iOS 17 could force millions of iPhone owners to upgrade

Lee_Bo

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Makes you wonder if Apple Car (if it ever happens) will follow the same way. Your 3 year old car isn’t compatible with the upcoming CarOS update and you’ll have to upgrade to a new car.
 

Just_Me_D

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The iPhone X and iPhone 8 were released almost 6 years ago so I’m not at all surprised that they may not be compatible with the upcoming iOS 17 operating system.
 

FFR

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Up_And_Away

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Next iOS will not be supported but a couple years of Software Support is likely still going to be provided. Samsung bragged about their year of Software Support (4 years! Fine print: 3 years of OS, 1 year [2 updates in that year] of software support).

I don’t recommend it. When OS support ends it’s time for a new iPhone. Security matters. Hey, you got 5 years, that’s 12 to 19 bucks a month for a highly sophisticated, numerous multi uses device that you probably use A LOT every day of those 5 years. This is not a device you put duct tape on to get 12 more months out of it.
 
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FFR

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6 years of support is more than enough and much higher than the industry average of 2, budget android doesn’t even get updates.
 
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Ledsteplin

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Next iOS will not be supported but a couple years of Software Support is likely still going to be provided. Samsung bragged about their year of Software Support (4 years! Fine print: 3 years of OS, 1 year [2 updates in that year] of software support).

I don’t recommend it. When OS support ends it’s time for a new iPhone. Security matters. Hey, you got 5 years, that’s 12 to 19 bucks a month for a highly sophisticated, numerous multi uses device that you probably use A LOT every day of those 5 years. This is not a device you put duct tape on to get 12 more months out of it.

As far as security goes, Apple usually offers 2 years of security updates after support ends. My old 6s Plus doesn't get iOS 16, but still gets an occasional security update. So if a user likes their iPhone 8 Plus for the home button, for example, they could continue to use it safely a couple more years after support ends. And most apps would remain compatable during those 2 years.
 
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Up_And_Away

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As far as security goes, Apple usually offers 2 years of security updates after support ends. My old 6s Plus doesn't get iOS 16, but still gets an occasional security update. So if a user likes their iPhone 8 Plus for the home button, for example, they could continue to use it safely a couple more years after support ends. And most apps would remain compatable during those 2 years.

I completely understand that view, and respect it, but “safely”, as a matter of degree, is something we’ll have to agree to disagree on. Your smartphone goes back and forth from your home network to potentially various public networks. Your smartphone is likely reaching out to numerous mother ships, so to speak, of various domains in various geographic areas. Your smartphone contains some of your most very sensitive data including one of the pinnacles of compromise:getting to a weak device in your home network..
Security updates after a device no longer supports new OS will be, what we call, best effort (you’ll get patched when it’s possible and feasible).
Ultimately the combination of various networks then back to your own, constant mother ship comms on likely plug n play enabled firewalls, likely potentially weak security (even TLS 1.2 is compromised) on devices in your own network, best effort security patching —>this just doesn’t hit the mark of what I’d certify as safely.
The good news is the law of big numbers is very much in one’s favor. The ability to compromise may be there but it’s in the hundreds of millions of potentially vulnerable users. They just won’t likely get to a tiny fraction of them😀. But this is why I say it’s time for a new phone (and this doesn’t even speak to hardware vulnerabilities that sometimes have no possibility to be patched).
 

Ledsteplin

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I completely understand that view, and respect it, but “safely”, as a matter of degree, is something we’ll have to agree to disagree on. Your smartphone goes back and forth from your home network to potentially various public networks. Your smartphone is likely reaching out to numerous mother ships, so to speak, of various domains in various geographic areas. Your smartphone contains some of your most very sensitive data including one of the pinnacles of compromise:getting to a weak device in your home network..
Security updates after a device no longer supports new OS will be, what we call, best effort (you’ll get patched when it’s possible and feasible).
Ultimately the combination of various networks then back to your own, constant mother ship comms on likely plug n play enabled firewalls, likely potentially weak security (even TLS 1.2 is compromised) on devices in your own network, best effort security patching —>this just doesn’t hit the mark of what I’d certify as safely.
The good news is the law of big numbers is very much in one’s favor. The ability to compromise may be there but it’s in the hundreds of millions of potentially vulnerable users. They just won’t likely get to a tiny fraction of them. But this is why I say it’s time for a new phone (and this doesn’t even speak to hardware vulnerabilities that sometimes have no possibility to be patched).

I've never had a safety/security issue on an unsupported older iPhone. And don't know anyone who has. Even those I know with jailbroken iPhones.
 

Up_And_Away

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I've never had a safety/security issue on an unsupported older iPhone. And don't know anyone who has. Even those I know with jailbroken iPhones.

As mentioned, the law of big numbers is in play. But I just don’t consider the law of big numbers as a viable security plan.
This is very much like a backup. Rarely needed, many people don’t perform them, takes only once to find out you did.
 

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