1. alex6speed's Avatar
    Yeah, I agree that there was a huge lack of doing homework here. It took me a whole month to decide if I wanted to go with a iPhone now, or wait until the Blackberry Onyx came out. After some time, I realized that I don't need a phone for work, per say. I just needed something that does basic contacting and organizing (no need for meeting schedules or anything). Otherwise, I would have went with the Blackberry Bold or wait for the Onyx (I was with AT&T in the first place, and would have to wait until November to actually be out of my contract).

    All in all, I love my iPhone. Sure, it doesn't do everything above every other cell phone out there, but what device truly does?
    07-14-2009 02:06 AM
  2. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    I still don't understand how people think the Calendar app is lame. I think it works great.
    07-14-2009 06:07 AM
  3. minimo3's Avatar
    The iPhone calendar seems alright as long as you've never used PalmOS or Windows Mobile calendars. I would rate smartphone platform calendars in the following order (from best to worst):

    PalmOS > WebOS > Windows Mobile > Blackberry / iPhone > Symbian

    Just a small sampling of missing/subpar features in the iPhone calendar include:

    • No week view
    • No Agenda view showing you all your day's appointments and tasks
    • Month view has no color coding/icons
    • Day view doesn't compress unbooked time, have to scroll up/down
    • Weak repeating event support e.g. Last friday of the month
    • No floating events
    • No categories e.g. work, personal, school
    • Takes about 8 clicks (not counting typing) to add a new event vs 1 click in PalmOS
    • Date picker makes it difficult to pinpoint particular days e.g. The last Saturday in July. A traditional month drop-down would be better


    Yes I realize that some features of these are available via MobileMe or iCal but that relegates the iPhone calendar to be a read-only copy. I think the point of the OP is that on other platforms the mobile device can be used to input/manipulate the calendar WITHOUT using a desktop app.
    07-14-2009 07:26 AM
  4. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    What about Pocket Informant or Calengoo? They both sync with Google Calenders, which is what I need. Are either one of those any good?
    07-14-2009 07:34 AM
  5. Alli's Avatar
    Pocket Informant is making the iPhone calendar bearable, but it's still not all the way there yet.

    New question - why is the immediate response to the smallest complaint "you should have done your homework?" Did it ever occur to some people that those of us with complaints did do our homework and went into the purchase with full knowledge of the limitations and made the purchase anyway? Knowing the limitations does not equal liking or being satisfied with them.
    07-14-2009 09:04 AM
  6. chobbs1's Avatar
    It is how strongly th op worded the thread. If he knew the limitations and bought anyway there would be no reason for such strong language. The choice of words suggest that the op was blidsided by the lack of functionality.

    IMHO. The calender has had enough function for me. I have not used any other platform. My past phones had calenders but I never used them. Too difficult and did not have an easy clear way to sync. So for a dummy like me. The iPhone cal and I cal were a perfect solution.
    07-14-2009 09:13 AM
  7. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    Exactly. And then when you add Google Calendar sync to it all, now it's invaluable.
    07-14-2009 10:15 AM
  8. lionheartednyhc's Avatar
    In regards to the "why didn't you do your homework" line people keep using, here is an idea. And it will probably make some of the "apple is jesus" people have heart attacks.

    WHY DIDN'T APPLE DO ITS HOMEWORK?

    If you are competing for smart phone users, you could at least make a calendar that somewhat matches the competition in features (or hell, matches your OWN program iCal in features.)
    07-14-2009 11:25 AM
  9. Alli's Avatar
    Brave post, lionheartednyhc!
    07-14-2009 12:15 PM
  10. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    In regards to the "why didn't you do your homework" line people keep using, here is an idea. And it will probably make some of the "apple is jesus" people have heart attacks.

    WHY DIDN'T APPLE DO ITS HOMEWORK?

    If you are competing for smart phone users, you could at least make a calendar that somewhat matches the competition in features (or hell, matches your OWN program iCal in features.)
    Well, the calendar app is good enough for me. I also use the Google Calendar synch, which is great.

    Plus, I chose to find the good capabilities of the iPhone, instead of constantly saying that it can't do MMS and tethering.
    07-14-2009 12:24 PM
  11. touchyphone's Avatar
    In regards to the "why didn't you do your homework" line people keep using, here is an idea. And it will probably make some of the "apple is jesus" people have heart attacks.

    WHY DIDN'T APPLE DO ITS HOMEWORK?

    If you are competing for smart phone users, you could at least make a calendar that somewhat matches the competition in features (or hell, matches your OWN program iCal in features.)

    Apple did do it's homework. They created a device everyone wants, and literally changed the game in the cell phone industry. They made a phone, the most wanted device among the public. To me, thats doing homemwork, creating a slick UI, touchscreen, multitouch etc.....

    Everyone has a right to gripe with any product they buy, but anyone buying any device or item should put a smidge of effort into finding what its about before investing thousands of dollars in something.

    Fact is there are numerous means to go about making the calendar app just as useful as any device, you just have to put some effort into making your device how you want it.

    Lets face it, this thread is all about stirring the pot, and of course people here are going to defend the iPhone, its an iPhone dedicted website. The OP likes his palm device, so be it. But he could make his calendar the great asset he desires. Or he can go back to a palm, and hang with zach morris and fred flinstone and use old phones together. lol, . Jokes aside, OP can make his calendar useful, it just appears he'd rather complain than make effort. To me the iPhone had many short comings upon purchase, but I figured out how to make it work with me and for me.

    Interesting thread, good luck to OP and finding what he wants.
    07-14-2009 12:30 PM
  12. lionheartednyhc's Avatar
    Apple did do it's homework. They created a device everyone wants, and literally changed the game in the cell phone industry. They made a phone, the most wanted device among the public. To me, thats doing homemwork, creating a slick UI, touchscreen, multitouch etc.....

    Everyone has a right to gripe with any product they buy, but anyone buying any device or item should put a smidge of effort into finding what its about before investing thousands of dollars in something.

    Fact is there are numerous means to go about making the calendar app just as useful as any device, you just have to put some effort into making your device how you want it.

    Lets face it, this thread is all about stirring the pot, and of course people here are going to defend the iPhone, its an iPhone dedicted website. The OP likes his palm device, so be it. But he could make his calendar the great asset he desires. Or he can go back to a palm, and hang with zach morris and fred flinstone and use old phones together. lol, . Jokes aside, OP can make his calendar useful, it just appears he'd rather complain than make effort. To me the iPhone had many short comings upon purchase, but I figured out how to make it work with me and for me.

    Interesting thread, good luck to OP and finding what he wants.

    True, but one of the problems with the iphone is just that. They focus on Fun, rather than Functionality to show off the slick user interface. Take the calendar app, for instance. It sure is 10 times funner to flick the start date wheel and watch the days whiz by. And the Do the same for the hour wheel. And the same for the minute wheel. And the same for the OTHER end date wheel and the... you get the picture. But is it functional? Not in the least.

    And it is clear apple didn't do its homework since they keep adding basic functionality. Hell, the whole JB community is a testament to this.

    But really, this thread would not even be an issue if not for one simple fact. Unlike with every other thing Apple overlooked in putting in its phone, there is no app (JB or official) that can make up for it since apple made it impossible for any app, but ical, to use the alert functions in the iphone.



    And don't get me wrong, I love my iphone. But I also love constructive criticism and hate the apple can do no wrong mentality.
    Last edited by lionheartednyhc; 07-14-2009 at 01:15 PM.
    07-14-2009 01:11 PM
  13. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    No, Apple focuses on both. Can you use the Calendar for basic calendaring functions? Yes. Can you set up a Microsoft Exchange account? Yes. Web browsing? Yes. Chatting? Yes.

    Just because there's an app better than the Calendar built in with the iPhone, doesn't mean Apple doesn't focus on one or the other.
    07-14-2009 02:13 PM
  14. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    Well, the calendar app is good enough for me. I also use the Google Calendar synch, which is great.

    Plus, I chose to find the good capabilities of the iPhone, instead of constantly saying that it can't do MMS and tethering.
    I just bought Calengoo a few hours ago. Doesn't really seem to do more than the Calendar app inside the iPhone. Plus, it's slower than molasses. In winter.
    07-14-2009 02:17 PM
  15. alex6speed's Avatar
    I will certainly not say that Apple can do no wrong, as much as I cannot say the iPhone was targeted for productivity in a "travelling businessman" sense. If that were the case, and I was still to stay with AT&T, I would have waited for the Blackberry Onyx.
    07-15-2009 12:35 AM
  16. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    So why do people believe that the Blackberry is for business use but the iPhone is not? I keep hearing this over and over again, sounds like a broken record.

    I can't think of anything that the Blackberry can do that the iPhone can not do. Help me out here.
    07-15-2009 06:19 AM
  17. li2327's Avatar
    I guess when it comes to email, blackberry gives you more options such as document attachment etc. I use mine for strictly personal use so it works just fine for me.
    07-15-2009 07:47 AM
  18. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    You can attach docs on the iPhone. I just don't get why people continue to say that the iPhone is not for business use. The only drawback is that you can only have one Exchange account, but how many Exchange accounts do people have on the Blackberry phones at one time?
    07-15-2009 08:20 AM
  19. minimo3's Avatar
    I carry a BB Curve for business and the iPhone for personal use so here's just a few reasons off the top of my head:

