Apple deliberately slows old iPhones! A story of good reasons and dumb, dumb messaging

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For years I swore to friends and family that Apple wasn't deliberately slowing old iPhones. I was wrong. But I don't feel bad — Apple's reasoning was sound. But their lack of communication and transparency around a smart decision was just so dumb.


Full story from the iMore Blog...
 

edd

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So if I replace the battery on my iPhone 6, will I notice a performance increase? What isn’t clear is if the updates throttle performance on the basis of the phone model, or if it senses that the battery is truly aging and not what it used to be. These stories aren’t explaining that.

I think I bought my 6 four years ago so replacing the original battery sounds like it might be worth the trouble.
 

calebt

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From what I read the software detects a degraded battery performance and throttle back the CPU. So if you change your battery you will be back at peak performance on you iPhone 6.
 

Ledsteplin

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So if I replace the battery on my iPhone 6, will I notice a performance increase? What isn’t clear is if the updates throttle performance on the basis of the phone model, or if it senses that the battery is truly aging and not what it used to be. These stories aren’t explaining that.

I think I bought my 6 four years ago so replacing the original battery sounds like it might be worth the trouble.

A new battery at Apple will cost $80. Instead, why not upgrade to a newer model? You can probably get a good deal on an iPhone 7. You might check with your carrier and see what options they offer.
 

edd

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A new battery at Apple will cost $80. Instead, why not upgrade to a newer model? You can probably get a good deal on an iPhone 7. You might check with your carrier and see what options they offer.

A nearby shop will do it for $50 in 10 minutes or I could buy one on Amazon and do it for $25. I’ll certainly look at new phone deals before pulling the trigger but new iPhones are expensive.

Hopefully, Calebt is correct about the battery.
 

Ledsteplin

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A nearby shop will do it for $50 in 10 minutes or I could buy one on Amazon and do it for $25. I’ll certainly look at new phone deals before pulling the trigger but new iPhones are expensive.

Hopefully, Calebt is correct about the battery.
Yep, can do that as well. But those batteries don't seem to have the life an Apple battery offers.
 

wilber1

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A new battery at Apple will cost $80. Instead, why not upgrade to a newer model? You can probably get a good deal on an iPhone 7. You might check with your carrier and see what options they offer.

Exactly what Apple would like you to do after they update your phone .
 

anon(41073)

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I am not buying the phone slowing down due to battery degradation. After selling my iPhone 7 and S7 Edge, I was using a brand new iPhone 6. The 32GB version which came out this year. I bought it in August. After IOS 11, it slowed to a crawl with a battery that was a couple of months old at the most. I had to deal with it until I bought the X. I am not sure that if one was to replace the battery that it would fix anything.
 

Rob Phillips

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I am not buying the phone slowing down due to battery degradation. After selling my iPhone 7 and S7 Edge, I was using a brand new iPhone 6. The 32GB version which came out this year. I bought it in August. After IOS 11, it slowed to a crawl with a battery that was a couple of months old at the most. I had to deal with it until I bought the X. I am not sure that if one was to replace the battery that it would fix anything.

Your slowdown was more likely the result of going from an iPhone 7 to an iPhone 6. It doesn’t mean battery degradation doesn’t also slow devices down.
 

anon(41073)

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Your slowdown was more likely the result of going from an iPhone 7 to an iPhone 6. It doesn’t mean battery degradation doesn’t also slow devices down.

That wasn't the case from just going back to an iPhone 6. After going to IOS 11, it would take a few seconds for some apps to open. This wasn't occurring on IOS 10. I am talking about tapping on an app and literally waiting seconds(3 or 4) for it to open.
 

Rob Phillips

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That wasn't the case from just going back to an iPhone 6. After going to IOS 11, it would take a few seconds for some apps to open. This wasn't occurring on IOS 10. I am talking about tapping on an app and literally waiting seconds for it to open.

Aaah gotcha. Probably a software or hardware issue with your particular device then. Otherwise we’d be flooded with complaints from iPhone 6 users.
 

anon(41073)

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Aaah gotcha. Probably a software or hardware issue with your particular device then. Otherwise we’d be flooded with complaints from iPhone 6 users.

I don't know exactly what was going on but a couple of coworkers and their kids were having the same problem. The only difference were their's were bought around original launch and mine was fairly new. My point is new and old batteries, same results.
 

Rob Phillips

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I don't know exactly what was going on but a couple of coworkers and their kids were having the same problem. The only difference were their's were bought around original launch and mine was fairly new. My point is new and old batteries, same results.

Either way I’ve lost some trust in Apple over this. I’m an annual upgrader so none of this really concerns me but the fact that Apple would throttle devices, whether it be due to old batteries or old phones, and hide it from customers is troubling. Apple got caught with its hands in the cookie jar and that’s the only reason they even admitted to degrading performance. What else could they be hiding?
 

Ledsteplin

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That wasn't the case from just going back to an iPhone 6. After going to IOS 11, it would take a few seconds for some apps to open. This wasn't occurring on IOS 10. I am talking about tapping on an app and literally waiting seconds(3 or 4) for it to open.

My 6s Plus does that on iOS 10.1.1. Not always, but many times I tap an icon, and it seems to freeze a second or two before opening. That started when I first updated to iOS 10. But, generally, my speeds are fine. According to the Battery Life app, I'm at around 75% life. But I don't notice any slowdown at all.
 

anon(50597)

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Either way I’ve lost some trust in Apple over this. I’m an annual upgrader so none of this really concerns me but the fact that Apple would throttle devices, whether it be due to old batteries or old phones, and hide it from customers is troubling. Apple got caught with its hands in the cookie jar and that’s the only reason they even admitted to degrading performance. What else could they be hiding?

