1. BoB16731's Avatar
    i had the Iphone 4s gave it up the screen was just too small ... went to android and didnt think i would ever see a larger screen iphone ... Ys they releasd the 5 5s and 5c . ... still didnt excite me enough to make the jump back . now that the iphone 6 6+ im really considering jumping back .. after reading about the bending bad software update ... im worried about pulling the trigger ...

    im asking whats the benefits i would gain jumping to IOS ecosystem
    09-25-2014 01:47 PM
  2. kch50428's Avatar
    Bending will only be an issue for those who don't accept personal responsibility for the care of their devices....take care of it, and it won't bend.
    RollTideFanGrl likes this.
    09-25-2014 01:50 PM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    The benefits are the same as they were when you were using the iPhone 4S. As for fear of the newer device bending, some have fears about it whereas others do not. You will have to weigh the pros and cons of it and take into consideration its aluminum build and decide if you should return to using an updated iOS device or not.
    09-25-2014 01:51 PM
  4. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    Talk of iPhones bending have gone on for years. Most any phone will bend or break if you abuse it by putting it in your back pocket and sitting on it. This whole issue is blown out of proportion.


    Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5
    kch50428 and Anthonyiamador like this.
    09-25-2014 01:55 PM
  5. Flow39's Avatar
    iOS offers a solid, fluid, coherent user interface that performs exceptionally. Don't let the bending reports scare you away, as long as you take care of it, you shouldn't have a problem.
    09-25-2014 09:55 PM
  6. Travisimo's Avatar
    As a frequent switcher between iOS and Android, I feel I can chime in somewhat objectively. There's obviously something alluring about the iPhone that is prompting you to consider switching back. You have to seriously ask yourself what that is. Is it the hardware? Is it the ecosystem? Is it iOS?

    Regarding "bentgate", it's nothing to worry about under normal day to day operation. Can it bend? Sure. According to Consumer Reports, it takes less force to bend (and break) the HTC One M8 than it does the iPhone 6 Plus. And yet, there was never an alarmist conspiracy raised against the M8. There are three reasons why this "bentgate" issue became a mainstream headliner: 1) because Apple sold over 10 million phones in one weekend, so there's bound to be something that pops up as an issue (always happens, always will), 2) because these kind of headlines are massive click-bait for the blogs and news organizations, and 3) because people love to hate on Apple because they are so successful. Only time will tell if the new phones are truly susceptible to bending under normal use, but all indications are pointing to it not being an issue for the vast majority of owners.

    Regarding the ecosystems, there's not nearly as much of a divide between iOS and Android as there used to be. There are still apps on iOS that aren't on Android. And it's still true that many apps on iOS are designed better than there Android counterparts. But Android has come a long way (as you are probably well aware) and things like Google Now make Android distinct from iOS (even though it's on iOS, it's not integrated like on Android). Then again, almost all of Google's services are available on iOS and some of them are actually better on iPhone. It's really an easy switch between either platform. But if you mainly want to jump in and out of APPS, then iOS is superior. If you want total customization and want to spend more time customizing your home screens and launcher, then Android is the only choice.

    Regarding hardware, well there's a TON of choices on Android, and some very good ones as well. But there's nothing quite like an iPhone, despite repeated attempts at copying. Apple still has design chops, that's for sure. I've used most of the latest Android flagships, and there's really nothing, in my opinion, that matches the iPhone in hardware design. The HTC One M8 is probably the closest, but it has some shortcomings that I found objectionable (mainly the camera and very slippery body.

    I'll just say what factors brought me back to iOS after spending the last 6-9 months on Android using the Nexus 5, HTC One M8, OnePlus One:

    1) Camera. I take a lot of photos and videos on my phone. Nothing matches the overall quality of the iPhone camera. There are some phone cameras that are superior in certain areas (higher resolution, for example), but the iPhone camera is balanced, consistent, and excellent in every way. The upgrades to the iPhone 6 camera are substantial, despite staying at 8mp. Better low light capability, better signal processing, better slow motion, better focusing, OIS... the list goes on.

    2) Touch ID. Unlocking an Android phone is just plain inconvenient. Samsung's fingerprint scanner sucks. Bluetooth Trusted Devices helps a bit by keeping your phone unlocked when you are near a paired device, but it has shortcomings. Pattern unlock and face unlock aren't secure. There's really nothing as good as Touch ID on Android. Period. When Touch ID first came out a year ago, it was good but not completely reliable. Then they updated iOS and improved it a great deal. The iPhone 6 Touch ID, however, has been 100% reliable for me so far. Honestly, I have not had one Touch ID failure since using the device over a week ago. Furthermore, opening up Touch ID to apps like 1Password (and many others) is a HUGE win for Apple. Yes, Touch ID can be hacked with great time and effort, but passwords and pin numbers can be brute forced and hacked as well. Nothing is 100% secure, but I trust Touch ID and soon we'll get to use it for mobile payments. Yes, Android has had NFC payments for quite some time, but they don't have Touch ID for authentication, which I think is a big advantage for Apple.

    3) The "walled garden" + continuity. Call it a blessing, call it a curse. But one thing is for certain: Apple's walled garden has created one of the best user experiences available. It's a joy to communicate between other iOS users with iMessage. It's terrific that we can now have continuity between our iPhone, iPad, Mac, etc. The amount of integration between Apple devices and other Apple users makes iOS a platform that works very well when you are in the ecosystem. Some don't like the closed approach, and that's okay. It has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes I feel confined and end up going back to Android for a while to breath. But I always seem to come back to iOS for all of the aforementioned reasons.

