1. Tartarus's Avatar
    Don't do yourself down. I'm sure your experience is very relevant.

    But my point is the same. If you give your credit card details to Apple or Google, they can charge you whatever they claim to owe them whenever they like. This is why it's a bad idea to leave your card details with them.

    It's better to use a bank card directly because then there is no middle man to take a cut and potentially get things wrong. You could argue that in North America the payment card infrastructure is so insecure that using it with a magnetic strip card is even worse than giving your card details to a third party. Actually I would agree with that. But in the rest of the world we have chip-and-PIN and contactless payments, and these are very safe already.
    The payment details provided in Apple Pay by you are not going through to iTunes payment information, they can be totally different an apple doesn’t assume anything.
    If you didn’t provide any payment information in iTunes or App Store you will not be charged on your Apple Pay payment information.

    You oughta know by now that Apple doesn’t do anything without your consent.
    05-03-2018 09:38 AM
  2. doogald's Avatar
    But my point is the same. If you give your credit card details to Apple or Google, they can charge you whatever they claim to owe them whenever they like. This is why it's a bad idea to leave your card details with them.
    Apple Pay is different from giving Apple or Google or Amazon or any retailer your card details. Card details are stored in the Secure Enclave and not at Apple. Apple cannot access the data at all and does not store actual account numbers and cannot even access the unique generated account numberer the card.

    Information here: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT203027

    When you add a credit, debit, prepaid, or transit card (where available) to Apple Pay, information that you enter on your device is encrypted and sent to Apple servers. If you use the camera to enter the card information, the information is never saved on your device or photo library.Apple decrypts the data, determines your card’s payment network, and re-encrypts the data with a key that only your payment network (or any providers authorized by your card issuer for provisioning and token services) can unlock.

    Information that you provide about your card, whether certain device settings are enabled, and device use patterns—such as the percent of time the device is in motion and the approximate number of calls you make per week—may be sent to Apple to determine your eligibility to enable Apple Pay. Information may also be provided by Apple to your card issuer, payment network, or any providers authorized by your card issuer to enable Apple Pay, to determine the eligibility of your card, to set up your card with Apple Pay, and to prevent fraud.

    After your card is approved, your bank, your bank’s authorized service provider, or your card issuer creates a device-specific Device Account Number, encrypts it, and sends it along with other data (such as the key used to generate dynamic security codes that are unique to each transaction) to Apple. The Device Account Number can’t be decrypted by Apple but is stored in the Secure Element—an industry-standard, certified chip designed to store your payment information safely—on your device. Unlike with usual credit or debit card numbers, the card issuer can prevent its use on a magnetic stripe card, over the phone, or on websites. The Device Account Number in the Secure Element is isolated from iOS, watchOS, and macOS, is never stored on Apple servers, and is never backed up to iCloud.

    Apple doesn’t store or have access to the original card numbers of credit, debit, or prepaid cards that you add to Apple Pay. Apple Pay stores only a portion of your actual card numbers and a portion of your Device Account Numbers, along with a card description. Your cards are associated with your Apple ID to help you add and manage your cards across your devices.

    In addition, iCloud secures your Wallet data—like passes and transaction information—by encrypting it when it's sent over the Internet and storing it in an encrypted format when it's kept on Apple’s servers. You can disable iCloud support on your device by going to Settings > [your name] > iCloud and turning off Wallet.
    Once secured on the device, at least for credit cards, Apple Pay works exactly like a tap to pay credit card. Apple I believe does not even act as a clearing house with the exception of Apple Pay cash payments.
    05-03-2018 09:47 AM
  3. Frehley's Avatar
    Actually, you can just do three steps by omitting your first step. If you double click the button, even with the phone locked, it will take you to Apple Pay and then using FaceID will authorize the payment.
    Thanks for the tip...I'll try it the next time I use Apple Pay.
    05-11-2018 07:46 AM
  4. Lee_Bo's Avatar
    I just use my watch. :-)
    05-11-2018 08:12 AM
  5. eyesopen1111's Avatar
    I just use my watch. :-)
    This does work well!
    05-12-2018 04:28 AM
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