1. tirk's Avatar
    Pic of SIM removal:

    Ah, thanks.
    06-29-2007 06:25 AM
  2. llarson's Avatar
    You attacked me and my poor Vols football team... I demand an apology.
    Sorry!
    06-29-2007 08:51 AM
  3. llarson's Avatar
    So you think people are going to carry their expensive iPhones everywhere? In some places, it really would be best to switch SIMs, unless you'll be staying in clean, safe urban areas most of the time. But that's not always the case for some.

    How about these examples:

    1. This isn't good work phone for blue collar workers(and yes some CAN afford an iPhone, some make decent money), since they are doing physical stuff a lot. But if they can switch SIMs, they can use the iPhone on their off hours if they want. You can see why blue collar workers use clunky Moto Nextels most of the time on the job, you drop those and they're still good to go! Drop an iPhone, start crying!

    2. And even if you're a white collar worker, suppose you're required to use a PDA on the job but still want to use the iPhone after hours? No SIM switching sucks.

    3. I suspect some parents will spoil their kids and send them to school with an iPhone, but that is such a BAD idea. If you do get your kid an iPhone, you really should have them switch to a cheaper phone for school to prevent theft and they can use the iPhone after school. I know it's not cool, but iPods get stolen at school a lot so what's going to happen when iPhones show up?

    4. What if you do end up having to go to less than comfortable areas, of whatever type? You need a phone but the iPhone could get easily damaged, stolen, confiscated or whatever. Time to switch SIMs. Unable to do so, then you'll have to leave the iPhone home or risk losing it.

    Just some of the reasons people would NEED to switch SIMs.
    I just don't think 80% of those who own GSM phones in the states switch SIMs for any other reason then when they buy a NEW phone and that is done in the store.

    I might be wrong but but the people on this board represent the top 10% of those who own phones so I think we see things differently then "John and Jane Q Customer".

    Those that have spent an hour in an AT&T or T-Mobil store tell me do you think most of the people you saw in the store will switch their SIMs betwen phones on a regular basis?

    Also, when I was at the AT&T store asking about the iPHONE most of the techs are upset that Apple and AT&T have not told them anything about the iPHONE I guess Friday between 4:00 and 6:00 they get to open the super secret file and learn about the workings of the iPHONE.

    They did confirm that SIMs from other phones WILL NOT WORK IN THE iPHONE. There will be a $15 program to transfer info from your old SIM to the new one. They had no clue if the iPHONE SIM would be able to work in any other phone.
    06-29-2007 09:03 AM
  4. bruckwine's Avatar
    They did confirm that SIMs from other phones WILL NOT WORK IN THE iPHONE. There will be a $15 program to transfer info from your old SIM to the new one. They had no clue if the iPHONE SIM would be able to work in any other phone.
    I have faith in my fellow techies..someone WILL unlock it and then I can use it back here in the Caribbean
    06-29-2007 09:07 AM
  5. surur's Avatar
    In Europe its not just techies which swap SIM's, its also normal people with more than one cellphone number who want to save on call costs. Remember than in Europe cellphone penetration is > 105%, meaning many people have more than one handset or contract. That is why dual sim phones are increasingly in demand.

    Here's an old article:
    In countries like Italy, Sweden and the UK, growth in penetration has shown no signs of abating, with penetration rising from 93%, 93% and 89%, respectively, in 2003 to 104%, 103% and 101% in 2004.

    Although some people might think that the rise is fuelled by drug dealers toting multiple phones for ‘business’, the increase is actually explained by customers buying multiple phones and/or SIM cards
    http://digital-lifestyles.info/2005/...-2007-analysis

    In USA the penetration is only around 70%. In UK penetration at present is at least 116%, and 27% of people have 2 phones. In Luxembourg is 164%

    Surur
    06-29-2007 09:19 AM
  6. whmurray's Avatar
    That may be the "rule of thumb" for a savvy consumer, but it's not the MO of a true geek. A *true* geek is an early adopter, usually overpaying and acting as a beta tester for the "privilege."
    Geeks are not the iPhone market. Heat-seekers, not Geeks, buy iPhones.
    06-29-2007 09:25 AM
  7. italiangspot's Avatar
    people on line outside apple in NYC... i hope this phone runs smoothly for them, lol
    phone isnt being released till 6pm
    06-29-2007 09:34 AM
  8. whmurray's Avatar
    Face it guys, it is all about the money.

