Did you guys hear Kevin of Crackberry say that nobody at Apple uses 2 hands to type?

cardfan

Well-known member
Oct 26, 2004
2,234
57
48
Visit site
I thought it was a great podcast. Being objective is always good.

One point you lost me on is this idea of "platform champion." That RIM needed this base of enthusiasts. I agree. Same thing with Palm. My only regret is that many long timers over at Treocentral (now webOS nation) got banned for being passionate. If it's a good thing to call them out when they're going the wrong way, well, it's obvious Palm (and then HP) were going many wrong ways. As a result, they were often called on it. That stuff didn't fly in the forums. Instead we saw the ultimate fanboys getting promoted to mods and suspending, or banning others left and right. You even made a club or brigade of such users with cute little badges. Cliques developed within that forum. Debates were discouraged. Being negative about Palm in any way was frowned upon.

It didn't matter how much you contributed over the years or what relationships you had with other users. Mod banned you and that's it. There was no rational discussion to be had. Their way or the highway. Yet on the frontpage or in podcasts, it was anything goes. Two different worlds. I'm sure there's not much left over there now. The only time I really notice is seeing I have hardly any global posts when it should be around 2 or 3k.

I encourage people to champion their platforms but don't be afraid to be objective. Having nothing negative to say is just as nauseating as having nothing positive to say.
 

Ipheuria

Well-known member
Jul 21, 2009
7,356
239
0
Visit site
The things he complained about, in my opinion, were legitimate and some of those complaints have been expressed here in this forum. Being that iMore is primarily a place for iPhone enthusiasts, I can see how his comments might be construed as bashing. Still, he was asked to share his thoughts and he did so without a great deal of restraint. Period. I didn't think he was trying to be disrespectful or anything like that.

I don't fully agree with this. Yes for the most part I found his comments and criticisms to be good and helpful. But on a few ocassions his bias was obvious and he was also blaming the device for user error or knowledge. He complained aobut features being buried and not intuitive which I agree with but don't say Blackberry is any better. This is a personal bias because after using the platform for so long it feels intuitive. I have used a Storm before for a week and to me requiring users to hit the "Blackberry" key for additional options when doing something as simple as adding a contact is not intuitive. Every platform has their inconsistencies, their way of doing things and they aren't intuitive. When he complained about his iPhone still getting iMessages even though the SIM was out and in another device. There is an iMessage setting that you had to enable so it's user error or knowledge that when you're switching to another device you turn off the iMessage feature in settings. In a few instances when he would say Blackberry would be smart enough to do this I felt like it sounded like a personal bias. I think if I was to use a Blackberry I would very well say "Oh the iPhone would definitely have been smart enough to know I wanted to...". It was still a great podcast he had tons of good points and criticisms and interesting things to say.
 

rayz336

Well-known member
Mar 10, 2011
2,645
13
0
Visit site
I don't fully agree with this. Yes for the most part I found his comments and criticisms to be good and helpful. But on a few ocassions his bias was obvious and he was also blaming the device for user error or knowledge. He complained aobut features being buried and not intuitive which I agree with but don't say Blackberry is any better. This is a personal bias because after using the platform for so long it feels intuitive. I have used a Storm before for a week and to me requiring users to hit the "Blackberry" key for additional options when doing something as simple as adding a contact is not intuitive. Every platform has their inconsistencies, their way of doing things and they aren't intuitive. When he complained about his iPhone still getting iMessages even though the SIM was out and in another device. There is an iMessage setting that you had to enable so it's user error or knowledge that when you're switching to another device you turn off the iMessage feature in settings. In a few instances when he would say Blackberry would be smart enough to do this I felt like it sounded like a personal bias. I think if I was to use a Blackberry I would very well say "Oh the iPhone would definitely have been smart enough to know I wanted to...". It was still a great podcast he had tons of good points and criticisms and interesting things to say.

When you switch a SIM card in a Blackberry it does stop receiving BBMs, so it sounded like bias but it was true. The BB key use is pretty much consistent. When I use my Curve, I know that every option I have is under the BB key. It's little things like consistency that make devices that much better. These are things that will make every platform that much better as they are addressed.
 

