1. DannyMichel's Avatar
    You made the comment that the fastest Verizon evdo can go is 1.4 Mbps. I post evidence that this is not the case. You complain that the test was done on an android phone.

    I have also had faster results with a Verizon iPhone 4. The phone isn't with me though and I can't take a screenshot of the results, but evdo a is evdo a, if a thunderbolt can do it an iPhone can do it.
    a thunderbolt is a 4g phone. also, if I'm not mistaken, it's also a talk and surf phone. and while you might be saying that 'if a thunderbolt can do it regarding 3g, an 'iPhone can do it', that's not the case either.

    but regardless.....
    does it really mater if it's 7 or 10 times faster? it's still at least SEVEN TIMES faster
    10-25-2011 09:52 AM
  2. anon62607's Avatar
    a thunderbolt is a 4g phone. also, if I'm not mistaken, it's also a talk and surf phone. and while you might be saying that 'if a thunderbolt can do it regarding 3g, an 'iPhone can do it', that's not the case either.

    but regardless.....
    It uses 3G in non 4G areas, and at the time where I lived (Portland, Oregon) there was no LTE service. The LTE tests were done either at the airport where there was 4G or in other cities.

    The SVDO portion makes no difference in the bandwidth to the phone and regardless has been disabled on my particular phone since the 4G+eHURD outage on Verizon early this year (which forced thunderbolts down to 1xRTT unless svdo was disabled).

    The fastest I've yet seen on a AT&T 4S posted here is 10 Mbps, and the average certainly isn't that. I have a long list of AT&T speedtest results in which the performance is around 2.5 Mbps. This is with a 4, so you could estimate those tests on a 4S would have been 5 Mbps, since 4S can despread 15/16 codes instead of 10/16, and FEC is 31/32 instead of 3/4, which would make AT&T about 2.5 times faster.

    And I imagine you would expect AT&T to be about 4 times faster, as HSPA+ is deployed on 5 MHz and evdo is deployed on 1.25 MHz and both use the same order modulation in the best case on iPhone.
    10-25-2011 10:11 AM
  3. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    I don't see where this thread is going.
    10-25-2011 04:48 PM
  4. anon62607's Avatar
    I don't see where this thread is going.
    the fact that 4G is not formally defined is destroying the mobile phone internet forums.

    the original question should have stated:
    "Can iphone 4S connect to *LTE* once Verizon deploys LTE in my area"
    the answer would have been:
    "no"

    That would have been the end of it. But instead someone brought up that there is no "true 4G" in the US, which follows on with the inevitable "there is no such thing as true 4G, it isn't defined, you're thinking of IMT-Advanced" and so on.

    Usually someone brings up that Verizon is using CDMA, and then there's another similar discussion that 3GPP HSPA also uses CDMA and there's nothing inherently inferior about CDMA vs TDMA and in fact both HSPA and EVDO use time division and code division, it's just that EVDO is in 1.25 MHz and HSPA (also called WCDMA) in 5 MHz and that's the real underlying advantage and so on.

    The threads then usually touch on the technical aspects of LTE-Advanced vs LTE, and multicarrier HSPA vs regular (rel 5) HSPA, the advantages of bonded carriers in sector throughput vs. using stacked sectors.

    Around this time the 700 MHz vs 2500 MHz debate comes up and if better performance can be had inside buildings at 700 MHz in 10 MHz or 2500 MHz in 20 MHz with appropriate process gain.

    At some point in there amplifier design for 802.16m vs LTE-Advanced will come up along with associated power considerations.

    Then the thread will shut down. A few days or weeks later someone will use the term 4G again and the whole thing will start over.

    That's where it's going. It's part of internet life.
    10-25-2011 05:44 PM
54 123
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD