1. eric6052's Avatar
    What possible uses do you see for the iPad Mini in education? If the price point is low enough could we see schools purchasing these instead of textbooks for students? As I see it we have pros and cons for the use of the Mini in schools:
    Pros in education
    1. Cost could actually be lower than the cost of buying books. Debatable
    2. The content can varied with different books and apps for different grades skill levels.
    3. Properly locked down the students could receive homework assignments and handouts on the iPad without the need to print them.
    4. Tests could be taken and submitted on the iPad as well as sending in homework all without wasting paper.
    5. The possibilities for interactive learning are endless by incorporating video, pictures and sound to lessons.
    6. Special education students are already making use of the iPad with special apps created for kids with Autism. Wider availability will increase this usage.
    7. Things like art, music and photography classes could all make use of the iPad to enhance the classroom experience.

    Cons of the iPad in education.
    1. Durability. The iPad has a glass screen and kids arent known for being the most careful of people especially with stuff that doesn't belong to the,.
    2. Doing things like math homework/tests could be rather difficult when you're required to show your work. A stylus may help but it's not perfect.
    3. Initial cost could be rather high. Schools buy books on a rolling basis not all new books every year so buying the initial run of hardware, apps and texts could be fairly high.

    What do you all think?
    08-29-2012 05:41 PM
  2. bjmcdonald's Avatar
    Here's the problem: 48 states have signed on to participate in CCSS (Common Core State Standards), a set of standards that will have a high stakes test that will be completed online. Sounds great, right. Wrong...the guidelines state that devices used on the test must be at least 9". Bummer!
    08-30-2012 12:58 AM
  3. eric6052's Avatar
    That's a shame because it seemed like a natural fit for the price point and a smaller tablet would actually be easier for kids to use. I guess the iPad 2 may end up being the default education tablet.
    09-02-2012 06:38 PM
  4. loco90's Avatar
    Here's the problem: 48 states have signed on to participate in CCSS (Common Core State Standards), a set of standards that will have a high stakes test that will be completed online. Sounds great, right. Wrong...the guidelines state that devices used on the test must be at least 9". Bummer!
    I don't remember seeing guidelines in regards to tablet size. Where is this info located? I would like to see how the mini would work in the classroom. I really like the size. Plus the cost doesn't hurt as much when one is broken (if truly priced around 200-250).
    09-07-2012 10:32 PM
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