1. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    How do you know that? How could you possibly know that to be factually true?

    Just curious.
    Being that I have never been a slave, I cannot provide personal experience and neither can you to the contrary. Having said that, common sense dictate that unlike nations of people who became slaves after being conquered, whereas slaves were darn near innumerable, American slaves were a commodity and an investment. People take care of their investments.
    Ledsteplin likes this.
    07-05-2015 12:10 PM
  2. Soeasy's Avatar
    Being that I have never been a slave, I cannot provide personal experience and neither can you to the contrary.
    I never professed to have any ability to comment on the conditions of African slaves in this country. Your statement seems to indicate that you do. so I asked.

    As for common sense. Well I'd prefer facts over someone's interpretation of what common sense is or isn't.

    Your assertions aren't vetted out by the facts.
    07-05-2015 12:20 PM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    You're misconstruing the context of my post.
    Nope. I am not.

    I never said it should be flown ANYWHERE. I said it shouldn't be flown on State Capital Buildings that are supposed to represent ALL of it's constituency.
    True, but neither did I. I asked why shouldn't it be flown?

    That Capital building is funded by the tax payers of that state.
    Then it's safe to conclude that those taxpayers include those who prefer the flag to continue being displayed.

    Example:

    Let's say all the African Americans in SC decided that they did NOT want their tax dollars used to provide funding for maintenance, staff and upkeep of the State Capital Building as long as that flag were flown there. Should they have the right to say where there tax dollars go?
    They have the right to voice their opinion, but they do not have the right to decide the fate of something that everyone in the State pays for, at least not without winning a majority vote that everyone participated in.
    i'm here in NYC. I honestly don't care about the flag itself.
    Your replies indicate differently.

    I'm more engrossed in the theory of the principle behind it.

    And you're correct, we do welcome everyone. During the World Cup, you can't walk into a bar in the city that's not playing the games and everyone is wearing the colors and flags of their countries.

    But those flags aren't flown at City Hall here, nor at the State Capital Building in Albany.

    You're throwing everything in to the pot and trying to make an argumens without looking at the individual parts of what you're asserting.

    Just my two cents.

    Happy Sunday to you.
    I threw everything into the pot, as you put it, to show how ridiculous the Confederate flag controversy really is. Anyway, that's my 2, and Happy Sunday to you, too.
    07-05-2015 12:20 PM
  4. Just_Me_D's Avatar

    Your assertions aren't vetted out by the facts.
    So when you make Comments like the ones below, you're stating 'facts' and not unvetted opinions, right?

    White Wall street guys hate everybody than is not a White Male. Asians, Middle Easterners, Jews(but never to their faces. Because they would say the Jews run everything), Arabs, Women(even the white ones. Unless they're trying to sleep with them, so women become objects of conquest) etc...
    07-05-2015 12:29 PM
  5. Soeasy's Avatar
    I never saw Roots.

    But, I did have a concentration in sociololgy while pusuing my Masters.

    I have to say that I when individuals use terms like 'most', I grind my teeth.

    You have ZERO emperical data to base that statement on anything other than your own personal speculation and opinion. And yet, you state it as an absolute fact of history that "most"(being at least 51% or the majority) were not actually treated poorly. Or treated like slaves.

    I would say that since there are numerous actual records or male slave owners fathering illegitmate children(including several of our Presidents), numerous actual records of slaves as young as 9 being sold away from their families. Actual records of extremely young females slaves being used solely for the purposes of sex by slave owners, numerous actual records of males slaves and forced breeding, where the female would be tied and bent over a bench and the 'bucks' would be lined up in the attempts to impregnate said female, I could just as likely claim that what you believe isn't actually a matter of historical record.

    And, since you say "Roots" was wrong. I'd kindly ask you to provide information or data to back up that claim.
    Last edited by Soeasy; 07-05-2015 at 12:55 PM. Reason: typos
    07-05-2015 12:34 PM
  6. Soeasy's Avatar
    So when you make Comments like the ones below, you're stating 'facts' and not unvetted opinions, right?
    Because those were my actual/factual experiences. Locker rooms, dinners, airplanes, meetings. Conference rooms. Strategy meetings.

    These were my actual experiences.

    Example:

    When I was an Asset Manager at JPMorgan Chase, my Senior Vice President told a group of us(white males) that there was a certain woman in the office that he wanted to 'bang'. That was 9 years ago and I still remember his quote to this day.

    "She's the only Asian I've ever seen that doesn't look like she'd been hit the face with a frying pan."

    And I rose through the ranks at different firms, Morgan Stanley, Smith Barney, etc... on my way to Managing Director, I can repeat that same experience 100s of times. Gays, Lesbians, Blacks, Hispanics, hell I'm sure they'd find a reason to hate goldfish.

    My observation, coupled with the observation that minorities/women often received less pay and were promoted less ofter, is borne out by actual experiences.

    I was never a slave and have had no interactions with one. To the best of my knowledge.

    So I would never assert to know what the life of one was/is like.
    Last edited by Soeasy; 07-05-2015 at 12:56 PM. Reason: typos
    07-05-2015 12:49 PM
  7. dchandler's Avatar
    I agree with what Charlie Daniels has said about this whole issue. I think the flag does represent a bit of defiance against untruths spoken about southerners over the years. I see it on Twitter all the time. We get called "Racists" just because we live in the South. There's definitely that element. And they are wrong. We're not like that at all. Here's what Mr. Daniels had to say:

    "The recent senseless act of slaughter in a church in Charleston, South Carolina awakened America to the ever-present lunacy and evil that walks among us, and it has also reopened some old wounds and deep feelings on both sides of a long festering situation.

    Before I go any farther with this piece, I wish to express my love and admiration for the people of Charleston, who have, in the face of immense pain, shown a restraint and a common sense seldom seen in tragic situations involving race.

    When I saw the pictures of the people who had been murdered, I made the statement, "I know these people," which I didn't mean literally, but figuratively. They were the kind of Christian people I have been around all my life worked with and sat in the pews of churches with salt of the earth folks, who not only professed to know the Lord Jesus Christ, but lived their faith every day of their lives.

    These are the kind of people you want to have praying for you, the kind who know how to put their arms around a hurting person and comfort and console. They are the kind of people who raised their families to turn to Almighty God in times of trouble and heartbreak, proven by the forgiving words spoken by family members in court to the monster who had wantonly murdered their loved ones.

    As in all Satan inspired iniquity, God has the ability to bring great good, and in this situation, the people of Charleston, South Carolina have shown the depth of common sense and class that exists in that community. More importantly, they showed the world what being a Christian is all about.

    I feel sure that a jury of peers in South Carolina will see that Dylann Roof gets whats coming to him, and justice will be served and meted out to the full extent of the law.

    In relation to the main crux of my column today, I would like to relate an experience I had in a Midwestern city when the band was appearing with the local symphony orchestra.

    In the evening before the show started, one of the venue staff came to me and said, "There is a gentleman out front who is offended by the confederate flag on your piano."

    I responded that we didn't have a Confederate flag painted on our piano.

    The upshot of the whole thing was that Taz, our keyboard player, had an American flag and a Tennessee flag with the flagstaffs crossed on the front of his piano, with a drawing of his namesake, a cartoon Tasmanian Devil, and the phrase "Yessiree, Tennessee" painted under it.

    The point I'm making is that this gentleman was probably the kind of person who looks for something to be offended about and sees things that aren't even there.

    Of course, the situation concerning the Confederate flag in Charleston is a much more serious situation with justifiable feelings that go back a century and a half, and the problem has the potential to be a racially divisive one.

    The bottom line is that the flag in question represents one thing to some people and another thing to others.

    Far be it from me to advise the people of South Carolina or any other state as to what they should fly over their capitol buildings, or anywhere else in the state for that matter, but I truly hate to see the opportunists move in and create a symbol of hate out of a simple piece of cloth.

    Of course, we know most politicians are going to chime in and glean whatever political hay that is available, but in my book, the corporate rush to rid their shelves of anything with the Confederate battle flag on it is pure hypocrisy.

    If they felt that deeply about the subject, they should have done something years ago, and I notice they have no problem accepting the profits from the merchandise they have on hand.

    I have received many requests to do interviews on this subject and had a lot of tweets asking me to comment, but I declined, wanting to take the time to explain my feelings in detail, without having to answer other people's loaded questions or express myself in a 140-character limit on Twitter.

