1. LiveFaith's Avatar


    http://nypost.com/seven/06262007/new..._fleishman.htm

    NYPost Editor is highly underwhelmed by this very expensive phone. He says don't buy it. I'm sure Apple will be rushing him iPhone 2.0 test units for another pre-release smackdown. :evil:

    Here's some quotes ...
    "TENS of thousands of people are expected to line up this Friday for the most hyped gadget of the decade - the iPhone.
    Don't be one of them."

    "Tech geeks and some business travelers will wait in line Friday (or pay someone else). You should wait for the next version."


    Obviously NOTHING could match the hype this thing has received. That being said, his review was what I expected would occur. The iPhone is high on flair, but not robust enough in "smartphone" maturity to really be a true competitor to biz oriented Treos, HTCs, and BBs.

    I expect that this will be an "iPod Phone" more than it will be an iPhone. Apple is not really head to head here with Nokia e61s, HTCs, BB8830s, or Treo 755s. They are bringing in a new segment that is more like a musclebound "Chocolate" phone. Future Treos could certainly benefit from much of the tech. Can you say HVGA? I and many others have for 4 years now! How bout WiFi? Nuff said.

    Anyway, the iPhone will have a certain impact on the traditional smartphone segment, but it's apples and oranges folks. Any power user who dumps their Treo 680 for this $600 beast will probably be back pretty quick, unless they are primarily multimedia users.

    For all the slamming we've been giving Palm over the lack of innovation and specs, they have actually done a pretty good job of building a smartfone that is robust in a lot of ways. That takes a lot of time, learning, and resources. Collagen caught a lot of heat for his "Apple's not just gonna walk in" comment. In light of Palm's international carrier agreements, and robust business apps etc, I would say he was pretty close to right.
    06-26-2007 06:36 PM
  2. sxtg's Avatar
    No surprise. It will do whatever it does extremely well, but it wont do as much.
    06-26-2007 06:45 PM
  3. oalvarez's Avatar
    i don't think it's supposed to.
    06-26-2007 07:05 PM
  4. bruckwine's Avatar
    Not surpising though the review seems a tad bit negative/biased...as to the viewer part I think he may be right...it will work good for occasional viewing, but full webpages that are readable on a 17-21" screen will require a lot of multitouch to see in entirety... I hope safari has adblock as that may be the best way to surf the "real internet" - it will still sell though. As I've said b4 I'm waiting for iPhone 3.0 (with sufficient improvements) myself!
    06-26-2007 07:11 PM
  5. surur's Avatar
    Walt Mossberg's review - the good bits removed to save you reading time. :evil:

    Now, Apple Inc., whose digital products are hailed for their design and innovation, is jumping into this smart phone market with the iPhone, which goes on sale in a few days after months of the most frenzied hype and speculation we have ever seen for a single technology product. Even though the phone’s minimum price is a hefty $499, people are already lining up outside Apple stores to be among the first to snag one when they go on sale Friday evening.

    But the iPhone has a major drawback: the cellphone network it uses. It only works with AT&T (formerly Cingular), won’t come in models that use Verizon or Sprint and can’t use the digital cards (called SIM cards) that would allow it to run on T-Mobile’s network. So, the phone can be a poor choice unless you are in areas where AT&T’s coverage is good. It does work overseas, but only via an AT&T roaming plan.

    In addition, even when you have great AT&T coverage, the iPhone can’t run on AT&T’s fastest cellular data network. Instead, it uses a pokey network called EDGE, which is far slower than the fastest networks from Verizon or Sprint that power many other smart phones. And the initial iPhone model cannot be upgraded to use the faster networks.

    But this Wi-Fi capability doesn’t fully make up for the lack of a fast cellular data capability, because it is impractical to keep joining and dropping short-range Wi-Fi networks while taking a long walk, or riding in a cab through a city.

    Hardware:
    There’s no physical keyboard, just a single button that takes you to the home screen. The phone is about as long as the Treo 700, the BlackBerry 8800 or the BlackJack, but it’s slightly wider than the BlackJack or Treo, and heavier than the BlackBerry and BlackJack.

    The display is made of a sturdy glass, not plastic, and while it did pick up smudges.