Just_Me_D

Ambassador Team Leader, Senior Moderator
Moderator
Jan 8, 2012
59,875
669
113
Visit site
I don't fully agree with this.
No problem
Yes for the most part I found his comments and criticisms to be good and helpful.
Me, too.
But on a few ocassions his bias was obvious and he was also blaming the device for user error or knowledge.
That is true, but a majority of complaints about any platform is often in response to what a user haven't figured out how to do or found it inconvenient to do in the current manner.
He complained aobut features being buried and not intuitive which I agree with but don't say Blackberry is any better.
He didn't have to, in my opinion. Ren? asked him for his take on the iPhone and not the other way around. Still, I see what you're saying. :)
This is a personal bias because after using the platform for so long it feels intuitive.
No doubt about it.
I have used a Storm before for a week and to me requiring users to hit the "Blackberry" key for additional options when doing something as simple as adding a contact is not intuitive.
Understood
Every platform has their inconsistencies, their way of doing things and they aren't intuitive.
I agree that every platform has their inconsistencies & way of doing things, but I disagree in regard to them not being intuitive. You stated above that using a platform long enough will feel intuitive and that is true.
When he complained about his iPhone still getting iMessages even though the SIM was out and in another device. There is an iMessage setting that you had to enable so it's user error or knowledge that when you're switching to another device you turn off the iMessage feature in settings.
okay
In a few instances when he would say Blackberry would be smart enough to do this I felt like it sounded like a personal bias.
It is a personal bias, but that doesn't mean it isn't true.
I think if I was to use a Blackberry I would very well say "Oh the iPhone would definitely have been smart enough to know I wanted to...".
(laughing)...I hear ya.
It was still a great podcast he had tons of good points and criticisms and interesting things to say.
I agree and I appreciate your point of view. I really do. Keep speaking your mind, my friend...:)
 

dcjose48

Member
Nov 11, 2012
5
0
0
Visit site
This is my first post here and I am still getting to know the people on the websites, but I have to disagree with one of the criticism Kevin made. He talked about how he messed up setting an alarm on the iPhone and how it could have been avoided if it had a countdown display like android does. Yes I've had android before and did like that feature, but ultimately why not just check after setting the alarm after its set. This just seemed like knit picking to me. Just my 2 cents.
 

rayz336

Well-known member
Mar 10, 2011
2,645
13
0
Visit site
This is my first post here and I am still getting to know the people on the websites, but I have to disagree with one of the criticism Kevin made. He talked about how he messed up setting an alarm on the iPhone and how it could have been avoided if it had a countdown display like android does. Yes I've had android before and did like that feature, but ultimately why not just check after setting the alarm after its set. This just seemed like knit picking to me. Just my 2 cents.

I think it was more of that he was asked about his thoughts on how to change the platform for the better and since he missed something because of an alarm that was set wrong he saw a way to fix that. I think it's a small thing that could go a long way in helping user experience with the device and is something I miss from Android as well.
 

Ipheuria

Well-known member
Jul 21, 2009
7,356
239
0
Visit site
When you switch a SIM card in a Blackberry it does stop receiving BBMs, so it sounded like bias but it was true. ...

I wasn't saying that was a biased opinion for that one I said he was blaming the iPhone for user error or knowledge. The iPhone uses iMessage and there is an option to enable it in the Settings. So a user can't say they didn't know about the option because they had to enable it. If you enabled it then it goes to reason that when you switch the SIM out you also have to disable it because it not only uses your number(text) it also uses your email. The iPhone continued to get the iMessags because it was on Wifi and he didn't disable the feature. I'm not making a big deal out of it I'm just saying there were a few instances where his points weren't 100% valid. I've given my iPhone 4 to my cousin and he doesn't get any of my iMessages because before I handed it over I went through all the settings I know that were enabled or setup and turned them off or removed them.
 

rayz336

Well-known member
Mar 10, 2011
2,645
13
0
Visit site
I wasn't saying that was a biased opinion for that one I said he was blaming the iPhone for user error or knowledge. The iPhone uses iMessage and there is an option to enable it in the Settings. So a user can't say they didn't know about the option because they had to enable it. If you enabled it then it goes to reason that when you switch the SIM out you also have to disable it because it not only uses your number(text) it also uses your email. The iPhone continued to get the iMessags because it was on Wifi and he didn't disable the feature. I'm not making a big deal out of it I'm just saying there were a few instances where his points weren't 100% valid. I've given my iPhone 4 to my cousin and he doesn't get any of my iMessages because before I handed it over I went through all the settings I know that were enabled or setup and turned them off or removed them.