    This will have the potential to be lengthy, so bear with me and I will try my best to relate my honest feelings on the Confederate flag in question, which was actually the battle flag carried by several Confederate army regiments and was not the official flag of the Confederacy.

    I was born in 1936, a mere 71 years after the Civil War ended, when the South was looked upon by what seemed to be a majority of the Northern States as an inbred, backward, uneducated, slow-talking and slower-thinking people, with low morals and a propensity for incest.

    This was in the days before television, and about all the folks up North knew about Southerners was what they heard. There were a lot of people who took great pleasure in proliferating the myth, and some still do it to this day.

    As you might suppose, people in the South bitterly resented this attitude of superiority, and in some quarters the words damn and Yankee became one word. And a somewhat fierce type of Southern pride came into being.

    The Confederate battle flag was a sign of defiance, a sign of pride, a declaration of a geographical area that you were proud to be from.

    Thats all it is to me and all it has ever been to me.

    I cant speak for all, but I know in my heart that most Southerners feel the same way.

    I have no desire to reinstate the Confederacy. I oppose slavery as vehemently as any man, and I believe that every human being, regardless of the color of their skin, is just as valuable as I am and deserves the exact same rights and advantages as I do.

    I feel that this controversy desperately needs to be settled without federal interference and input from race baiters like Al Sharpton. It's up to the individual states as to what they allow to be a part of their public image. What the majority of the people of any given state want should, in my opinion, be their policy.

    Unfortunately, the Confederate battle flag has been adopted by hate groups and individuals like Dylann Roof to supposedly represent them and their hateful view of the races.

    Please believe me when I say that, to the overwhelming majority of Southerners, the flag represents no such thing, but is simply a banner denoting an area of the nation and one's pride in living there.

    I know there will be those who will take these words of mine, try to twist them or call them insincere and try to make what I've said here some kind of anti-black racial statement, but I tell everybody who reads this article, I came up in the days of cruel racial prejudice and Jim Crow laws, when the courts were tilted against any black man, when the segregated educational system was inferior and when opportunities for blacks to advance were almost nonexistent.

    I lived through the useless cruelty of those days and did not get my feelings out of some sensitivity class or social studies course, but made my own decisions out of experience and disgust.

    I hold no ill feelings and have no axes to grind with my brothers and sisters of any color. The same God made us; the same God will judge us; and I pray that He will intervene in the deep racial divide we have in this nation and make each person black or white see each other for what we truly are, human beings. No better, and no worse.

    It's time to do away with labels: Caucasian-American, African-American, Asian-American, Native American and so forth.

    How about just a simple "AMERICAN"?

    What do you think?

    Pray for our troops and the peace of Jerusalem.

    God Bless America

    Charlie Daniels"
    Very well said
    07-05-2015 12:51 PM
  8. Just_Me_D's Avatar

    "She's the only Asian I've ever seen that doesn't look like she'd been hit the face with a frying pan."
    That comment is at most a bad attempt to be funny. Hate-filled toward Asians? Nope.

    And I rose through the ranks at different firms, Morgan Stanley, Smith Barney, etc... on my way to Managing Director, I can repeat that same experience 100s of times. Gays, Lesbians, Blacks, Hispanics, hell I'm sure they'd find a reason to hate goldfish.
    I take that to mean you were complicit and didn't speak out against the behavior while rising through the ranks?
    07-05-2015 01:07 PM
  9. Soeasy's Avatar
    That comment is at most a bad attempt to be funny. Hate-filled toward Asians? Nope.



    I take that to mean you were complicit and didn't speak out against the behavior while rising through the ranks?
    You think an Asian would feel that way. And honestly, again, how do you know how he felt about Asians or anyone else for that matter?

    My opinion is based on my observations having worked very closely with him for 3 years.

    Yours is based on how you've interpreted a comment he made that I conveyed to you.

    It might be interpreted that you are prone to believe what you believe without the need for facts of any sort. And that's completely within your rights to do so.

    Absolutely! My own survival was my paramount concern! I was a young man who wholeheartedly believed that Capitalism was the answer to all the worlds evils. Like socialism and collectivism. LOL!

    Fast foward 18 years: I'm a partner in my own consulting firm now and not afraid of losing a paycheck or having someone more powerful/influential than myself crush my career with the snap of their fingers.

    I'm older, and hopefully wiser. And understand that, sometimes we have to stand up for our fellow man when he's unable to stand up for himself.

    Even if it means ruffling a few feathers.
    07-05-2015 01:28 PM
  10. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    You think an Asian would feel that way.
    I have no doubt that some would.
    And honestly, again, how do you know how he felt about Asians or anyone else for that matter?
    I don't, and unless he stated to you that he hated Asians or non-whites, neither do you.

    My opinion is based on my observations having worked very closely with him for 3 years.
    It is still only an 'opinion'.

    Yours is based on how you've interpreted a comment he made that I conveyed to you.
    That's true and that's why I stated, "That comment..."

    It might be interpreted that you are prone to believe what you believe without the need for facts of any sort. And that's completely within your rights to do so.
    I suppose that's possible, but then again, I try not to put my foot in my mouth too often.

    Absolutely! My own survival was my paramount concern!
    Could you not have found another job and still survive?
    I was a young man who wholeheartedly believed that Capitalism was the answer to all the worlds evils. Like socialism and collectivism. LOL!
    That's not funny, but I get what you're saying......Anyway, the only thing, off the top of my head, that we should collectively have in common are rights, opportunities and choices.

    Fast foward 18 years: I'm a partner in my own consulting firm now and not afraid of losing a paycheck or having someone more powerful/influential than myself crush my career with the snap of their fingers.
    So the example you used earlier in regard to Asians is from things that occurred almost 2 decades ago?

    I'm older, and hopefully wiser. And understand that, sometimes we have to stand up for our fellow man when he's unable to stand up for himself.

    Even if it means ruffling a few feathers.
    I agree, but standing up in favor of removing the Confederate flag isn't standing up for the little man. That's being cowardice, and bowing down to the divisive schemes of people with hidden motives. It's succumbing to the notion of others deciding that you should be offended by something that you truly aren't offended by.
    07-05-2015 01:52 PM
  11. Soeasy's Avatar

    1.) I have no doubt that some would. I don't, and unless he stated to you that he hated Asians or non-whites, neither do you.

    2.) It is still only an 'opinion'.

    3.) That's true and that's why I stated, "That comment..."

    4.) I suppose that's possible, but then again, I try not to put my foot in my mouth too often.

    5.) Could you not have found another job and still survive? That's not funny, but I get what you're saying......Anyway, the only thing, off the top of my head, that we should collectively have in common are rights, opportunities and choices.

    5.) So the example you used earlier in regard to Asians is from things that occurred almost 2 decades ago?

    6.) I agree, but standing up in favor of removing the Confederate flag isn't standing up for the little man. That's being cowardice, and bowing down to the divisive schemes of people with hidden motives. It's succumbing to the notion of others deciding that you should be offended by something that you truly aren't offended by.
    1.) Factually Incorrect. I DO know that he felt the vast majority of Asians appeared to have been hit in the face with a hard object. The result of which made them quite repulsive. To him at least. That much, with regards to his opinions, I know to be factually true.

    2.) Factually Correct. But I do have some measure of corroborating evidence to support my opinion.

    5.) That was my "initiation" into the prevailing culture. So it was the one that had the most impact on me mentally. There aren't enough pages on this cite to cover every example of the next decade and more. I could give you one from this past April where a Merrill Lynch Broker asked that we not send my partner to a meeting in Kentucky because he felt the client would object to the Jewishness or my colleague. Needless to say we advise him that if his client had/has a problem with my partner's ethnicity, we are not interested in taking him on a client. But it caused us to wonder, in the office, was it the client who had a problem with Jews or was it the ML Broker.

    6.) One could argue that cowardice is not acknowledging the atrocities of the American slave trade, and the impact that period in history still has on AA in this country.

    One could feasibly argue that statements such as "American slavery was a cake walk compared..." "Most slaves were treated as family members..." derives from the fear or cowardice of facing the awful truth of the situation. And it's ongoing legacy...

    I don't live in SC. I don't know how all African Americans in SC feel about the flag. I do know that some have voiced a very vocal opposition to it.

    Guessing as to what some feel or don't feel without any evidence to support it is an exercise in futility.

    To me at least.
    07-05-2015 02:34 PM
  12. mmcfly23's Avatar
    Most slave owners treated their slaves well. What you saw in "Roots" was the exception. Most were treated as family. So, yeah, 'D is right about that.
    You can't be serious.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    MightyHollywood likes this.
    07-05-2015 02:45 PM
  13. mmcfly23's Avatar
    The flag is apart of America's history. Should it be flown on state buildings? Imo, I'd have to say no and that's based on what I know and my family's perception of the flag.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    07-05-2015 02:48 PM
  14. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    You can't be serious.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Most lived and grew up together. The kids played together. There were a few bad apples. But, yeah, most plantation owners treated them well. It was a way of life. After slavery was abolished, many slaves stayed where they were. It was home. The biggest tragedy was the 300,000 African slaves that died on the way across the Atlantic of disease or overcrowding. A third of them died.
    07-05-2015 03:04 PM
  15. mmcfly23's Avatar
    I also understand that the flag represents "southern pride" for a lot of Americans. I'm not offended nor do I feel a certain way whenever i see the flag. I can understand arguments from both sides of the spectrum.
    07-05-2015 03:07 PM
  16. mmcfly23's Avatar
    Most lived and grew up together. The kids played together. There were a few bad apples. But, yeah, most plantation owners treated them well. It was a way of life. After slavery was abolished, many slaves stayed where they were. It was home. The biggest tragedy was the 300,000 African slaves that died on the way across the Atlantic of disease or overcrowding. A third of them died.
    The slaves stayed where they were because they had no choice. They weren't seen as equals in this society. My mother's side of the family is from the south, while my father and his family is from the west indies. 2 parents, 2 different languages, yet the stories from both are very similar (as far as how blacks and slaves were treated). I don't want to hijack this thread and make it about slavery, however to say that slavery wasn't that bad in America is laughable at best.
    07-05-2015 03:14 PM
  17. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    The slaves stayed where they were because they had no choice. They weren't seen as equals in this society. My mother's side of the family is from the south, while my father and his family is from the west indies. 2 parents, 2 different languages, yet the stories from both are very similar (as far as how blacks and slaves were treated). I don't want to hijack this thread and make it about slavery, however to say that slavery wasn't that bad in America is laughable at best.
    Many didn't have a choice. Some did. And many that did stay were given land. I'm not saying nothing bad ever happened or that it was OK. Just that it wasn't all like in 'Roots'.
    07-05-2015 03:35 PM
  18. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    1.) Factually Incorrect. I DO know that he felt the vast majority of Asians appeared to have been hit in the face with a hard object. The result of which made them quite repulsive. To him at least. That much, with regards to his opinions, I know to be factually true.
    That statement/opinion does not prove that he hated Asians. Come on, man. You know this!

    2.) Factually Correct. But I do have some measure of corroborating evidence to support my opinion.
    What 'evidence'? The statement above is not evidence of hatred.

    5.) That was my "initiation" into the prevailing culture. So it was the one that had the most impact on me mentally. There aren't enough pages on this cite to cover every example of the next decade and more. I could give you one from this past April where a Merrill Lynch Broker asked that we not send my partner to a meeting in Kentucky because he felt the client would object to the Jewishness or my colleague. Needless to say we advise him that if his client had/has a problem with my partner's ethnicity, we are not interested in taking him on a client. But it caused us to wonder, in the office, was it the client who had a problem with Jews or was it the ML Broker.
    I understand, but even the example you use here is not an example of hatred. It's like being in the advertising business and you have to choose between a good looking white person with perfect teeth and a good looking black person with crooked teeth to be featured smiling on a billboard. Are you being racist for not picking the black person or is it a smart business decision?

    6.) One could argue that cowardice is not acknowledging the atrocities of the American slave trade, and the impact that period in history still has on AA in this country.
    No one in this thread has stated or even indicated that American slavery wasn't a bad thing, but to sit here and conclude that it was the worst form of slavery ever without even considering the slavery that still exist is, well, intolerant and ignorant.

    One could feasibly argue that statements such as "American slavery was a cake walk compared..." "Most slaves were treated as family members..." derives from the fear or cowardice of facing the awful truth of the situation. And it's ongoing legacy...
    If slavery lasted in America for 246 years (if you count 1619 to 1865), how does that compare to nations where it is still ongoing?

