1. pappy53's Avatar
    I have been a Windows user since 1995. I now need a new desktop, and am thinking about trying a Mac. Couple of questions:

    1- What is the main differences between Windows and Mac? I am not trying to start a war here, but I really don't know the difference. I am in a comfort zone with Windows, and it makes me nervous to think about switching.

    2- Most of my time on computers is spent web-surfing, e-mails, and digital photography. I like the looks and the price of the iMac, as opposed to the Mac Pro. Will the iMac suffice me as to what my normal computer activities are?

    Thanks for any input.
    06-24-2011 05:10 AM
  2. Fausty82's Avatar
    I have been a Windows user since 1995. I now need a new desktop, and am thinking about trying a Mac. Couple of questions:

    1- What is the main differences between Windows and Mac? I am not trying to start a war here, but I really don't know the difference. I am in a comfort zone with Windows, and it makes me nervous to think about switching.

    2- Most of my time on computers is spent web-surfing, e-mails, and digital photography. I like the looks and the price of the iMac, as opposed to the Mac Pro. Will the iMac suffice me as to what my normal computer activities are?

    Thanks for any input.
    For what you are interested in doing (web surfing, emails and photography), you will be fine with the iMac. The Mac Pro is a high-end machine for heavy duty use - video rendering, and other high processing power demands. As the name suggests, it's a professional level machine - and it's spec'ed and priced accordingly.

    As far as the differences between Windows and Mac (OSX), it's really about the approach and the experience.

    The one major advantage that the Mac platform has over the PC/Windows platform is continuity.

    "Windows machines" (PCs) can be built by any one... with differing levels of quality parts. Some use high quality parts; some use junk parts. Regardless of the quality of the parts that go into the machine, Microsoft has to write code/provide drivers (most drivers are written by the hardware manufacturer). This results in a patchwork approach in some respects. But this also means that Microsoft has to support all comers, sometimes with poor results... the old adage "garbage in, garbage out" applies. (I am not calling the PC platform garbage)... but you get what you get. And Windows has to support them all.

    On the Mac side, both the hardware and the OS is developed by a single company (Apple) with a single set of standards for quality. Apple can get away with writing tighter, less inclusive code, because there is typically one set of hardware to write for. The instance of things like the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) is almost non-existant because those issues are usually the result of driver issues... and since Apple only has one set of hardware to write code for, they only have to deal with one set of drivers.

    It's also been said that Mac hardware is more expensive than the PC platform. But if you build a PC (Windows machine) using the same level of high-quality parts as Apple uses, both the quality and price of the two platforms are remarkably equal.
    06-24-2011 10:30 AM
  3. korp#IM's Avatar
    I just was in this situation after my PC gave out. Price wise the Pro is more expensive no doubt about that and has other options like additional onboard hard drives and many cores in your processor so the money isn't wasted. However, if you don't do something that demands all that why go with it? The iMac is sufficient for a lot of people, especially if you are using it for more personal/hobby use. Also, as more of your first Mac it is a pretty good place to start. I bought the 27inch and it looks amazing. Remember too, on Mac's you don't necessarily need the best of this or that because any part in the computer has quality parts that will work correctly with the software version or it will not get the update.
    06-25-2011 05:18 PM
  4. pyroguysf's Avatar
    Especially since they were just updated, even the lowest end iMac should more than suit your needs. Apple at least tries to do a good job of getting new users the proper information and guides to switch from a PC to their first Mac. One place to start is their own "Switch 101" guide for PC users switching to OS X (Apple - Support - Switch 101). There are also tons of other guide from reputable websites you can find on Google- in general, Mac users have a stronger community helping people switch over.

    Also, go into an Apple retail store and the employees are often very helpful. They work retail so, yeah they're still going to want to try to sell you their product, but they're normally pretty good about answering questions and actually being helpful, not forceful or deceitful.