I understand your point but I was just saying that's what he expected to happen and when it didn't he saw it as something that could be made to work more easily. However, I do understand that there are settings will fix this.
 

Ipheuria

Well-known member
Jul 21, 2009
7,356
239
0
Visit site
No problem Me, too. That is true, but a majority of complaints about any platform is often in response to what a user haven't figured out how to do or found it inconvenient to do in the current manner. He didn't have to, in my opinion. Ren? asked him for his take on the iPhone and not the other way around. Still, I see what you're saying. :) No doubt about it. Understood I agree that every platform has their inconsistencies & way of doing things, but I disagree in regard to them not being intuitive. You stated above that using a platform long enough will feel intuitive and that is true. okay It is a personal bias, but that doesn't mean it isn't true. (laughing)...I hear ya.
I agree and I appreciate your point of view. I really do. Keep speaking your mind, my friend...:)

This is definitely a great convo and ultimately I think that is the thing podcasts are made to do is create conversations. What I meant by the platforms having their ways of doing things and it isn't intuitive. Is that as a user becomes familiar with the platform things seem like second nature. I should have used second nature instead of intuitive. So even though the way the platform does things is not intuitive the user has done it so often that they become acustomed to doing it and it feels natural. The way of doing it is still not intuitive for the platform. An example is the way Apple does attachments of pictures in the mail app which I think Kevin mentioned. I've been using iOS for 5 years now and the new method to do it was intro'd in iOS 6 but the other day although I knew there was an easier way for the life of me I could remember it. So I resorted to openning the photos app and copy and past into the email. It's the way I've become accustomed to do it so it's second nature until I re-learn the new easier method. Once I sent the email I suddenly remembered that you tap and hold to choose the input method but if I have to think and try to remember that isn't intuitive. Intuitive is you're in the email you want to attach a photo you tap an icon with a paper clip and then choose your photo done. It's something that you do instinctively because a paper clip is used to attach things to paper documents and using all sorts of other clients that is the attachment method.
 

Ipheuria

Well-known member
Jul 21, 2009
7,356
239
0
Visit site
I understand your point but I was just saying that's what he expected to happen and when it didn't he saw it as something that could be made to work more easily. However, I do understand that there are settings will fix this.

got ya
 

Just_Me_D

Ambassador Team Leader, Senior Moderator
Moderator
Jan 8, 2012
59,875
669
113
Visit site
This is definitely a great convo and ultimately I think that is the thing podcasts are made to do is create conversations. What I meant by the platforms having their ways of doing things and it isn't intuitive. Is that as a user becomes familiar with the platform things seem like second nature. I should have used second nature instead of intuitive. So even though the way the platform does things is not intuitive the user has done it so often that they become acustomed to doing it and it feels natural. The way of doing it is still not intuitive for the platform. An example is the way Apple does attachments of pictures in the mail app which I think Kevin mentioned. I've been using iOS for 5 years now and the new method to do it was intro'd in iOS 6 but the other day although I knew there was an easier way for the life of me I could remember it. So I resorted to openning the photos app and copy and past into the email. It's the way I've become accustomed to do it so it's second nature until I re-learn the new easier method. Once I sent the email I suddenly remembered that you tap and hold to choose the input method but if I have to think and try to remember that isn't intuitive. Intuitive is you're in the email you want to attach a photo you tap an icon with a paper clip and then choose your photo done. It's something that you do instinctively because a paper clip is used to attach things to paper documents and using all sorts of other clients that is the attachment method.

Understood. Great example, by the way....:)
 

Ipheuria

Well-known member
Jul 21, 2009
7,356
239
0
Visit site
Thanks I was going to bring up Twitter too talk about un-intuitive fitting a sentence into 140 characters makes for the worst lingo ever lol.
 

Trending Posts

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
260,758
Messages
1,768,168
Members
441,265
Latest member
vber