1. robertk328's Avatar
    I worry about my battery life when I am travelling overseas, as if I am out and about, I am not sure when I will be able to get to an electrical outlet, nor how long the battery will last trying to get connections on foreign networks.

    I also worry about it when I travel on weekends, as I may not be around outlets for over a day at a time.

    I'd love to have a battery that could last 2-3 days with heavy use. I'd live with a couple of mm thickness increase to achieve it.
    Portable charger is your best bet. Love mine -- I won't travel without it!
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-22-2016 03:03 PM
  2. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Charge my iPhone 6 every night,for over a year (well over 200 charges) and it still holds a charge the full day and plus some. Have not seen a need yet to worry about it.
    'Nuf said......I've done that with every iPhone I've had, with the exception of the iPhone 3G, and I've always maintained excellent battery life. Having said that, yes, I take my battery life seriously, but I do not worry about having to charging my battery throughout the day because I don't. I took my iPhone 6S Plus off the charge at around 8:30 this morning. It is now 3:26 PM and I'm at 86%. I doubt I'll be below 50% when I go to bed later tonight, but still, I'll let it charge overnight like I do EVERY night and be prepared for a full day's use from that single charge tomorrow...
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 01-22-2016 at 06:19 PM.
    01-22-2016 03:28 PM
  3. firedept10's Avatar
    Charge my iPhone 6 every night,for over a year (well over 200 charges) and it still holds a charge the full day and plus some. Have not seen a need yet to worry about it.
    Well stated taz323. I charge my phone every night and have with every iPhone I have ever owned. We have had 4 iPhone's in this household since they were introduced and we all leave them to charge every day. Never have we had a battery issue including an iPhone 5 that Apple recalled for a battery replacement, which we never had done because it was never an issue. Every phone of ours has work flawless and has always held an acceptable charge even a few years later. We still have that iPhone 5, since new in 2012 and it still has good battery life.

    Time to quit worrying about your battery OP and just enjoy your phone.
    taz323, Just_Me_D, mumfoau and 1 others like this.
    01-22-2016 06:10 PM
  4. Sherry_B's Avatar
    I don't worry about it much, although it's nice that my 6S battery outlasts my previous Android devices... by leaps and bounds.

    99% of the time my phone is plugged in, either at my desk when not in use or on my bedside table. This doesn't harm the battery or the device, since it stops charging once it reaches 100%. If my phone gets warm then it's due to something running causing it to overheat (most times, but not always, this is the CPU getting hot and not the battery). Lithium-ion batteries, as I understand it, for safety are supposed to stop charging (or is it shut down?) once it reaches a certain temperature.

    I received a Jackery for Christmas, so I'd carry that with me if I'm going to be out of the house for an extended period of time.

    With non-replaceable batteries
    They're replaceable... for a fee. If the battery has issues before the 1 year warranty is up then they'll replace it for free. After that you can take it into an Apple store and they'll replace it for you in the store. The fee I think is 70 something dollars or there abouts.
    Last edited by Sherry_B; 01-22-2016 at 06:55 PM.
    01-22-2016 06:14 PM
  5. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    Mine won't make it 2 years with a full days charge. I'm retired and am on the phone most of the day. My old 5 made it 25 months before the battery got to bad to use. I still use it a little, but the battery discharges quickly.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-22-2016 07:20 PM
  6. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    Omg I used to drive myself crazy when I had my first iPhone, the 4S about turning up things off to "preserve" my battery.....eeeeeehhhh! I waaaay over that now after having a 5c, 5S and currently my rosegold 6S+. I leave whatever I need now turned on and charge every night regardless of how much I have left over. Thursday night turning in for the night I still had 76% left(it was a lite day)...I plugged in anyway so I had 100% ready to go in the a.m.

