same.

Aren’t you the one who responded to me in disagreement? You are now speaking as if it was the other way around.

If you’re going to disagree, at least explain why. Don’t get pissy when someone responds and then claim they are acting “offended” simply because you were far too damn lazy to read the post you replied to.

And how in the living f$@& do you think I’m trying to convince you of anything. I have made no such recommendation to you. The only thing I did was clarify and repeat what you refuse to read and comprehend yourself.

Please quote such statements of recommendation or attempts to convince you or anyone else to switch platforms.

I want to see this...
 

bakron1

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For myself it’s about the integration between my iPhone and my Apple desktop and reliability that’s keeps me in the Apple platform.

I know google does a lot of cool things and Android is the most widely used OS, but the updates are not as controlled as Apples and are tied to the carrier and I make sure all my devices are updated automatically.

I also like iCloud backup which in my opinion is the best device backup in the business. I backup my device every night and if my device dies, I simply get a new one and use the restore function and my new device is exactly like my old one without missing a beat.

I will always love the simplicity of IOS and I say this all the time when folks ask me why I keep going back to my iPhone and IOS, it just works, plain and simple.

As far as Mac OS, I left the PC world back in 2008 when our company shifted from PC to Mac and have never looked back.

In the end it’s all about what works best for you individual needs. Some folks love Windows and the PC world and some folks like me love Mac.

Last, but not least you have to decide what’s best for your needs based on your budget and what your going to be using the device for and decide which one will satisfy both parameters and go with it.
 

anon(50597)

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For myself it’s about the integration between my iPhone and my Apple desktop and reliability that’s keeps me in the Apple platform.

I know google does a lot of cool things and Android is the most widely used OS, but the updates are not as controlled as Apples and are tied to the carrier and I make sure all my devices are updated automatically.

I also like iCloud backup which in my opinion is the best device backup in the business. I backup my device every night and if my device dies, I simply get a new one and use the restore function and my new device is exactly like my old one without missing a beat.

I will always love the simplicity of IOS and I say this all the time when folks ask me why I keep going back to my iPhone and IOS, it just works, plain and simple.

As far as Mac OS, I left the PC world back in 2008 when our company shifted from PC to Mac and have never looked back.

In the end it’s all about what works best for you individual needs. Some folks love Windows and the PC world and some folks like me love Mac.

Last, but not least you have to decide what’s best for your needs based on your budget and what your going to be using the device for and decide which one will satisfy both parameters and go with it.

Well said Bakron. There is something to say about simplicity, and I don’t mean lacking features. Why just shove a bunch of features into a smartphone that most people won’t use? Make them useful. Make them integrate beautifully with your ecosystem. Apple, for the most part, has the best overall experience for me.
 

Speedygi

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I like the unified branding from Apple. That and awesome build quality. But recently Apple has waned in the area of goodies.
 

kataran

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I’ve said it before Software and Hardware integration is Apple’s strong suit

Although Google is in the running there fragmentation will always keep them in second place
 

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