    I don't live in SC. I don't know how all African Americans in SC feel about the flag. I do know that some have voiced a very vocal opposition to it.
    And I personally know of some who live in SC that is not bothered by the Confederate flag.

    Guessing as to what some feel or don't feel without any evidence to support it is an exercise in futility.

    To me at least.
    What's an exercise in futility is taking an incident and tying it to an inanimate national symbol as if that same inanimate symbol told the disturbed killer to enter that Church and slaughter 9 people. Another symbol has been the target of nefarious people in the same manner as the symbol of authority (police). Known criminals are portrayed as Saints whereas police are portrayed as known criminals. Marriage is now portrayed as a mere contract that anyone consenting adult can enter and leave at will regardless of gender preference. The Bible and the Constitution are now portrayed as 'outdated', 'old-fashioned', 'oppressive', 'hate-filled', and unimportant. See the pattern?
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 07-06-2015 at 07:21 AM.
    07-05-2015 03:45 PM
  19. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    The slaves stayed where they were because they had no choice. They weren't seen as equals in this society. My mother's side of the family is from the south, while my father and his family is from the west indies. 2 parents, 2 different languages, yet the stories from both are very similar (as far as how blacks and slaves were treated). I don't want to hijack this thread and make it about slavery, however to say that slavery wasn't that bad in America is laughable at best.
    Keep in mind that when you're born into a situation, it's usually all you know, and thus, it's just normal life. People who were born free and then sold into slavery, now that's a different story because they have something to compare it to and the situation would indeed be far more horrible. Is that a fair statement to make?
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 07-06-2015 at 07:24 AM.
    07-05-2015 03:50 PM
  20. mmcfly23's Avatar
    Keep in mind that when you're born into a situation, it's usually all you know, and thus, it's just normal life. People who were born free and then sold into slavery, now that's a difference story because they have something to compare it to and the situation would indeed be far more horrible. Is that a fair statement to make?
    That's fair, however that doesn't negate my argument on slavery "not being that bad in America". Especially considering there's plenty of evidence stating otherwise (heck HBO had a documentary years ago on former slaves that were interviewed post slavery that talked about how horrible things were). Post slavery blacks were still getting lynched, raped, businesses destroyed, harassed, for no reason other than being black. I really wish our education system would shine more light on atrocities committed on this land.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    07-05-2015 04:08 PM
  21. Bigeric23's Avatar
    While the Confederate flag does not bother me, I try to think like this:

    "I know and am persuaded in the Lord Jesus that nothing is unclean in itself, but it is unclean for anyone who thinks it unclean. For if your brother is grieved by what you eat, you are no longer walking in love. By what you eat, do not destroy the one for whom Christ died" (Romans 14:14-15).
    Just_Me_D and SmartFah like this.
    07-05-2015 04:11 PM
  22. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    That's fair, however that doesn't negate my argument on slavery "not being that bad in America". Especially considering there's plenty of evidence stating otherwise (heck HBO had a documentary years ago on former slaves that were interviewed post slavery that talked about how horrible things were). Post slavery blacks were still getting lynched, raped, businesses destroyed, harassed, for no reason other than being black. I really wish our education system would shine more light on atrocities committed on this land.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    What you stated is true, but I did not state that slavery wasn't that bad in America. I stated that it was foolish to conclude that it was the worst kind of slavery ever, especially compared to the slavery that's still going on elsewhere. I'm not downplaying American slavery, but I am trying to put it in its proper perspective among worldwide slavery. I hope that made sense...
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 07-06-2015 at 07:26 AM.
    mmcfly23 likes this.
    07-05-2015 04:15 PM
  23. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    While the Confederate flag does not bother me, I try to think like this:

    "I know and am persuaded in the Lord Jesus that nothing is unclean in itself, but it is unclean for anyone who thinks it unclean. For if your brother is grieved by what you eat, you are no longer walking in love. By what you eat, do not destroy the one for whom Christ died" (Romans 14:14-15).
    Well-stated, sir. Unfortunately, not everyone believes...
    07-05-2015 04:17 PM
  24. Soeasy's Avatar

    1.) That statement/opinion does not prove that he hated Asians. Come on, man. You know this!

    2.) I understand, but even the example you use here is not an example of hatred. It's like you're being in the advertising business and you have to choose between a good looking white person with perfect teeth and a good looking black person with crooked teeth to be featured smiling on a billboard. Are you being racist for not picked the black person or is it a smart business decision?

    3.) No one in this thread has stated or even indicated that American slavery wasn't a bad thing, but to sit here and conclude that it was the worst form of slavery ever without even considering the slavery that still exist is, well, intolerant and ignorant.

    4.) If slavery lasted in America for 246 years (if you count 1619 to 1865), how does that compare to nations where it is still ongoing?

    5.) And I personally know of some who live in SC that is not bothered by the Confederate flag.

    6.) Known criminals are portrayed as Saints whereas police are portrayed as known criminals.

    7.) Marriage is now portrayed as a mere contract that anyone consenting adult can enter and leave at will regardless of gender preference.

    8.) The Bible and the Constitution are now portrayed as 'outdated', 'old-fashioned', 'oppressive', 'hate-filled', and unimportant. See the pattern?
    1.) No, I'm sorry, I really don't.

    2.) This is flawed. He didn't say my partner shouldn't come because he had crooked teeth. He said my partner being Jewish might be offensive to the client. My partner has perfect teeth. He uses the same Iranian Dentist that I use. And truth be told. If he walked past you on Park Ave you wouldn't be able to distinguish him from any other white guy walking down the Ave. So why would the Merril Lynch guy "assume" that the client in Kentucky would be offended by a Jew at the meeting? Stop pretending man.

    This is America. We have an obligation to stand up and say if you discriminate for it's own sake, we as American will not tolerate this and you will not prosper here.

    3 & 4.) Who in this thread has actually stated that American Slavery was the worst ever. Please, show me that post. And what does one thing have to do with another anyway. Why does if have to be the 'worst' as you put for some to say that it was wrong.

    Why does it have to be a matter of extremely this or that?

    5.) And they are abosolutley correct. My argument is about it's hanging at the State Capital funded by tax payers.

    6.) Let's live in Reality. Some cops ARE criminals and should never have been given a badge. I'm a big supporter of the NYPD, but bad cops should be found and removed because historically they'll always do more harm than good.

    7.) What do I care who chooses to get married? The history of the marriage license was never about religious purpose. It was about property rights and inheritance. Read up on this. This is factually true.

    In fact, for many years after the founding of this country, Common-law marriage was the law of the land. No one needed a license to get married.

    The purpose of the "marriage license" movement and blood tests(which is now illegal) was largely to prevent blacks from marrying whites. I wonder if you actually knew this or not.

    8.) What does the Bible have to do with anything? And whose bible anyway? My Jewish partner has his own "bible". My Iranian dentist proably also has his own. Both are good men. So, what does that bible have to do with anything?
    Last edited by Soeasy; 07-05-2015 at 06:25 PM. Reason: Typos.
    07-05-2015 05:07 PM
  25. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    I mean no disrespect to you Sean. I like and enjoy reading your posts. But, this actually a terrible analogy to make.
    It was a perfectly rational analogy...I never said mexicans were slaves, I said they were being done an injustice by being compensated so poorly for their service...and if we decided that this is something to be scoffed at as a truly evil doing and ban it from happening...do we look at this decision in 50 years as something that our current flags "reflect" like people are trying to inflect on the confederate battle flag?

    I never compared the two injustices...I simply used it as a hypothetical scenario. A negatively viewed event that is happening in the shadow of our current flags.

    Your primary issue seems to be in light of this flag being flown at a facility that is funded by "tax payers"...and this is interesting to me, mainly because I fail to see the point you're trying to make by defining this. The confederate battle flag is NOT flown at state buildings...a variant that pays homage to the flag by a specific design while also remaining relevant to whichever state it is being flown in in that instance...it's flown in this nature because of relevance to the original confederate states and the echoes those states made to the country we live in now (good and bad).

    So what difference does it make that tax payers fund these buildings? Do you realize that when you make such a statement, you reflect ALL tax payers...including those historically invested in said flag? Have you read about this man? I'm sure he'd have something to say about your complaint that tax payers shouldn't have to see this flag at state buildings.

    http://www.bizpacreview.com/2015/06/...is-flag-218009
    Last edited by SeanHRCC; 07-05-2015 at 10:24 PM.
    07-05-2015 10:11 PM
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