    I plug in every night regardless....and I have AC+ so if I start to have battery issues I go to an Apple Store and take care of it

    Hinestly, I'm really SO OVER how much battery I use/don't use.
    01-22-2016 09:09 PM
  7. gernerttl's Avatar
    I'm not all that worried either. It takes about 500 recharge cycles to degrade a modern lithium ion battery by 20%. That comes out to approximately 2 to 2 1/2 years before the average user sees a significant degradation. Most of us don't keep our phones that long.
    01-22-2016 09:42 PM
  8. NoviMajster's Avatar
    You can post so many articles as you want, i speak from personal expirience:
    When i get a new phone; first few cycles i use it till it drains to zero and shuts off. Then to 1% and charge it to 100%.
    I NEVER let it pluged in for a long period of time when it s allready full. That is the most important thing to remember; your iphone fills up to 100% in about three hours. U should never let it plugged in for another 3-5 hours when its allready full. That destroys the battery.
    I have a lumia 1520 that s in its third year and it still lasts 48 hours, no problem whatsoever. Now i have a iphone 6s plus and i get excellent battery usage.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 05:42 AM
  9. Ariel Babalao's Avatar
    You can post so many articles as you want, i speak from personal expirience:
    When i get a new phone; first few cycles i use it till it drains to zero and shuts off. Then to 1% and charge it to 100%.
    I NEVER let it pluged in for a long period of time when it s allready full. That is the most important thing to remember; your iphone fills up to 100% in about three hours. U should never let it plugged in for another 3-5 hours when its allready full. That destroys the battery.
    I have a lumia 1520 that s in its third year and it still lasts 48 hours, no problem whatsoever. Now i have a iphone 6s plus and i get excellent battery usage.
    Wrong about not letting it on charge more than 5h after it reach 100%.
    But let it be if that help you to ease your mind about battery heath.
    01-23-2016 07:15 AM
  10. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    ...
    ... U should never let it plugged in for another 3-5 hours when its allready full. That destroys the battery.
    ....
    I've charged my iPhones overnight (longer than 5 hours) for years, and doing so has yet to destroy the battery.
    01-23-2016 07:36 AM
  11. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    You can post so many articles as you want, i speak from personal expirience:
    When i get a new phone; first few cycles i use it till it drains to zero and shuts off. Then to 1% and charge it to 100%.
    I NEVER let it pluged in for a long period of time when it s allready full. That is the most important thing to remember; your iphone fills up to 100% in about three hours. U should never let it plugged in for another 3-5 hours when its allready full. That destroys the battery.
    I have a lumia 1520 that s in its third year and it still lasts 48 hours, no problem whatsoever. Now i have a iphone 6s plus and i get excellent battery usage.
    When a battery reaches 100%, it will continue to charge a bit. 100% does not equal full. That's the % indicator showing that. It's not that precise. It's kind of like the gas gauge on your car. When it reaches the F, it'll hold some more. And, no, it doesn't hurt to leave it on the charger several hours after it's full.
    Sherry_B, maverick786us and pr1nce like this.
    01-23-2016 07:48 AM
  12. graigsmith's Avatar
    No what you are doing is harming the battery life. Those rules you are using are for older battery types. You should always top off. And charge whenever you can for best battery health.
    01-23-2016 08:59 AM
  13. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    No what you are doing is harming the battery life. Those rules you are using are for older battery types. You should always top off. And charge whenever you can for best battery health.
    Please use the quote option when replying so that readers will know to whom you're replying. Thanks.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 09:27 AM
  14. Sherry_B's Avatar
    No what you are doing is harming the battery life. Those rules you are using are for older battery types. You should always top off. And charge whenever you can for best battery health.

    With all due respect, you're wrong. The phone itself stops the current once it reaches 100%, and continues to work just as ledsteplin stated to maintain 100% till unplugged. This is a safety measure to prevent the battery from overheating due to a constant current. There are heat sensors in those batteries, otherwise battery apps would have no way to see those temperature readings.

    Using Google Scholar I could find no up to date scientific research to state otherwise.
    01-23-2016 10:57 AM
  15. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    No what you are doing is harming the battery life. Those rules you are using are for older battery types. You should always top off. And charge whenever you can for best battery health.
    Charging your iPhone overnight will not harm your battery in the slightest.
    You simply can't overcharge an iPhone, or any other modern electronic device, for that matter. Any device that uses a Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer battery must incorporate a charging circuit that cuts off charging power when the battery reaches 100%.
    In other words, when your iPhone is plugged in and reaches 100%, it switches to external power and simply runs from that.
    Similarly, charging your battery before it's fully depleted will also not harm your battery at all, and is actually the preferable way of charging your battery. While Lithium Ion batteries are rated for a limited number of "charge cycles' (about 500 in the case of the iPhone), the term "charge cycle" refers to complete recharges, and partial recharges simply use up partial charge cycles. In other words, every time you charge your iPhone up from 90%, you're using 1/10th, or 10%, of a complete charge cycle. This means you could charge your iPhone up from 90%-100% 5,000 times before you'd have to worry about running out of charge cycles.
    However, if you deliberately drain your battery to zero and then recharge it, instead of simply plugging it in when it needs to be charged, you're needlessly using up a complete charge cycle. Obviously if you're using your iPhone until the battery goes dead, that's fair, but there's no need to deliberately drain it before recharging it, and you'll actually shorten your battery life if you do so.

    The bottom line is that most people worry about their batteries way more than they need to, largely because of very real issues with older Nickel-Cadmium (NiCad) batteries that no longer apply with Lithium-Ion batteries yet remain persistent myths that refuse to die. For the vast majority of iPhone users, you're safe to plug your iPhone in when you need to, leave it plugged in as necessary, and use it normally. You're not hurting your battery by doing so unless you're a seriously atypical user.
    01-23-2016 11:02 AM
  16. Sherry_B's Avatar
    Any device that uses a Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer battery must incorporate a charging circuit that cuts off charging power when the battery reaches 100%.
    I learned something from all of this.. the name of the item that does this is called a charger ic chip. It's designed to automatically reduce to a trickle when charging is complete. This little chip is smart and does a few things more, too.

    Thank you for giving me the opportunity to learn something more.... you made me dig a little deeper.
    01-23-2016 11:12 AM
  17. WhiteiPadMini's Avatar
    With non-replaceable batteries, how many of you consider the longevity of your battery seriously?

    For example. These batteries have a very limited lifespan, where after 180-200 charges, the battery starts degrading. So lets say if someone unnecessarily charge for 1 sec, that will count as one count.

    I always have to take extra measure like...
    1) I do not put it on charging until the battery percentage is less than 10%.
    2) When I put it on charging I make sure that it is 100% charged, before taking it out.
    3) I never follow that casual policy where people put it on charging, if receive call they take it out and then put it again.

    How many of you, follow this strict battery practice, and is it really helpful in long life of the battery? Please share your openion
    "So lets say if someone unnecessarily charge for 1 sec, that will count as one count" - No, just no. It will not count as 1 cycle. If you went from 100% to 75% and then plugged it to fully charge it from there. That's just 25% of 1 cycle count. If then you went from 100% to 60% and then charged it to full then that's 40% and you already used 65% of 1 cycle count. Hope this make sense.

    1. It is never a good idea to use it till you reach 10% every single time. That just adds 1 cycle count every charge.
    This just puts more stress into your batteries and I do not recommend doing this. If you think your battery meter is not accurate then it's okay to drain below 10% but should only be done once every 2-3 month.
    2a. I usually unplug mine when fully charged since I never plug my phone to a wall I use the Anker Astro E7 series to charge my phone and usually when it's done charging the indicator on the battery pack turns off indicating that's no longer charging then I simply just un plug it.
    2b. You can still use the phone while it's charging. Just note that it may take a little longer to fully charge.
    3.It doesn't matter really. It's not like the old Ni-CD batteries where it suffers a memory effect.. Lithium batteries don't have the memory effect so doesn't really matter if you unplug it and use it and plug it again. That's what it's meant for.

    Me personally? I don't follow this strict battery practice and I simply just use my phone and charge it whenever I need do. Most people end up upgrading or buying a new phone every 1 year to 2 year so really it doesn't really matter. Plus it comes with a standard 1 year warranty and if the battery seems bad before the 1 year is over, you can always take it to the apple store and have the genius test it and if it's bad they can replace it for free before it's over.

    Just my 2 cents here.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 11:32 AM
  18. Swift2001's Avatar
    The iPhone 5 battery was a little skimpy. I had to buy a new battery in the second year. My 6 is now well into the second year, and on the average day, it's only reaching 50% most days by 7:00 or so. If I don't use it much because I'm really busy, I've seen it at 65% at 8:00 PM. So the battery is thriving. Since AT&T is ending the Unlimited 2-year plan, Hello iPhone 6s+ in May!
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 01:34 PM
  19. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    "So lets say if someone unnecessarily charge for 1 sec, that will count as one count" - No, just no. It will not count as 1 cycle. If you went from 100% to 75% and then plugged it to fully charge it from there. That's just 25% of 1 cycle count. If then you went from 100% to 60% and then charged it to full then that's 40% and you already used 65% of 1 cycle count. Hope this make sense.

    1. It is never a good idea to use it till you reach 10% every single time. That just adds 1 cycle count every charge.
    This just puts more stress into your batteries and I do not recommend doing this. If you think your battery meter is not accurate then it's okay to drain below 10% but should only be done once every 2-3 month.
    2a. I usually unplug mine when fully charged since I never plug my phone to a wall I use the Anker Astro E7 series to charge my phone and usually when it's done charging the indicator on the battery pack turns off indicating that's no longer charging then I simply just un plug it.
    2b. You can still use the phone while it's charging. Just note that it may take a little longer to fully charge.
    3.It doesn't matter really. It's not like the old Ni-CD batteries where it suffers a memory effect.. Lithium batteries don't have the memory effect so doesn't really matter if you unplug it and use it and plug it again. That's what it's meant for.

    Me personally? I don't follow this strict battery practice and I simply just use my phone and charge it whenever I need do. Most people end up upgrading or buying a new phone every 1 year to 2 year so really it doesn't really matter. Plus it comes with a standard 1 year warranty and if the battery seems bad before the 1 year is over, you can always take it to the apple store and have the genius test it and if it's bad they can replace it for free before it's over.

    Just my 2 cents here.
    No. If you run it down 1%, then you have used 1/100 th of a charge cycle. If you run it down to 10%, then you have used 9/10 of a charge cycle.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 01:44 PM
  20. Swift2001's Avatar
    $100 for a replacement at an Apple Store.
    01-23-2016 05:10 PM
  21. mayconvert's Avatar
    I never keep a phone for longer than a year, but the battery costs $79 at any apple store if I somehow decided I needed to keep the device for 3+ years...
    Worrying about battery is a waste of time. just throw the thing on the charger when you need some juice and go about your day. I have a 6S+ I can go 2 days if I want, but that takes it below 20% I usually get home with 60%. Charging, sometimes I get to 100%, sometimes I get to 80%.

    Sometimes I just throw it on the charger for the 20 minutes I am getting ready in the morning. Couldn't care less about a $79 battery and trying to squeeze 3+ years out of it. The battery will last until the contract or carrier financing is done, and then apple will buy it back to go towards the new phone.
    01-23-2016 05:37 PM
  22. ipooed's Avatar
    I care, one reason I sold my 6s and upgraded to the 6s plus. I have everything turned off and I mean everything from 3D Touch and Apple Music to location and Siri. And am lucky to get 8 hours before I reach 20%

    I got at least 10hrs+ on my 6 plus. I don't want a big honker of a phone like the 6s+ but if I didn't I would go crazy plugging in all the time.

    I try not to let it bother me but I seem to worry about it more than I should
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 08:23 PM
  23. Derrick4Real's Avatar
    i don't think about it unless it get's does that thing where it jumps from like 15% to 1% then dead in one minute. I normally do the recalibration thing then and drain it fully then charge it fully.

    But my battery life is decent and i don't worry much and i surely don't think about it as much as you.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 09:04 PM
  24. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    I care, one reason I sold my 6s and upgraded to the 6s plus. I have everything turned off and I mean everything from 3D Touch and Apple Music to location and Siri. And am lucky to get 8 hours before I reach 20%

    I got at least 10hrs+ on my 6 plus. I don't want a big honker of a phone like the 6s+ but if I didn't I would go crazy plugging in all the time.

    I try not to let it bother me but I seem to worry about it more than I should
    What is "everything"? Some things don't use much battery. Bluetooth doesn't. What uses battery most? Brightness, GPS usage for long periods, a few apps that run in the background too much. Like Facebook and TapaTalk. So does the stock Mail app. Those are the biggies. I keep my brightness at about 30% and don't worry much about the rest.
    maverick786us likes this.
    01-23-2016 10:17 PM
  25. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    I learned something from all of this.. the name of the item that does this is called a charger ic chip. It's designed to automatically reduce to a trickle when charging is complete. This little chip is smart and does a few things more, too.

    Thank you for giving me the opportunity to learn something more.... you made me dig a little deeper.
    Yep. That chip reduces charging power when the battery reaches 80% and then further reduces it when it's nearly full.

    That's why you see your phone charging really quickly before 80%, and then becoming slower to reach 100% after 80%.

    Honestly, don't fret too much about leaving your phone on a charger overnight. It won't overcharge since modern electronics are much better at safeguarding the battery than earlier counterparts.
    01-23-2016 10:47 PM
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