    If money were no object, everyone would want one. Imagine the length of the lines if the price were not this high.

    Apple is the most savvy of pricing strategists. Apple products sell on the street at list, or even slightly above. Yes, they will add features and capacity and lower the prices over time. They will do it at just the right rate to keep sales and margins high.

    Yes, there will be a 3G version when AT&T finally builds out their 3G network. Heat-seekers will buy a 2G version and then buy a 3G version when it is available. And yes, they will buy out their old 2 year agreement and sign a new one. (For the GSM user, there is no place to go anyway.) For the real heat-seeker, money is no object.

    Since I cannot use my old number or my old SIM, and since I do not plan to give up my 650, I expect that the life total cost of ownership of the iPhone is about $3000-. However, I just reminded myself that I have made thousands of dollars in Apple stock in this year alone. I can pay and pay and pay.

    The iPhone is free!
    06-29-2007 09:41 AM
  9. Pearl_Diva's Avatar
    I thought you could use your old number. Just buy an iPhone data plan.

    http://www.apple.com/iphone/easysetup/rateplans.html
    06-29-2007 09:47 AM
  10. llarson's Avatar
    In Europe its not just techies which swap SIM's, its also normal people with more than one cellphone number who want to save on call costs. Remember than in Europe cellphone penetration is > 105%, meaning many people have more than one handset or contract. That is why dual sim phones are increasingly in demand.

    Surur
    where the iPHONE is being released what do you think the percentage of people who swap SIMs is?
    06-29-2007 09:52 AM
  11. oalvarez's Avatar
    correct. not to be argumentative, but, if you ask those around you (friends, family) i'd think that many of the responses would be "what's a sim card?"

    maybe i am completely wrong and that's ok too.
    06-29-2007 10:02 AM
  12. surur's Avatar
    where the iPHONE is being released what do you think the percentage of people who swap SIMs is?
    You mean its not coming to Europe? Anyway, we already know that you can swap sims in the iphone. The question was if normal people do this, and the answer is that in Europe they do. In Asia also.

    Surur
    06-29-2007 10:06 AM
  13. Pearl_Diva's Avatar
    Only people strictly on CDMA would ask that. "What's a SIM card?"
    06-29-2007 10:08 AM
  14. stroths's Avatar
    @The Phone Diva

    You give the general population too much credit. While we know what they are, we aren't the norm.
    06-29-2007 10:51 AM
  15. mikec#IM's Avatar
    snip
    06-29-2007 11:28 AM
  16. mikec#IM's Avatar
    snip
    06-29-2007 11:30 AM
  17. RICHINMJ's Avatar
    Face it guys, it is all about the money.

    If money were no object, everyone would want one. Imagine the length of the lines if the price were not this high.

    Apple is the most savvy of pricing strategists. Apple products sell on the street at list, or even slightly above. Yes, they will add features and capacity and lower the prices over time. They will do it at just the right rate to keep sales and margins high.

    Yes, there will be a 3G version when AT&T finally builds out their 3G network. Heat-seekers will buy a 2G version and then buy a 3G version when it is available. And yes, they will buy out their old 2 year agreement and sign a new one. (For the GSM user, there is no place to go anyway.) For the real heat-seeker, money is no object.

    Since I cannot use my old number or my old SIM, and since I do not plan to give up my 650, I expect that the life total cost of ownership of the iPhone is about $3000-. However, I just reminded myself that I have made thousands of dollars in Apple stock in this year alone. I can pay and pay and pay.