I guess there’s different ways to look at it.
I’m not sure why they would hide it. It says they improved battery life and prevented phones from crashing right in the upgrade notes. What would they gain by hiding it?
 

Quis89

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I guess there’s different ways to look at it.
I’m not sure why they would hide it. It says they improved battery life and prevented phones from crashing right in the upgrade notes. What would they gain by hiding it?

What would they gain by hiding the fact that a new battery could potentially add additional life to our smart phones that was lost as our batteries aged???? The software update literally throttled our devices. The reasoning makes perfect sense. Nobody is arguing that. But the fact that phones were throttled without us knowing as a fix for something that a new battery could resolve is an issue. You guys have to see how this is problematic?

If I don't know that replacing my battery will resolve my slowness, I would instead purchase an entirely new phone. Apple would MUCH rather I buy a new phone from them than replace my battery and continue with my old device.

A new battery at Apple will cost $80. Instead, why not upgrade to a newer model? You can probably get a good deal on an iPhone 7. You might check with your carrier and see what options they offer.

This seems to be exactly what Apple is banking on, lol. There is a HUGE price difference between $80 and buying a new iPhone 7. There isn't a deal on the planet that will make that a comparable move, lol. At minimum you may find a 7 for $500. That's a $420 difference to resolve something that $80 could fix. That'd be why one wouldn't upgrade to a newer model.
 

anon(50597)

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What would they gain by hiding the fact that a new battery could potentially add additional life to our smart phones that was lost as our batteries aged???? The software update literally throttled our devices. The reasoning makes perfect sense. Nobody is arguing that. But the fact that phones were throttled without us knowing as a fix for something that a new battery could resolve is an issue. You guys have to see how this is problematic?

If I don't know that replacing my battery will resolve my slowness, I would instead purchase an entirely new phone. Apple would MUCH rather I buy a new phone from them than replace my battery and continue with my old device.

I understand your frustration. But I do think that most phone batteries, over a couple of years of charging cycles, are at the point of replacement. I would be interested what your battery life was like. It certainly was easier in the days of non sealed batteries to just throw another one in, that’s for sure.
I don’t have a problem with the fact they could/should have explained it better even though they spoke about it in the update notes. It would have alleviated any surprises. I just don’t think it was done maliciously or to get people to buy newer devices, unless I’m proven wrong.
Best of luck to you.
 

Quis89

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I understand your frustration. But I do think that most phone batteries, over a couple of years of charging cycles, are at the point of replacement. I would be interested what your battery life was like. It certainly was easier in the days of non sealed batteries to just throw another one in, that’s for sure.
I don’t have a problem with the fact they could/should have explained it better even though they spoke about it in the update notes. It would have alleviated any surprises. I just don’t think it was done maliciously or to get people to buy newer devices, unless I’m proven wrong.
Best of luck to you.

Not sure that proof will ever come. But I'm sure many phone upgrades have taken place due to poor performance that could have been resolved with a battery replacement. That's the only issue I have here. The lack of transparency. Apple throttled phones. This is a fact. Their reasoning is one thing. But at the end of the day we know they throttled devices. And without the knowledge that they A) knowingly throttled devices and B) did it to ensure our devices ran smoothly, people may have spent money they didn't need to.

In my opinion, they were wrong. I imagine I'm not alone considering a class-action lawsuit has already begun. I upgrade annually so this wouldn't have really affected me. I just have an issue with companies hiding information that could affect how we spend our money.
 

anon(50597)

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Not sure that proof will ever come. But I'm sure many phone upgrades have taken place due to poor performance that could have been resolved with a battery replacement. That's the only issue I have here. The lack of transparency. Apple throttled phones. This is a fact. Their reasoning is one thing. But at the end of the day we know they throttled devices. And without the knowledge that they A) knowingly throttled devices and B) did it to ensure our devices ran smoothly, people may have spent money they didn't need to.

In my opinion, they were wrong. I imagine I'm not alone considering a class-action lawsuit has already begun. I upgrade annually so this wouldn't have really affected me. I just have an issue with companies hiding information that could affect how we spend our money.

I agree that companies should not hide things from customers that may affect them. I don’t have a problem with that. I think they should have been more transparent.

As far as a class action lawsuit meaning many people think Apple did something wrong? People will sue over anything they think will make them 50 cents. It means a bunch of greedy people and lawyers trying to make a name for themselves have dollar signs flashing in front of their eyes. I find these trivial lawsuits embarrassing to our society when we have actual problems that we ignore. But that’s for another day and a different forum.

JMHO.
 

Quis89

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I agree that companies should not hide things from customers that may affect them. I don’t have a problem with that. I think they should have been more transparent.

As far as a class action lawsuit meaning many people think Apple did something wrong? People will sue over anything they think will make them 50 cents. It means a bunch of greedy people and lawyers trying to make a name for themselves have dollar signs flashing in front of their eyes. I find these trivial lawsuits embarrassing to our society when we have actual problems that we ignore. But that’s for another day and a different forum.

JMHO.

Yea, possibly. I personally don't find it trivial though. I think a case could be made that some customers who experienced slowdowns upgraded because they felt the reasons were ONLY age of their devices. All the while, it's actually the software intentionally slowing the phone down to compensate for the age of the battery. Thankfully, now we have the knowledge necessary to make the best decision. Upgrade or new battery? That knowledge wasn't readily available prior to all of this.

But that's just my opinion. And I think we agree that more transparency could have been had here. :yes:
 

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