Callsheet is an essential iPhone and iPad app for movie lovers

Apr 21, 2024
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I tried Callsheet, but I'm not sure if I'm ready to commit to a subscription. It bugs me that even in the demo, they restrict how many searches you can do. Like, seriously? I'd rather stick to the free version of IMDB where I can search all day long without having to pay extra for something that's available for free elsewhere. Just my two cents! 🤷‍♀️
 

EdwinG

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Mar 10, 2012
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I tried Callsheet, but I'm not sure if I'm ready to commit to a subscription. It bugs me that even in the demo, they restrict how many searches you can do. Like, seriously? I'd rather stick to the free version of IMDB where I can search all day long without having to pay extra for something that's available for free elsewhere. Just my two cents! 🤷‍♀️

Casey Liss, Callsheet’s sole developer, did explain publicly why he is limiting searches, and requiring a subscription.

Long story short: avoiding the Reddit situation that happened last year with Apollo.
 

EdwinG

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Where can I read about it?
It was on at least two Accidental Tech Podcast episodes.

ATP episode 547: https://overcast.fm/+R7DVzvwg4/49:52
ATP episode 529: https://overcast.fm/+R7DV08dWk/1:43:36


What do you mean by: "Long story short: The Reddit situation that happened last year with Apollo should be avoided."?
In May 2023, Reddit decided to charge an enormous amount for API access that was originally free.

Apps like Apollo got stuck to shutdown instead of facing a monthy $2 million invoice, because they had no way to cover for the new fees in an immediate manner.
 
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Apr 21, 2024
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Hey there,

After having to juggle a lot for the family (phew), I finally have some time to reply.

First of all, thank you so much for taking the time to find the key points in the podcasts for me, so I could jump right into the crucial parts.

If I understood everything correctly, the developer justifies the subscription for the app partly due to ongoing costs and partly due to the risk of the data access, or the interface, unexpectedly cutting off. Maybe he mentioned another argument that I missed. But essentially, the costs and the business risk are the rationale behind the subscription.

I totally get that, if I were in his shoes.

But as a user, what interests me is the price and the quality/value of the app, so the price-performance ratio. And that's where Callsheet falls short. A one-time price, depending on the amount, would still be okay, but a subscription, mind you, is not worth it for me. There are free alternatives that are just as good.

So, unfortunately, my opinion hasn't changed after listening to those two podcasts. Even though, as I said, I understand the desire to build up a financial cushion to protect against downtime.

I hope I'm not stepping on anyone's toes with this, it's just my opinion.