    End user features:
    - iPhone currently only supports Microsoft Exchange. It misses the other 40% of the market who use Lotus Notes or Groupwise. (Although Domino 8.5.1 is slated to provide Exchange ActiveSync support)
    - no support in iPhone for corporate instant messaging solutions like Sametime or Office Communications Server
    - Battery lasts longer on the BB. If I go on a overnight trip I don't have to bring a charger, the battery easily lasts 2 days even with heavy usage. I can bring along a 2nd battery if I need to - no hunting for power sockets at an airport!
    - Extra loud speakerphone that doubles as a makeshift polycom for all your colleagues when stuck at a remote customer location
    - Profiles that let you totally silence the phone quickly so it doesn't distract you while you're up there giving a presentation. Vibrating pants are not cool :-)
    - LED light to let you know you have mail even if its on total silent mode
    - Camera-less versions available for folks who work in high security locations
    - Reasonable international data roaming plans e.g. $64.99 for unlimited international BB data on AT&T
    - BB devices available on multiple carriers and networks for maximum coverage. AT&T has serious network congestion issues in some locales e.g. NYC and parts of southern California
    - Bluetooth voice dialing, very handy when you're driving from the airport to the hotel in strange city and trying to make calls while negotiating rush hour traffic
    - Telenav for driving directions in unfamiliar places
    - Ability to open files in ZIP attachments
    - BB Messenger. Instant and always-on. Like SMS text messaging without the per message charges

    IT Admin features:
    - One single place to manage everything, the BES server. With iPhone you'd use Exchange for policy management, IIS for logging, Apple policy config tool for device management
    - Unable to forcibly push policies on the iPhone. Users have to manually click on a email attachment or run the policy to add it to their phones. Also unable to update policies OTA
    - Very fine grained security control for Blackberry (you can enable/disable almost every feature in the device). iPhone supports very limited Exchange ActiveSync policies e.g. remote wipe, and disable camera (only with Exchange 2007)
    - Admins can prevent users from installing apps on a BB
    - No good reporting and logging tool for iPhones
    Last edited by minimo3; 07-15-2009 at 09:13 AM.
    07-15-2009 09:09 AM
  20. minimo3's Avatar
    Some other reasons came to mind after I typed that out:

    - Unable to set out of office notification on iPhone. Half the time I forget to set it when I'm at the office and only remember it at the airport. Blackberry lets you do this.
    - Limited VPN support on the iPhone. For the popular IPSec protocol only Cisco is supported. My company had to specially buy a Cisco VPN to run a pilot test.
    - Blackberry lets you search emails on the server mailbox that have not been downloaded to the device. I'm not sure iPhone does this (someone will have to verify). This is very useful when pulling up old emails for reference
    07-15-2009 09:46 AM
  21. Alli's Avatar
    Your 3rd point is a mind set. You are used to RIM server which is its own mail protocol. If you use an IMAP email client, there is no downloading of email messages - they are simply always in sync with every client you use. So yes, you can search all email at all times.
    07-15-2009 10:29 AM
  22. ctt1wbw's Avatar
    Some of those reasons, like the LED light and the silenced options, those are reaching. An LED light is for business use? The iPhone uses tags and stuff like that to tell you when you have mail.

    And that little knob on the side mutes the phone. You realize that right?

    And preventing users from using their phone is not a very good answer either. Just don't give someone the password to install apps, or only let them install free ones. Just because someone who has a business iPhone downloads Facebook doesn't mean that viruses are going to get into the corporate mainframe.
    07-15-2009 10:39 AM
  23. minimo3's Avatar
    Your 3rd point is a mind set. You are used to RIM server which is its own mail protocol. If you use an IMAP email client, there is no downloading of email messages - they are simply always in sync with every client you use. So yes, you can search all email at all times.
    Maybe I'm missing something here, but on my iPhone I can only sync (with IMAP) up to 200 of the most recent emails (under settings). Let's say you have an mailbox of about 700MB with thousands emails stretching back 5 years. Now try to search for an email (using keyword search) that was sent/received in say 2007. When I try to do that in Spotlight it comes up blank. It only indexes the 200 emails that are synced locally on my device. With the Blackberry it will perform a search search on the server and search all those thousands of emails.

    There is a similar limitation in calendar. Try searching for an event that occurred more than a year ago. It won't find it even if it is sync'ed locally. The spotlight indexer skips items older than 1 year, I guess it minimize the size of the index.
    07-15-2009 10:44 AM
  24. big9erfan's Avatar
    BB has the full business aspect down, I won't argue that at all, but how long has it taken for them to implement all of that? I know BB has been around for a long time now and Apple is just on their 3rd year of the iPhone. I'd be surprised were more of those issues to not be addressed in the future.

    One of the big points you bring up is the cameraless version for those that work in high security locations. A number of my friends had to get dumb phones just for this reason.
    07-15-2009 10:45 AM
  25. Alli's Avatar
    Got ya now. I hadn't realized that limitation.

    Maybe I'm missing something here, but on my iPhone I can only sync (with IMAP) up to 200 of the most recent emails (under settings). Let's say you have an mailbox of about 700MB with thousands emails stretching back 5 years. Now try to search for an email (using keyword search) that was sent/received in say 2007. When I try to do that in Spotlight it comes up blank. It only indexes the 200 emails that are synced locally on my device. With the Blackberry it will perform a search search on the server and search all those thousands of emails.

    There is a similar limitation in calendar. Try searching for an event that occurred more than a year ago. It won't find it even if it is sync'ed locally. The spotlight indexer skips items older than 1 year, I guess it minimize the size of the index.
    07-15-2009 10:57 AM
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