    One downside: Some accessories for iPods may not work properly on the iPhone. The headphone jack, which supports both stereo music and phone calls, is deeply recessed, so you may need an adapter for existing headphones. And, while the iPhone uses the standard iPod port on the bottom edge, it doesn’t recognize all car adapters for playing music, only for charging.

    Touch-screen interface: To go through long lists of emails, contacts, or songs, you just “flick” with your finger. To select items, you tap. To enlarge photos, you “pinch” them by placing two fingers on their corners and dragging them in or out. To zoom in on portions of Web pages, you double-tap with your fingers. You cannot use a stylus for any of this.

    But there’s no overall search on the iPhone (except Web searching), and no quick way to move to the top or bottom of pages (except in the Web browser). The only aid is an alphabetical scale on the right in tiny type.

    There’s also no way to cut, copy, or paste text.

    And the lack of dedicated hardware buttons for functions like phone, email and contacts means extra taps are needed to start using features. Also, if you are playing music while doing something else, the lack of hardware playback buttons forces you to return to the iPod program to stop the music or change a song.

    Keyboard: The virtual keys are large and get larger as you touch them. Software tries to guess what you’re typing, and fix errors. Overall, it works. But the error-correction system didn’t seem as clever as the one on the BlackBerry, and you have to switch to a different keyboard view to insert a period or comma, which is annoying.

    Email: It can also handle corporate email using Microsoft’s Exchange system, if your IT department cooperates by enabling a setting on the server.

    BlackBerry email services can’t be used on an iPhone

    It can also receive and open Microsoft Word and Excel documents and Adobe PDF files. But it doesn’t allow you to edit or save these files.

    Memory: The $499 base model comes with four gigabytes of memory, and the $599 model has eight gigabytes. That’s far more than on any other smart phone, but much less than on full-size iPods. Also, there’s no slot for memory-expansion cards.

    Battery life: Like the iPod, but unlike most cellphones, the iPhone lacks a removable battery. So you can’t carry a spare. in our two-week test, the iPhone generally lasted all day with a typical mix of tasks.

    Phone calls: The phone interface is clean and simple, but takes more taps to reach than on many other smart phones, because there are no dedicated hardware phone buttons. You also cannot just start typing a name or number, but must scroll through a list of favorites, through your recent call list, or your entire contact list. You can also use a virtual keypad.

    Voice call quality was good, but not great. In some places, especially in weak coverage areas, there was some muffling or garbling.

    A downside—there’s no easy way to transfer phone numbers, via AT&T, directly from an existing phone. The iPhone is meant to sync with an address book (and calendar) on a PC.

    Contacts and calendars: These are pretty straightforward and work well. The calendar lacks a week view, though a list view helps fill that gap. Contacts can be gathered into groups, but the groups can’t be used as email distribution lists.

    Other features: There are widgets, or small programs, for accessing weather, stock prices and Google Maps, which includes route directions, but no real-time navigation.

    The only add-on software Apple is allowing will be Web-based programs that must be accessed through the on-board Web browser. The company says these can be made to look just like built-in programs, but the few we tried weren’t impressive.

    Missing features: The iPhone is missing some features common on some competitors. There’s no instant messaging, only standard text messaging. While its two megapixel camera took excellent pictures in our tests, it can’t record video. Its otherwise excellent Web browser can’t fully utilize some Web sites, because it doesn’t yet support Adobe’s Flash technology. Although the phone contains a complete iPod, you can’t use your songs as ringtones. There aren’t any games, nor is there any way to directly access Apple’s iTunes Music Store.

    Expectations for the iPhone have been so high that it can’t possibly meet them all. It isn’t for the average person who just wants a cheap, small phone for calling and texting.
    http://solution.allthingsd.com/?p=12...tion=printable

    Surur
    06-26-2007 07:17 PM
  6. samkim's Avatar
    Walt Mossberg's review - the good bits removed to save you reading time. :evil:


    http://solution.allthingsd.com/?p=12...tion=printable

    Surur
    Come on, Surur. You removed the most significant paragraph:
    The iPhone’s most controversial feature, the omission of a physical keyboard in favor of a virtual keyboard on the screen, turned out in our tests to be a nonissue, despite our deep initial skepticism. After five days of use, Walt — who did most of the testing for this review — was able to type on it as quickly and accurately as he could on the Palm Treo he has used for years. This was partly because of smart software that corrects typing errors on the fly.
    06-26-2007 07:26 PM
  7. surur's Avatar
    Come on, Surur. You removed the most significant paragraph:
    Wasn't that the point?

    Surur
    06-26-2007 07:31 PM
  8. oalvarez's Avatar
    here's some of what was ommitted:

    We have been testing the iPhone for two weeks, in multiple usage scenarios, in cities across the country. Our verdict is that, despite some flaws and feature omissions, the iPhone is, on balance, a beautiful and breakthrough handheld computer. Its software, especially, sets a new bar for the smart-phone industry, and its clever finger-touch interface, which dispenses with a stylus and most buttons, works well, though it sometimes adds steps to common functions.

    The Apple phone combines intelligent voice calling, and a full-blown iPod, with a beautiful new interface for music and video playback. It offers the best Web browser we have seen on a smart phone, and robust email software. And it synchronizes easily and well with both Windows and Macintosh computers using Apples iTunes software.

    It has the largest and highest-resolution screen of any smart phone weve seen, and the most internal memory by far. Yet it is one of the thinnest smart phones available and offers impressive battery life, better than its key competitors claim.

    It feels solid and comfortable in the hand and the way it displays photos, videos and Web pages on its gorgeous screen makes other smart phones look primitive.

    The iPhones most controversial feature, the omission of a physical keyboard in favor of a virtual keyboard on the screen, turned out in our tests to be a nonissue, despite our deep initial skepticism. After five days of use, Walt who did most of the testing for this review was able to type on it as quickly and accurately as he could on the Palm Treo he has used for years. This was partly because of smart software that corrects typing errors on the fly.

    The iPhone compensates by being one of the few smart phones that can also use Wi-Fi wireless networks. When you have access to Wi-Fi, the iPhone flies on the Web. Not only that, but the iPhone automatically switches from EDGE to known Wi-Fi networks when it finds them, and pops up a list of new Wi-Fi networks it encounters as you move. Walt was able to log onto paid Wi-Fi networks at Starbucks and airports, and even used a free Wi-Fi network at Fenway Park in Boston to email pictures taken during a Red Sox game.

    One great phone feature is called visual voice mail. It shows you the names or at least the phone numbers of people who have left you voicemail, so you can quickly listen to those you want. Its also very easy to turn the speakerphone on and off, or to establish conference calls.

    iPod: The built-in iPod handles music and video perfectly, and has all the features of a regular iPod. But the interface is entirely new. The famed scroll wheel is gone, and instead finger taps and flicking move you through your collection and virtual controls appear on the screen. Theres also a version of the cover flow interface which allows you to select music by flipping through album covers.
    06-26-2007 07:32 PM
  9. mikec#IM's Avatar
    Come on, Surur. You removed the most significant paragraph:
    Well if Walt said so, it must be true...
    06-26-2007 07:34 PM
  10. samkim's Avatar
    Well if Walt said so, it must be true...
    It's a review.
    06-26-2007 07:36 PM
  11. oalvarez's Avatar
    WIRELESS
    IPhone sets new bar
    WSJ columnist Walt Mossberg calls Apple's new phone a beautiful and "breakthrough" handheld computer that has some flaws.
    Read Mossberg's review of Apple iPhone

    what is it that Palm doesn't understand?
    06-26-2007 07:38 PM
  12. bruckwine's Avatar
    May I be devils advocate? All the reviews that will be out before June 29th will obviously be from those whom Apple picked to give them the more favourable reviews in advance (and thus propel the hype)....a better, more balanced review would probably be out next week (or month) from somewhere like pcworld or such. On the other hand the predictions of others might be as biased in not giving vredit where it is due esp w/o an iPhone of their own to test. Hence taking it all with a grain of salt until you can do-it-yourself.
    06-26-2007 07:41 PM
  13. surur's Avatar
    So, in short, it does some of what other smartphones can do beautifully, and may do the web even better, but lacks basics such as the ability to use other sim cards overseas, it cant record video, you cant save attachments, its only 2G, some features are cumbersome and slow to access, and you will have to wait for Apple to fix them, as there's no third party solution available. Rumours (by Archie) of a software upgradeable 3G radio were false, and it wont necessarily work with your Ipod accessories.

    There was also no mention made of Zirconia.

    Surur
    06-26-2007 07:43 PM
  14. bruckwine's Avatar
    David Pogue's over at NYT is a bit more balanced I feel if still leaning towards it:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/27/te...l?pagewanted=2
    06-26-2007 07:59 PM
  15. surur's Avatar
    But otherwise, you have to use AT&T’s ancient EDGE cellular network, which is excruciatingly slow. The New York Times’s home page takes 55 seconds to appear; Amazon.com, 100 seconds; Yahoo, two minutes. You almost ache for a dial-up modem.
    Wow!

    Surur
    06-26-2007 08:05 PM
  16. Malatesta's Avatar
    Well, guess I was right about the browser speeds over Edge, via Pogue:

    The New York Times’s home page takes 55 seconds to appear; Amazon.com, 100 seconds; Yahoo, two minutes.
    Damn, Surur beat me!

    That's a long time and you haven't even clicked a link yet to go further into the site. No surprise though.
    06-26-2007 08:08 PM
  17. surur's Avatar
    Well, guess I was right about the browser speeds over Edge, via Pogue:

    That's a long time and you haven't even clicked a link yet to go further into the site. No surprise though.
    Its scary actually, and the reason why we have mobile friendly sites in the first place. Apple's strategy is like an underwater bicycle - slow and unnecessary.

    I like 2 quotes from MacRumors:

    Well I guess people will have to turn off the images when browsing on Edge and find a wifi hotspot to use the device to it's full.
    and

    Well, if the iPhone is able to multitask like it looks like it can, then EDGE won't be TOO bad. Just start loading a webpage, hit the 'home' button, and then go do something else for a while.
    This from a phone 5 years ahead of everyone else? Load a web page and go make a cup of tea?

    Surur
    06-26-2007 08:26 PM
  18. surur's Avatar
    It gets better:
    - No voice recognition or voice dialing
    Surur
    06-26-2007 08:28 PM
  19. Malatesta's Avatar
    Some things are baffling like:

    - no voice dial
    - no 3g/mobile browsing option
    - no GPS
    - no search contacts/smarter way to dial
    - no IM/MMS/Video/Zoom (even digital?)/Flash
    - no mp3 or iTunes ringtones
    - no select/copy/paste
    - no doc editing

    But, OTOH, I can bet that they have some large upgrades coming along in the next few months that will add or improve those functions--afterall, besides the 3g/GPS factor, all else could be implemented and I bet they will. Google is obviously getting very cozy with Apple and the iPhone.

    The dialing thing is weird as it was Job's contention that everyone uses the "recently called list" to dial and "how dumb". Yet, the iPhone doesn't seem to really address this with just as many steps, if not more, to dial a number. That is a bit confusing as surely they could have come up with something more elegant?
    06-26-2007 08:37 PM
  20. surur's Avatar
    The elegance is in the swishing UI elements, not the efficiency of the interface. Its style over substance.

    Surur
    06-26-2007 08:40 PM
  21. volwrath's Avatar
    Some things are baffling like:

    - no voice dial
    - no 3g/mobile browsing option
    - no GPS
    - no search contacts/smarter way to dial
    - no IM/MMS/Video/Zoom (even digital?)/Flash
    - no mp3 or iTunes ringtones
    - no select/copy/paste
    - no doc editing
    Dont forget no SIM Card
    No External Apps
    No Expansion slot
    06-26-2007 08:48 PM
  22. MacUser's Avatar
    But, OTOH, I can bet that they have some large upgrades coming along in the next few months that will add or improve those functions--afterall, besides the 3g/GPS factor, all else could be implemented and I bet they will. Google is obviously getting very cozy with Apple and the iPhone.
    That would be a "smart" bet.
    06-26-2007 08:49 PM
  23. mikec#IM's Avatar
    Well, guess I was right about the browser speeds over Edge, via Pogue:



    Damn, Surur beat me!

    That's a long time and you haven't even clicked a link yet to go further into the site. No surprise though.
    That lovely EDGE...it's turd-er-rific!

    The iPhone is sweet - if you never leave your house/wi-fi spot.
    06-26-2007 09:58 PM
  24. RICHINMJ's Avatar
    Its all about marketing. Steve Jobs will tell you Iphone has "the Edge" and we will all be happy. :stick:
    06-26-2007 10:04 PM
  25. Malatesta's Avatar
    No A2DP support either. Dang...
    06-26-2007 10:22 PM
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