    All in all, it's a very personal choice and there does not have to be a "winner". It's easy to make a case for either platform, and it basically comes down to your love of hardware and software. We finally have more choice in the Apple world! What will you do?
    09-27-2014 08:08 AM
  7. jimpilot's Avatar
    As a frequent switcher between iOS and Android, I feel I can chime in somewhat objectively. There's obviously something alluring about the iPhone that is prompting you to consider switching back. You have to seriously ask yourself what that is. Is it the hardware? Is it the ecosystem? Is it iOS?

    Regarding "bentgate", it's nothing to worry about under normal day to day operation. Can it bend? Sure. According to Consumer Reports, it takes less force to bend (and break) the HTC One M8 than it does the iPhone 6 Plus. And yet, there was never an alarmist conspiracy raised against the M8. There are three reasons why this "bentgate" issue became a mainstream headliner: 1) because Apple sold over 10 million phones in one weekend, so there's bound to be something that pops up as an issue (always happens, always will), 2) because these kind of headlines are massive click-bait for the blogs and news organizations, and 3) because people love to hate on Apple because they are so successful. Only time will tell if the new phones are truly susceptible to bending under normal use, but all indications are pointing to it not being an issue for the vast majority of owners.

    Regarding the ecosystems, there's not nearly as much of a divide between iOS and Android as there used to be. There are still apps on iOS that aren't on Android. And it's still true that many apps on iOS are designed better than there Android counterparts. But Android has come a long way (as you are probably well aware) and things like Google Now make Android distinct from iOS (even though it's on iOS, it's not integrated like on Android). Then again, almost all of Google's services are available on iOS and some of them are actually better on iPhone. It's really an easy switch between either platform. But if you mainly want to jump in and out of APPS, then iOS is superior. If you want total customization and want to spend more time customizing your home screens and launcher, then Android is the only choice.

    Regarding hardware, well there's a TON of choices on Android, and some very good ones as well. But there's nothing quite like an iPhone, despite repeated attempts at copying. Apple still has design chops, that's for sure. I've used most of the latest Android flagships, and there's really nothing, in my opinion, that matches the iPhone in hardware design. The HTC One M8 is probably the closest, but it has some shortcomings that I found objectionable (mainly the camera and very slippery body.

    I'll just say what factors brought me back to iOS after spending the last 6-9 months on Android using the Nexus 5, HTC One M8, OnePlus One:

    1) Camera. I take a lot of photos and videos on my phone. Nothing matches the overall quality of the iPhone camera. There are some phone cameras that are superior in certain areas (higher resolution, for example), but the iPhone camera is balanced, consistent, and excellent in every way. The upgrades to the iPhone 6 camera are substantial, despite staying at 8mp. Better low light capability, better signal processing, better slow motion, better focusing, OIS... the list goes on.

    2) Touch ID. Unlocking an Android phone is just plain inconvenient. Samsung's fingerprint scanner sucks. Bluetooth Trusted Devices helps a bit by keeping your phone unlocked when you are near a paired device, but it has shortcomings. Pattern unlock and face unlock aren't secure. There's really nothing as good as Touch ID on Android. Period. When Touch ID first came out a year ago, it was good but not completely reliable. Then they updated iOS and improved it a great deal. The iPhone 6 Touch ID, however, has been 100% reliable for me so far. Honestly, I have not had one Touch ID failure since using the device over a week ago. Furthermore, opening up Touch ID to apps like 1Password (and many others) is a HUGE win for Apple. Yes, Touch ID can be hacked with great time and effort, but passwords and pin numbers can be brute forced and hacked as well. Nothing is 100% secure, but I trust Touch ID and soon we'll get to use it for mobile payments. Yes, Android has had NFC payments for quite some time, but they don't have Touch ID for authentication, which I think is a big advantage for Apple.

    3) The "walled garden" + continuity. Call it a blessing, call it a curse. But one thing is for certain: Apple's walled garden has created one of the best user experiences available. It's a joy to communicate between other iOS users with iMessage. It's terrific that we can now have continuity between our iPhone, iPad, Mac, etc. The amount of integration between Apple devices and other Apple users makes iOS a platform that works very well when you are in the ecosystem. Some don't like the closed approach, and that's okay. It has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes I feel confined and end up going back to Android for a while to breath. But I always seem to come back to iOS for all of the aforementioned reasons.

    All in all, it's a very personal choice and there does not have to be a "winner". It's easy to make a case for either platform, and it basically comes down to your love of hardware and software. We finally have more choice in the Apple world! What will you do?
    Well written and thoughtful response that also helped me decide. Thank you for taking the time!
    09-27-2014 08:17 AM
  8. noristation's Avatar
    For me it was a good switch back with IOS 8. My entire household was fully on IOS but me. The IOS 8 family sharing is great. After I set it up on all devices it has made my life easy. Bonus is not loosing screen real estate moving from a galaxy note to a iPhone 6 Plus.

    4 iPads, 2 iPhones, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, iMac.

    Other than family share, The new iPhone captured what I switched over to android for; simply a bigger screen so I didn't have to feel cramped when typing.
    09-27-2014 09:43 AM

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-29-2014, 11:12 PM
  2. Is it the end of the line for the second-generation Apple TV?
    By iMore.com in forum iMore.com News Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-25-2014, 07:02 PM
  3. The waiting game ..
    By ashley108 in forum iPhone 6 Plus
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-25-2014, 01:57 PM
  4. The 'Shellshock' Bash vulnerability and what it means for OS X
    By iMore.com in forum iMore.com News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-25-2014, 01:51 PM
  5. How to use the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus one-handed with Reachability
    By iMore.com in forum iMore.com News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-25-2014, 12:51 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD