1. Wiltron's Avatar
    Let's say iOS 5 is out, and I decide to subscribe to the $25/year iTunes Match program. If I download an album from a website, and add it to my iTunes library, will it upgrade that album DRM free to 256kbps as stated? Or is it safe to assume that like "find track names" it has to imported via CD to the iTunes library?

    Thanks!

    PS: Mods, not trying to get illegal music, or ask where to acquire it, I know the rules, and I know where to get music online, just asking about the feature.
    06-07-2011 08:38 AM
  2. Ipheuria's Avatar
    As far as they said at WWDC it should make the 256 version available DRM free. This is why you pay the cashola, I'm guessing this will only be for the songs that are available in iTunes so if you have some obscure or really new song then don't know what will happen then.
    06-07-2011 11:43 AM
  3. jsntrenkler's Avatar
    I agree with Ipheuria, and for me it will be a great deal considering the fact that I still have about 1100 DRM tracks from the golden days of iTunes on my computer. I didn't want to spend the $245 when they offered to remove the DRM back during the + transition.
    06-07-2011 11:51 AM
  4. Wiltron's Avatar
    I guess I didn't explain clearly, in an attempt to not come off as breaking the rules of the forum about asking about piracy.

    If I pirate an album from a website, and load it into iTunes now, it syncs fine and plays fine and everything. With this new feature, will it "upgrade" this album I've downloaded making it better quality and DRM free?

    Assuming that is the case, isn't this a huge step backwards? Seems like Napster all over again only with free upgrades sponsored by Apple.. One person buys the album and rips it, and Apple takes it and upgrades it for you, DRM free so you can then distribute.
    06-07-2011 12:24 PM
  5. Disturbed_Angel's Avatar
    @ Wiltron, that was my thinking as well. I buy all my music, mostly from amazon rather than Apple, but many don't, and I see this as a rather cheap and effective way to get high quality versions of music, with out regard to source.
    06-07-2011 12:39 PM
  6. Ipheuria's Avatar
    Which is why I said as far as I heard no matter where you got the song as long as it's in the iTunes catalogue then it will give you their 256 version DRM free. The money you pay for the service will offset wherever you got the song whether you ripped it from your CDs or whatever. If it's not in the catalogue then you wont get anything. If you have the song in iTunes and you have iTunes OTA sync then possibly it will go to the cloud and out to your other devices. If Apple didn't get the rights to the music aka it's not in their catalogue then they don't have that song.
    06-07-2011 12:45 PM
  7. AStranger's Avatar
    Which is why I said as far as I heard no matter where you got the song as long as it's in the iTunes catalogue then it will give you their 256 version DRM free. The money you pay for the service will offset wherever you got the song whether you ripped it from your CDs or whatever. If it's not in the catalogue then you wont get anything. If you have the song in iTunes and you have iTunes OTA sync then possibly it will go to the cloud and out to your other devices. If Apple didn't get the rights to the music aka it's not in their catalogue then they don't have that song.
    That's my take on it. If it's not in their catalog then they just upload the file you have on your system and use that - no matter what the quality.

    This might be a nice feature to pay for one year just to upgrade the quality of your existing music...assuming you get to keep the upgraded file after your subscription ends
    06-07-2011 12:52 PM
  8. Disturbed_Angel's Avatar
    Exactly, you know that they took that kind of abuse into account when the whole thing was agreed on by Apple and the labels.
    06-07-2011 12:58 PM
  9. Wiltron's Avatar
    For self defense clarification: I also buy 95% of my music. I think I have one or two albums which were "acquired" by other sources, only because of it not being available on the store.

    If the case that many are assuming that the $25 / year covers the cost of illegitimate downloaders getting upgraded music for free, I think it should be more. When an album is averaging $10 each, and most users have at least 30 albums on their iDevice (pulled that number out of my ***, it's probably more), it's a substantial loss. I think Apple is giving its users too much credit in thinking way more users buy rather than download.
    06-08-2011 09:02 AM
  10. cjvitek's Avatar
    That's my take on it. If it's not in their catalog then they just upload the file you have on your system and use that - no matter what the quality.

    This might be a nice feature to pay for one year just to upgrade the quality of your existing music...assuming you get to keep the upgraded file after your subscription ends
    That's what I am curious about. 95% of my music is ripped from my CD's. If I pay one year, get those upgraded and streaming on the cloud via MusicMatch (or whatever it is called), and then stop after one year, do I lose the streaming ability for those songs?

    Chris
    06-08-2011 10:15 AM
  11. jsntrenkler's Avatar
    Hmmm, I would suspect that it would work in the way you describe. I would guess that the music publishers get a taste of that $25 a month. So in the end I suppose they may be getting some time of payment for the music that is downloaded legally or illegally.
    06-08-2011 11:02 AM
  12. cjvitek's Avatar
    If that is the case, then basically this amounts to the people who have legally ripped music from CD's are subsidizing the people who are illegally downloading music.

    It's too bad there can be some sort of "scan CD" option so you can put a legal CD into the computer, and iTunes will do the MusicMatch once and for all.
    06-08-2011 11:15 AM
  13. shinbone's Avatar
    My biggest concern for iTunes Match:

    I have a huge music library (over 100 gigs) and I have made "tag changes" to lots of my music files/info to unify how everything appears on my iTunes and ios devices (iphone, ipods). I've made tag changes to "artists, albums, album art" etc. . . and they are all organized just the way I like em.

    I'm not too sure/confident that once my music library is "copied" onto iCloud via iTunes Match, if my tag changes on my music files will remain the way I have them or if it will "change" to the "default" values set by Apple. If the latter is true, this will be a deal breaker for me.

    For now, I don't think anyone knows how this will play out (maybe other than Apple). I guess we'll just wait and see . .
    06-08-2011 12:00 PM
  14. spades1412's Avatar
    The way I understand iTunes match to work is that it will scan your existing itunes library and make the entire library available to you to download on all your idevices. If there is a song that apple is missing in their catalog of music, you will have the option to upload that song so that it is also available to download to your other device via icloud.

    There will be no streaming option with iCloud. At least not that Apple has mentioned. It will simply be a list of all your songs available to download wherever. Apple has paid the labels and acquired the proper licensees to do this. Them doing this combats the piracy aspect of it. It will not matter how you acquired the music.

    Heres a good article that explains how iTunes Match will work.
    Apple Announces iCloud Music Service : The Record : NPR
    06-08-2011 02:16 PM
  15. AStranger's Avatar
    That's what I am curious about. 95% of my music is ripped from my CD's. If I pay one year, get those upgraded and streaming on the cloud via MusicMatch (or whatever it is called), and then stop after one year, do I lose the streaming ability for those songs?

    Chris
    I would at least hope that I could keep the upgraded version of the file.

    I think you will keep the streaming, but you will be limited to the 5GB of space for files that you didn't buy with iTunes.
    06-08-2011 02:53 PM
  16. Disturbed_Angel's Avatar
    I believe that if you want to maintain the iCloud access you have to keep paying the $25. If you just want a one time upgrade to the 256 AAC, you could pay it once and be done, then use the 5GB storage for down load, but then I am not sure what the iTunes access would be, as I am sure the files would only be listed under music as long as you are paying the $25 a year, but that is purely guess based off the information I have seen. For me, this new program is the push to switch to all AAC and iTunes for music, not to mention a way to get upgraded versions of music I got years ago at poor quality before I knew better. I have been waiting as I did not want to have mixed sources, and have been all MP3 till now.
    06-08-2011 03:53 PM
  17. rgar3388's Avatar
    I believe that if you want to maintain the iCloud access you have to keep paying the $25. If you just want a one time upgrade to the 256 AAC, you could pay it once and be done, then use the 5GB storage for down load, but then I am not sure what the iTunes access would be, as I am sure the files would only be listed under music as long as you are paying the $25 a year, but that is purely guess based off the information I have seen. For me, this new program is the push to switch to all AAC and iTunes for music, not to mention a way to get upgraded versions of music I got years ago at poor quality before I knew better. I have been waiting as I did not want to have mixed sources, and have been all MP3 till now.
    FYI iTunes can upgrade all of your music to 256 AAC quality on its own. Easy way to do it would be to make smart playlist with rules bit rate less than 256. Make sure you have the burn cd to 256 aac quality under preferences. Then highlight all, right click and select convert to 256 AAC. then after they're converted highlight all of the songs in the smart playlist, change the album name to "qwer" or whatever you want it doesn't matter. Search that in your library and delete all of those old lower quality songs. And bwala, you have it. It's a lot easier than it sounds. Also, iTunes match and music storage do not count towards the 5GB's of storage. Mail, Contacts, Calendars, Backups, and settings are the only things that count.
    Last edited by rgar3388; 06-08-2011 at 04:34 PM.
    Disturbed_Angel likes this.
    06-08-2011 04:31 PM
  18. Disturbed_Angel's Avatar
    FYI iTunes can upgrade all of your music to 256 AAC quality on its own. Easy way to do it would be to make smart playlist with rules bit rate less than 256. Make sure you have the burn cd to 256 aac quality under preferences. Then highlight all, right click and select convert to 256 AAC. then after they're converted highlight all of the songs in the smart playlist, change the album name to "qwer" or whatever you want it doesn't matter. Search that in your library and delete all of those old lower quality songs. And bwala, you have it. It's a lot easier than it sounds. Also, iTunes match and music storage do not count towards the 5GB's of storage. Mail, Contacts, Calendars, Backups, and settings are the only things that count.
    First, thank you for the AAC convert walk though, will be using that once I am in front of my full computer again, not my travel laptop. Secondly, I think you may have miss read what I was saying. Yes, the matched music will not count while you pay, but I highly doubt that you will be able to pay for one year, match all of your music, download it, and then stop paying and still have access to it as purchased items in iTunes for download. Yes, you would have the music, but I doubt that you would continue to have access to it on iTunes in iCloud. If that is the case, then at that point if you want to have the music on iCloud, it would be uploaded as files to the 5GB block, and would count at that point.
    06-08-2011 04:57 PM
  19. rgar3388's Avatar
    First, thank you for the AAC convert walk though, will be using that once I am in front of my full computer again, not my travel laptop. Secondly, I think you may have miss read what I was saying. Yes, the matched music will not count while you pay, but I highly doubt that you will be able to pay for one year, match all of your music, download it, and then stop paying and still have access to it as purchased items in iTunes for download. Yes, you would have the music, but I doubt that you would continue to have access to it on iTunes in iCloud. If that is the case, then at that point if you want to have the music on iCloud, it would be uploaded as files to the 5GB block, and would count at that point.
    Gotcha! Okay I get what you said now. That sounds about right.
    06-08-2011 05:16 PM
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