    Macs and OS X well, "just work" as Steve Jobs might put it, and most people will say Macs are more user friendly than PCs, and the learning curve isn't too steep. The most confusing parts about switching are things like getting used to the menu bar up top, dock on the bottom, closing a window doesn't actually close the program, getting used to the Command button opposed to Control (e.g. command+c opposed to ctrl+c to copy), command+tab switching between apps instead of windows, and that maximize doesn't actually fill the whole screen (most of the time). Lifehacker had a good article about "How to Get Windows Best Features on Mac OS X."
    06-25-2011 09:27 PM
  5. genuinegraphics's Avatar
    I just recently switched from Windows to iMac and to be honest I can't say I made the wrong decision. It is much more user friendly and didn't take long to get used to.

    proguysf mentioned the main things that you might not catch on as quick but I got used to it within a few hours and for jobs like photography and creating graphics then it's brilliant because it has amazing graphics and plenty of storage and the spec is amazing which just keeps the Mac running smoothly no matter how many programs you have running.

    I installed Windows too as a partition on my hard drive because sometimes I need it for Uni assignments and stuff and that has helped me too because I have Windows installed onto the same computer which means that I don't have to switch to another laptop/PC and on top you only have one wire! Just one wire to connect to the iMac and your plug socket and that's it you're good to go. That's what amazed me when I first got it out the box I was looking for other wires thinking "this can't be it" but I would say if you do switch then it's a good decision and investment and definitely worth the money.
    06-25-2011 10:17 PM
  6. Fausty82's Avatar
    The best thing I did, in terms of learning my way around OSX was to pull all of my files off onto an external drive AND DISCONNECT the Windows machine. I forced myself to figure it out using the Mac and OSX... and within a day or two I was very comfortable. Yeah, there are guides to help along the way, but my advice above all else is to lose the crutch as soon as you can... I am now "hooked for life".
    06-26-2011 12:07 AM
  7. Ipheuria's Avatar
    If you have alot of software in Windows then you should stick to Windows. Also keep in mind that unlike Windows where you can simply hop on the web search for a program to do X and download free applications and get it done on Apple there just may not be applications. Until this year for instance there was no AutoCAD software for Mac.

    On the other hand newer Macs can now run Windows either through Boot Camp or in Parrallel virtually. So you could always install Windows and load whatever software you are used to or own. Some software vendors, not alot and it's hit and miss but for instance Adobe will give you the Mac version of their software if you own the Windows version you just have to promise to destroy the other version. The Mac is also more intuitive when it comes to things like connecting a digital camera, DV cam, etc it just works unlike Windows where you might have to buy an add on device, etc. The OS itself is a bit different but not drastically so as a Windows user it will take you about a week to figure things out.
    07-01-2011 02:50 AM
  8. Fausty82's Avatar
    The Mac is also more intuitive when it comes to things like connecting a digital camera, DV cam, etc it just works unlike Windows where you might have to buy an add on device, etc. The OS itself is a bit different but not drastically so as a Windows user it will take you about a week to figure things out.
    When I switched, I kept wanting to go back to my PC to do this task or that one... I finally pulled all my data off on an external drive, and put the PC away. Stuck it in the back of the closet. If I needed something, I went to the external drive backup... it only took a couple of days for everything OSX to start "clicking" in my brain. My opinion: it's not that hard to figure it out when you have no other option.
    07-01-2011 11:41 AM
  9. SurfinUSA's Avatar
    Go for the iMac (I think they may be discontinuing the Mac Pros?)

    Switching to MAC! I was in this situation 3 years ago. I had never used a Mac, but had used PCs for 14 years prior. I decided to get a MBP for video editing, and after about 6 months realized that I would never purchase another PC.

    1) It really just works!
    2) Apple's Customer service has been awesome to me.
    3) The interface and physical design are 'cleaner'
    08-09-2011 10:03 PM
  10. crazyflyinshark's Avatar
    Go into your local Mac Store they tell you the differences and convince you to switch. You can also run windows on mac!
    09-10-2011 09:54 PM
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