    The iPhone is free!
    Its not about the money at all for me. I have made over 20g in Apple stock and still don't want one. I like my TREO, the slingbox, the games, the e-mail, financial packages, standard palm applications, 8g interchangeable memory cards. If someone were to give me an iPhone, I still wouldn't get it set up. I haven't yet figured out in my inner self if it is a problem with Apple or AT&T.
    06-29-2007 11:43 AM
  18. whmurray's Avatar
    I thought you could use your old number. Just buy an iPhone data plan.

    http://www.apple.com/iphone/easysetup/rateplans.html
    You can "port" your old number but you must get a new SIM. Not clear whether that SIM will work in a Treo. Since I never give out my cellular number, only forward my land line to it, I would not care much if I could use the new SIM in my Treo.
    06-29-2007 01:10 PM
  19. llarson's Avatar
    I understand AT&T WILL NOT OFFER INSURANCE ON THE iPHONE.

    Anyone have outside providers?

    I also see we are no longer part of TreoCentral?
    06-29-2007 01:53 PM
  20. dstrauss#IM's Avatar
    ...I also see we are no longer part of TreoCentral?
    Seems likebig competitors for Palm (WM first, now Apple) get their numbers ported to a separate site. At least no fee or SIM change necessary.
    06-29-2007 02:01 PM
  21. taroliw's Avatar
    I'm not sure it's the most unexpected of news to be honest. I seem to recall that removable and interchangeable SIMs is a long-standing part of the GSM standard. Can anyone confirm?
    You are correct. The surprise had been the suggestion that the iPhone wasn't supposedly going to allow people to remove the SIM. That was apparently an error.
    06-29-2007 02:03 PM
  22. CountBuggula's Avatar
    Face it guys, it is all about the money.

    If money were no object, everyone would want one. Imagine the length of the lines if the price were not this high.

    Apple is the most savvy of pricing strategists. Apple products sell on the street at list, or even slightly above. Yes, they will add features and capacity and lower the prices over time. They will do it at just the right rate to keep sales and margins high.

    Yes, there will be a 3G version when AT&T finally builds out their 3G network. Heat-seekers will buy a 2G version and then buy a 3G version when it is available. And yes, they will buy out their old 2 year agreement and sign a new one. (For the GSM user, there is no place to go anyway.) For the real heat-seeker, money is no object.

    Since I cannot use my old number or my old SIM, and since I do not plan to give up my 650, I expect that the life total cost of ownership of the iPhone is about $3000-. However, I just reminded myself that I have made thousands of dollars in Apple stock in this year alone. I can pay and pay and pay.

    The iPhone is free!
    I also have to disagree. You could give me all the money in the world and I wouldn't buy one. You could hand me a free iPhone and I might play with it for a few minutes before setting it down and never touching it again. I certainly wouldn't ever make it my main cell phone.

    I don't care how pretty it is, I refuse to use a device that's that restrictive. Especially after using an open platform, it's just impossible to go back.
    06-29-2007 02:04 PM
  23. taroliw's Avatar
    OK, I think I have the answer from the horse's mouth, which is better than hearsay. Looks like all you need to do is get an iPhone data plan and you can use the phone if you already have a contract.

    http://www.apple.com/iphone/easysetup/rateplans.html

    So I guess you can move your existing SIM over after the phone is activated, since they claim you can pop open the SIM door with a pin.
    But doesn't activating the iPhone cause a rate plan (contract) to be associated with it's SIM? Seems to me you'd want to purchase the device and just pop a SIM in, after having the data services enabled on that account.
    06-29-2007 02:05 PM
  24. bruckwine's Avatar
    correct. not to be argumentative, but, if you ask those around you (friends, family) i'd think that many of the responses would be "what's a sim card?"

    maybe i am completely wrong and that's ok too.
    OMG I think it's really the US seriously. For example here in the caribbeean even a 8 yr old knows what the SIM card is...kids here have cellphones from age 10 upwards andd it's all GSM (CDMA is inthe US only isn't it). So i guess you'e right for the US , but outside of you guys everyone will know what a SIm is and how to swap it...I would say only the elderly (over 70) here don't know - they just take the phone ffrom their children and sue it.
    06-29-2007 03:04 PM
199 ... 678
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD