1. Flapalms239's Avatar
    Ahh I see I haven't really ever bought anything at CVS LOL.
    Extreme waste of paper :-)
    ame likes this.
    10-27-2014 09:50 PM
  2. natasftw's Avatar
    I'm thinking this might be somewhat comparable to the Face(play)book migration to messenger. Force your customers to adopt your "new and improved" version of a service you were already providing gratis. I live next door to a cvs. But I will make the effort to use Walgreens now instead. I have something against companies who cripple existing technology at my expense to fatten their own pockets.
    You call that crippling? Hyperbole much?

    What expense is it giving you?
    10-27-2014 10:07 PM
  3. essay2u's Avatar
    You call that crippling? Hyperbole much?

    What expense is it giving you?
    What are you even talking about? THEY SHUT DOWN ALL NFC PAYMENTS on terminals that were ACCEPTING NFC PAYMENTS. i.e "crippled" existing technology.

    Read much?!?!?!!!!
    10-27-2014 10:22 PM
  4. nj1266's Avatar
    Don't shop at CVS or Rite Aid. Don't have much interest in mobile payments either. I'm just gonna enjoy the show.



    Apple and Google would be dragged into court the next day if they blocked that app on Anti-trust violations. Assuming the app is in full compliance with both store front guidelines.
    They do not have to announce it. They do not even have to communicate with each other. If one does it, then the next one would follow.
    10-28-2014 01:22 AM
  5. natasftw's Avatar
    What are you even talking about? THEY SHUT DOWN ALL NFC PAYMENTS on terminals that were ACCEPTING NFC PAYMENTS. i.e "crippled" existing technology.

    Read much?!?!?!!!!
    /sigh

    They also don't sell cars. I guess they've crippled vehicle technology.

    If we believe they're the only place that accepts NFC payments and that NFC payments are the only use for NFC technology, you're showing a crippling effect. Here in the real world, the impact is negligible. Common sense much?
    10-28-2014 01:30 AM
  6. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    I am sorry but this is not capitalism. This is collusion among a few actors in the marketplace to subvert innovation. Capitalism is about individual buyers and sellers meeting in the marketplace and using freely accessible tools to exchange goods.

    What these bad actors are doing is to subvert technological innovation in order to save a few bucks and add to their profits and to mine my data for marketing purposes.

    If they were really interested in the free market then they would let BOTH NFC and CurrentC stand and would allow the users to decide which one to use.

    As I understand it, CurrentC is old tech and is not user friendly at all. It requires far more steps to use than AP NFC or even Google Wallet. Second, using my ACH account rather than my CC to purchase goods does not afford me the needed fraud protection.

    If anything, this practice is anti competitive and should be investigated by the FTC.
    They're businesses and I don't blame a business for trying to "save a few bucks" as you put it. Until you're looking at CVS' books, you're in no position to judge whether what they're saving are a "few bucks" or not. Them mining your data for marketing purposes is totally in your control no matter what. You can either just pay cash or not shop with any merchant that doesn't use Apple Pay even if you could easily pay with cash.

    I agree that the technology that they're using is old, but they made deals with CurrentC and as far as we know, these merchants wanted to welcome Apple Pay with open arms but probably got pressured by CurrentC to be rid of it. It could also be that some merchants have exclusivity deals for a certain amount of time. They are in no position to have to explain themselves on contract terms to us.

    A merchant can go as far as not even accepting credit cards period. That's not anti-competitive at all. Go to Peter Luger's in New York and see if they'll accept anything but cash or a debit card and tell them they're anti-competitive.
    10-28-2014 01:39 AM
  7. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    And for the suggestion of Apple and Google coming together to rid their app stores of the CurrentC app is fighting what you call collusion with collusion.
    10-28-2014 01:45 AM
  8. nj1266's Avatar
    They're businesses and I don't blame a business for trying to "save a few bucks" as you put it. Until you're looking at CVS' books, you're in no position to judge whether what they're saving are a "few bucks" or not. Them mining your data for marketing purposes is totally in your control no matter what. You can either just pay cash or not shop with any merchant that doesn't use Apple Pay even if you could easily pay with cash.

    I agree that the technology that they're using is old, but they made deals with CurrentC and as far as we know, these merchants wanted to welcome Apple Pay with open arms but probably got pressured by CurrentC to be rid of it. It could also be that some merchants have exclusivity deals for a certain amount of time. They are in no position to have to explain themselves on contract terms to us.

    A merchant can go as far as not even accepting credit cards period. That's not anti-competitive at all. Go to Peter Luger's in New York and see if they'll accept anything but cash or a debit card and tell them they're anti-competitive.
    Since a business is there to maximize its profits and has a responsibility to do so for the shareholder, then what would have been the harm of allowing NFC (they already invested in these POS machines) to continue while waiting for CurrentC to come online?

    They already had the machines and they would have maximized their profits by allowing consumers to use the machines. Turning them off to try and undermine Apple Pay smacks of protectionism and fear. If I was a shareholder in these companies, I would not be happy because the CEO is not looking after value of my shares.
    10-28-2014 02:01 AM
  9. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    Since a business is there to maximize its profits and has a responsibility to do so for the shareholder, then what would have been the harm of allowing NFC (they already invested in these POS machines) to continue while waiting for CurrentC to come online?

    They already had the machines and they would have maximized their profits by allowing consumers to use the machines. Turning them off to try and undermine Apple Pay smacks of protectionism and fear. If I was a shareholder in these companies, I would not be happy because the CEO is not looking after value of my shares.
    Again, you're not in the board meetings to decide how much money you think they would be giving up by de-activating the terminals for that period of time vs when CurrentC comes around. I'm sure the CEO's and all their financial advisors around them have shareholders' interests in mind here and decided their method vs yours works out better for them.
    10-28-2014 02:05 AM
  10. mistabritt's Avatar
    In my personal opinion this is all about money (the root of all evil). Having said that I will use  Pay in stores that accept it. I may think twice about visiting merchants that refuse to support  Pay unless I absolutely have to purchase from that particular store. I think and hope in the long run that stores/companies that are initially refusing to support this will soon learn wise up, because from the little bit that I've read on this supposed CurrentC campaign is that its not stacking up to be what everyone is hoping it to be, although it's still in it's infancy. On the flip-side, even though Apple may still have a few kinks/bugs to iron out, plus with awesome reviews that's flooding the web, it kinda puts it into perspective and gives Apple in my opinion, one-up on competitors.
    10-28-2014 02:18 AM
  11. nj1266's Avatar
    Again, you're not in the board meetings to decide how much money you think they would be giving up by de-activating the terminals for that period of time vs when CurrentC comes around. I'm side the CEO's and all their financial advisors around them have shareholders' interests in mind here and decided their method vs yours works out better for them.
    Neither are you!!! So what makes what you type more valid than what I type? You are making suppositions and I am stating what is happening on the ground.

    1. NFC existed before ApplePay and was being used by these CVS and RiteAid.

    2. CurrentC is not active and will not be active anytime soon.

    3. ApplePay is safer, and more private than CurrentC.

    4. There are one million cc and debit card holders that activated ApplePay.

    5. There must have been Android smartphone users using NFC otherwise these companies would not have invested in the tech and kept it active.

    6. Allowing consumers to diversify their method of payment will earn the business more revenue especially since ApplePay became active and the purchasing power and loyalty of those who use Apple products.

    7. Therefore, logically, shutting off NFC devices will hurt in two ways. First, you will lose the value of the investment you made in these machines. Second, you will lose customers who like NFC Google Wallet, ApplePay and value their privacy.

    8. If you are a CEO, you are not maximizing shareholder value. You are costing the shareholders money. You have wasted money on machines that are not going to be used to their full capacity. You could have invested in cheaper machines that did not have the NFC chip. And you are turning away customers by denying them an alternative method of payment. A business wants MORE customers, not less.

    None of what I said is based on suppositions like yours. They are logical business decisions based on the available facts.
    mistabritt likes this.
    10-28-2014 02:21 AM
  12. essay2u's Avatar
    /sigh

    They also don't sell cars. I guess they've crippled vehicle technology.

    If we believe they're the only place that accepts NFC payments and that NFC payments are the only use for NFC technology, you're showing a crippling effect. Here in the real world, the impact is negligible. Common sense much?
    Sadly your car analogy is far fetching, if not completely off the mark. You needn't try to voice your opinion by attempting to attack my own. Maybe you needed me to add a pronoun to understand I was talking about crippling "their" technology or maybe you're just that literal.

    Based on the title of the thread "your opinion," I did just that and voiced my opinion. The fact that you wish to argue about my perspective with no real information is insane and trollish. Or maybe shillish? You can decide since you are the wordsmith.
    10-28-2014 06:49 AM
  13. ame's Avatar
    I don't have RiteAid here, so no loss there, but I almost never go to CVS because Walgreens is literally right across the street. We only just started getting CVS in the last year. Walgreens accepts it, Ill just go there instead.

    I don't need to go to Best Buy, I don't patronize Walmart under any circumstance, I can buy my electronics elsewhere than Best Buy which I almost never shop at anyway and I don't usually go to 7-11 when QT is right down the block and has better everything. I can work around their competition pretty easily.

    Regardless, I don't look at this as replacing my wallet yet. I'd like to one day, but thus far, no. NFC isn't huge here yet like it is in other parts of the world. Someday maybe. But our banks don't care as much yet about securely getting our money like in other places, otherwise we'd already have NFC and RFID.
    10-28-2014 07:46 AM
  14. sanibel's Avatar
    If you're planning on boycotting CVS, don't stop there... Here's a handy list of CurrentC retailers... Your opinion on Rite Aid and CVS removing NFC payments-currentc-retailers-logo.png
    BreakingKayfabe and LCW like this.
    10-28-2014 08:27 AM
  15. natasftw's Avatar
    Sadly your car analogy is far fetching, if not completely off the mark. You needn't try to voice your opinion by attempting to attack my own. Maybe you needed me to add a pronoun to understand I was talking about crippling "their" technology or maybe you're just that literal.

    Based on the title of the thread "your opinion," I did just that and voiced my opinion. The fact that you wish to argue about my perspective with no real information is insane and trollish. Or maybe shillish? You can decide since you are the wordsmith.
    It's not "their" technology. If you added that, you'd be sounding more foolish. I'm sorry that you believe I'm a troll because I pointed out you're overreacting. If you wanted to discuss purely in the context of their devices, they haven't crippled anything. They've simply turned it off. They're free to turn them back on at any time. They haven't gone store to store with a baseball bat breaking the devices. They're not crippled. Suggesting otherwise is "insane."

    It's not that I'm being "that literal." It's that you're using that much hyperbole.

    Why do people still think an opinion means it's alright to say anything without it being questioned? Let's start with a base opinion that I'm fairly certain everyone that posts here will agree is bad. The KKK believe that there is something genetic that makes whites a superior race. It's founded in nothing. It makes "literally" no sense. It's an opinion. If after telling you that whites are better than blacks because they're white, would you say "oh, that's your opinion. Sweet. It must be right because it's an opinion."? Or would you say "seriously? here's one of many reasons why what you just said doesn't make any sense."?

    Continue talking down to me. Continue suggesting I can't read. It won't make you, or what you're saying, any more intelligent. But, you're so convinced I'm here to troll. So, why avoid the simple question? You've opted to continue overreacting in your posts to me. Why not tell me a single expense this has caused you. Did this decision break all of your credit/debit cards? Are they only able to work with ApplePay? Did it render you unable to carry cash? Were these the only stores you shopped at so the decision has left you unable to pay for overpriced goods? What expense are you experiencing as a result of this decision?
    10-28-2014 08:30 AM
  16. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    I don't get the big fuss here! Some of you seem to be taking these businesses not using Pay a bit too personally, as if they had bad mouthed your iPhone. So you can't use Pay at these businesses. So what? They still take cash, checks and plastic. Are you so ingrained in what your iPhone can do that it upsets you if you can't use it to pay for your Lortabs and Viagra? It's a payment method, for crying out loud! There are other methods. And you want to argue this issue? SMH I do my pharmacy business at a small Mom and Pop pharmacy. I like it there. Will they implement Pay? Probably not. But they do take my debit card and cash. I'm ok with that. I'm not going to switch to Walgreens just for Pay. That would be ridiculous. Some need to come to terms with the fact, that not all businesses are going to accept Pay as a payment method. Boycotting those that don't is also ridiculous. Too many of you want it where you can use your iPhone to pay for everything. That's not going to happen. All of you need to chill!


    Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
    Smply_Rcklss likes this.
    10-28-2014 09:27 AM
  17. neurodave's Avatar
    I don't get the big fuss here! Some of you seem to be taking these businesses not using Pay a bit too personally, as if they had bad mouthed your iPhone. So you can't use Pay at these businesses. So what? They still take cash, checks and plastic. Are you so ingrained in what your iPhone can do that it upsets you if you can't use it to pay for your Lortabs and Viagra? It's a payment method, for crying out loud! There are other methods. And you want to argue this issue? SMH I do my pharmacy business at a small Mom and Pop pharmacy. I like it there. Will they implement Pay? Probably not. But they do take my debit card and cash. I'm ok with that. I'm not going to switch to Walgreens just for Pay. That would be ridiculous. Some need to come to terms with the fact, that not all businesses are going to accept Pay as a payment method. Boycotting those that don't is also ridiculous. Too many of you want it where you can use your iPhone to pay for everything. That's not going to happen. All of you need to chill!


    Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
    The point is not that they DON'T accept Apple Pay, but rather the reasons WHY they don't. Not only that, we are discussing NFC Payments as a whole here, not just Apple Pay. I am not biased, which is why I put it all into one category, one that includes Apple Pay and Google Wallet. I am very well aware that Apple Pay is not a new thing, as NFC Payments have been around for a few years now. The ire comes from the companies involved inadvertently disabling (read: crippling) their NFC machines out of the complete blue. This coming after they had spent a few days accepting Apple Pay and years accepting all other NFC enabled forms of payment. It shows the gluttony companies have and how far they will go to save a few bucks to fill their pockets. They have literally isolated themselves in the mobile payments field simply because it fills their bottom end.

    If they would have the machines enabled AND were releasing CurrentC, I honestly wouldn't care. I'd come in, pay with my iPhone, and leave and CurrentC wouldn't even matter to me. Heck, prior to this, I didn't even know CurrentC existed....and that's coming from someone who is generally on top of technology news.
    nj1266 likes this.
    10-28-2014 10:38 AM
  18. calebt's Avatar
    Who cares what ever technology wins wins, will it change the way I shop, no, will it change the way I use mobile payments yes. I prefer NFC, it's a more secure payment method also much faster at the checkout. Current C I have to unlock my phone, open an app, generate a QR code and then have scanned. That is a waste of time, I will not use Current C.


    Sent from my wrapped in leather iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by calebt; 10-28-2014 at 03:43 PM.
    10-28-2014 10:42 AM
  19. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    The point is not that they DON'T accept Apple Pay, but rather the reasons WHY they don't. Not only that, we are discussing NFC Payments as a whole here, not just Apple Pay. I am not biased, which is why I put it all into one category, one that includes Apple Pay and Google Wallet. I am very well aware that Apple Pay is not a new thing, as NFC Payments have been around for a few years now. The ire comes from the companies involved inadvertently disabling (read: crippling) their NFC machines out of the complete blue. This coming after they had spent a few days accepting Apple Pay and years accepting all other NFC enabled forms of payment. It shows the gluttony companies have and how far they will go to save a few bucks to fill their pockets. They have literally isolated themselves in the mobile payments field simply because it fills their bottom end.

    If they would have the machines enabled AND were releasing CurrentC, I honestly wouldn't care. I'd come in, pay with my iPhone, and leave and CurrentC wouldn't even matter to me. Heck, prior to this, I didn't even know CurrentC existed....and that's coming from someone who is generally on top of technology news.
    I get all that. I was just trying to defuse what was becoming a heated argument. I'd hate to see this thread closed for 24 hours for a cool down!


    Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
    10-28-2014 12:59 PM
  20. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    Here's another interesting article on CurrentC and merchant's dislike of CCs. http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/8755/296895
    10-28-2014 01:01 PM
  21. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    Neither are you!!! So what makes what you type more valid than what I type? You are making suppositions and I am stating what is happening on the ground.

    Because you're making points as to why you think it's not good for the business to remove NFC. I don't blame them for making that decision. You're stating why they shouldn't do it when they already have. I don't have to sit there in their meetings to know that they did what they think is in the best interest of their business. You're being contrarian to what they're doing with their money and shareholders so that's why I state you're not in their board meetings to defend your position. I don't have to sit there to know why they did what they did.

    1. NFC existed before ApplePay and was being used by these CVS and RiteAid.

    Okay. And they probably weren't as frequently used as they assumed they would be with Apple Pay. They can remove it if they so choose to.

    2. CurrentC is not active and will not be active anytime soon.

    Because they don't want Apple Pay to catch on. Nothing wrong with that.

    3. ApplePay is safer, and more private than CurrentC.

    I'm not debating that at all. It's irrelevant to the point I'm making to you.

    4. There are one million cc and debit card holders that activated ApplePay.

    And?

    5. There must have been Android smartphone users using NFC otherwise these companies would not have invested in the tech and kept it active.

    Apple getting in on NFC is what NFC needed to become prominent.

    6. Allowing consumers to diversify their method of payment will earn the business more revenue especially since ApplePay became active and the purchasing power and loyalty of those who use Apple products.

    Of course it will. Contact them and let them know how you feel.

    7. Therefore, logically, shutting off NFC devices will hurt in two ways. First, you will lose the value of the investment you made in these machines. Second, you will lose customers who like NFC Google Wallet, ApplePay and value their privacy.

    You assume that anyone who planned on using ApplePay is like you and will never ever shop at those places again and not just spend cash or swipe their credit card like we've been doing for years.

    8. If you are a CEO, you are not maximizing shareholder value. You are costing the shareholders money. You have wasted money on machines that are not going to be used to their full capacity. You could have invested in cheaper machines that did not have the NFC chip. And you are turning away customers by denying them an alternative method of payment. A business wants MORE customers, not less.

    When you become a CEO, let us know here so you can have the right to say what a CEO should do.

    None of what I said is based on suppositions like yours. They are logical business decisions based on the available facts.

    I am not debating what I think is logical business. I'm defending what I think they have a right to do as a business. That's different.
    My answers are in red.
    10-28-2014 01:25 PM
  22. HankAZ's Avatar
    Who cares what ever technology wins wins, will it change the way I shop, no, will it change the way I use mobile payments yes. I prefer NFC, it's a more secure payment method also much faster at the checkout. Current C I have to unlock my phone, open an app, generate a QR code and then have scanned. That is a waste of time.
    As far as I am concerned, it will change the way I shop. Nobody is getting direct access to my bank accounts. No way. No how. Period.

    So, now, while I will actively seek to shop where Pay is accepted (for my convenience), I will never use CurrentC, as it’s presently designed. That may not preclude me from ever shopping at a store that uses the CurrentC process (if it ever does become a reality), I will NOT use the CurrentC process. Cash or chip and pin CC only.
    10-28-2014 01:49 PM
  23. essay2u's Avatar
    It's not "their" technology. If you added that, you'd be sounding more foolish. I'm sorry that you believe I'm a troll because I pointed out you're overreacting. If you wanted to discuss purely in the context of their devices, they haven't crippled anything. They've simply turned it off. They're free to turn them back on at any time. They haven't gone store to store with a baseball bat breaking the devices. They're not crippled. Suggesting otherwise is "insane."

    It's not that I'm being "that literal." It's that you're using that much hyperbole.

    Why do people still think an opinion means it's alright to say anything without it being questioned? Let's start with a base opinion that I'm fairly certain everyone that posts here will agree is bad. The KKK believe that there is something genetic that makes whites a superior race. It's founded in nothing. It makes "literally" no sense. It's an opinion. If after telling you that whites are better than blacks because they're white, would you say "oh, that's your opinion. Sweet. It must be right because it's an opinion."? Or would you say "seriously? here's one of many reasons why what you just said doesn't make any sense."?

    Continue talking down to me. Continue suggesting I can't read. It won't make you, or what you're saying, any more intelligent. But, you're so convinced I'm here to troll. So, why avoid the simple question? You've opted to continue overreacting in your posts to me. Why not tell me a single expense this has caused you. Did this decision break all of your credit/debit cards? Are they only able to work with ApplePay? Did it render you unable to carry cash? Were these the only stores you shopped at so the decision has left you unable to pay for overpriced goods? What expense are you experiencing as a result of this decision?
    And you say you're not literal. The expense I am talking about is the expense of my privacy. The expense of having my data collected, mined, and possibly sold. The expense is not only out of my pocket in terms of money, but also figurative. I bought a $600 phone. I bought it with the understanding that I would be able to use it to make payments. I could, at first, make said payments at any store of my choosing that already had the technology in place and active. Then the retailers decided to turn off the technology, e.g. cripple it at their retail locations. I don't like that since I could use it 4 days ago, but now I can't. Now I have an expensive phone that is not being allowed to do one of the very things it was intended to do. That makes me upset. I decide to use a different retail store for a different experience, because MY OPINION is that it isn't really fair to the consumer to replace a more secure method of payment with a less secure one. Then you come along and argue with me (and especially my wording). Nobody (especially not me) said that I am right about this. It is rather my experience - and my opinion is based on said experience. If I said all green people are jerks based on how many annoying green people I have had to deal with, would I be wrong? Or would that just be my experience? Perhaps an ill-informed conclusion, but still within my rights to have it and not feel that I needed to defend it when asked how I FEEL ABOUT GREEN PEOPLE!!! my point - you don't have to agree. Reading a post does not imply consent.
    10-28-2014 01:57 PM
  24. essay2u's Avatar
    The point is not that they DON'T accept Apple Pay, but rather the reasons WHY they don't. Not only that, we are discussing NFC Payments as a whole here, not just Apple Pay. I am not biased, which is why I put it all into one category, one that includes Apple Pay and Google Wallet. I am very well aware that Apple Pay is not a new thing, as NFC Payments have been around for a few years now. The ire comes from the companies involved inadvertently disabling (read: crippling) their NFC machines out of the complete blue. This coming after they had spent a few days accepting Apple Pay and years accepting all other NFC enabled forms of payment. It shows the gluttony companies have and how far they will go to save a few bucks to fill their pockets. They have literally isolated themselves in the mobile payments field simply because it fills their bottom end.

    If they would have the machines enabled AND were releasing CurrentC, I honestly wouldn't care. I'd come in, pay with my iPhone, and leave and CurrentC wouldn't even matter to me. Heck, prior to this, I didn't even know CurrentC existed....and that's coming from someone who is generally on top of technology news.

    How come when you say "crippling," nobody sends you 5 messages about how you are overreacting and using the wrong language? lol
    neurodave likes this.
    10-28-2014 02:00 PM
  25. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    And you say you're not literal. The expense I am talking about is the expense of my privacy. The expense of having my data collected, mined, and possibly sold. The expense is not only out of my pocket in terms of money, but also figurative. I bought a $600 phone. I bought it with the understanding that I would be able to use it to make payments. I could, at first, make said payments at any store of my choosing that already had the technology in place and active. Then the retailers decided to turn off the technology, e.g. cripple it at their retail locations. I don't like that since I could use it 4 days ago, but now I can't. Now I have an expensive phone that is not being allowed to do one of the very things it was intended to do. That makes me upset. I decide to use a different retail store for a different experience, because MY OPINION is that it isn't really fair to the consumer to replace a more secure method of payment with a less secure one. Then you come along and argue with me (and especially my wording). Nobody (especially not me) said that I am right about this. It is rather my experience - and my opinion is based on said experience. If I said all green people are jerks based on how many annoying green people I have had to deal with, would I be wrong? Or would that just be my experience? Perhaps an ill-informed conclusion, but still within my rights to have it and not feel that I needed to defend it when asked how I FEEL ABOUT GREEN PEOPLE!!! my point - you don't have to agree. Reading a post does not imply consent.
    Just because they would rather replace the NFC system with their CurrentC system doesn't mean you are forced to use it. I agree. CurrentC sucks, it's evil, and it eats babies. But you're making it sound like it is your only option because ApplePay won't be accepted by those merchants. This is why it looks like an overreaction on your part.

    Take the approach that HankAZ has made and stop pretending like CVS and other retailers have backed you into a corner.
    10-28-2014 02:07 PM
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