Bloomberg: Apple unknowingly gave customer information to hackers

Up_And_Away

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Agreed that a user should keep in mind what any company stores on you. But size matters. The data Apple has specific to a user is surprisingly limited. For Facebook, the data they have specific to a user would fill up a volume of encyclopedias.
 

Wotchered

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Agreed that a user should keep in mind what any company stores on you. But size matters. The data Apple has specific to a user is surprisingly limited. For Facebook, the data they have specific to a user would fill up a volume of encyclopedias.

Everything a serious hacker would need is going to be able to fit on one screen,as for data,all that is needed is where to look.
 

Up_And_Away

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Name, address, DOB and some other first page identifiers are easy to find without having to gain illegal access to a company’s db/dbs. Arguably too easy that this information is attainable so readily.
One’s credit card info is much harder to find on the internet and this definitely could be valuable information from illegal access to a corp db including Apple. However, The point I was making is what info will be available to ‘hack’ beyond that first page matters, it matters a lot. Apple chooses to anonymize most data collection. Your Apple Health app info, your Apple Maps info, to name a few. Illegal access to Apple’s dbs will net little information specific to you. That is in stark contrast to the very specific voluminous data about you that would be found at Facebook or Google or even now Amazon.
You said “trust no one”, I agree. But I have to semi-trust to use my personal electronics. So one company not having a huge file on me is extremely important to me. If it isn’t to you, we’ll just disagree on it’s importance. (All companies mentioned will provide emailed copies to you of your personal data on file. It is an interesting walk down ‘incredibly large personal information boulevard’ for 3 out of 4 of those mentioned companies).
 

Annie_M

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I was given a subscription to Ancestry.com a couple of years ago by my nephew. I was eagerly filling in all sorts of things, including my name, DOB, location, etc. I also filled in things like my Mother's maiden name, DOB as well as my Father's info. I asked my husband what his father's birthday was, and he was alarmed. He reminded me of the epidemic of identity theft and said that I was nuts to fill all that in... and he's a genealogy enthusiast. So I stopped and deleted as much as I could, but I was sad... sad that there are criminals out there who steal our identity. This is why we can't have nice things! :(
 

Wotchered

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I was given a subscription to Ancestry.com a couple of years ago by my nephew. I was eagerly filling in all sorts of things, including my name, DOB, location, etc. I also filled in things like my Mother's maiden name, DOB as well as my Father's info. I asked my husband what his father's birthday was, and he was alarmed. He reminded me of the epidemic of identity theft and said that I was nuts to fill all that in... and he's a genealogy enthusiast. So I stopped and deleted as much as I could, but I was sad... sad that there are criminals out there who steal our identity. This is why we can't have nice things! :(

I very much agree, there are many things I would like to play with that are precluded by security issues like this.
 

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