1. archie's Avatar
    Show me a dumb phone without at least voice tags.

    Surur
    fantastic point.
    iPods have incorporated voice tags for the last 2 years. A person would be stupid to think that they will suddenly stop supporting this. Especially now with the ever increasing interoperatability (not sure if that is a word) of iPods and vehicles. AND NOW with Bluetooth built into the iPhone, it should prove to be of even more use.

    I can't wait for Apple to reveal there full hand in regards to the iPhone. I can't wait for Apple to unveil Leopard and its iPhone level of support and interoperability (like maybe funtioning as a remote control to Apple TV). I can't wait for Apple to reveal the additional peripherals they have worked up for the iPhone. I can't wait to see the bevy of additional perpherals from third party manufacturers.
    01-27-2007 04:41 PM
  2. archie's Avatar
    What? No response from suror.

    The sky is falling, the sky is falling!


    OK, how 'bout this comment of yours:
    How about you backup your statement with some details other than "I heard".
    Because AJAX is very resource intensive. Doing it on a mobile processor with acceptable speed is also very hard. Its not something that will be helped by a graphics accelerator, but requires a heavy weight browser. And a full features browser with a full DOM is resource intensive.

    We shall see, but like most of Job's claims it will probably be bunk too.

    Surur
    Oh no, "I Fear, I am so Uncertain, I highly Doubt I will get the iPhone knowing what surur knows".

    BULL****!!
    02-01-2007 07:19 PM
  3. Slingbox's Avatar
    Things I hate about the iphone
    It,s over rated in no ones hand
    edge speeds are a killer:thumbsdn:

    Look forward to the palm sherlock to be released in June by Sprint.linux OS with that pretty (intel chip=wimax speeds-We all can prey)Moto and samsung are locked in on that intel chip but we may be suprised.
    02-01-2007 08:27 PM
  4. Pearl_Diva's Avatar
    So you have proof the Sherlock is coming? What're the details?
    02-01-2007 10:17 PM
  5. archie's Avatar
    Because AJAX is very resource intensive. Doing it on a mobile processor with acceptable speed is also very hard. Its not something that will be helped by a graphics accelerator, but requires a heavy weight browser. And a full features browser with a full DOM is resource intensive.

    We shall see, but like most of Job's claims it will probably be bunk too.

    Surur
    Hey, what do you know; look what I found:

    Article
    An iPhone Performance Secret: LLVM
    Thursday, February 1st, 2007 at 2:50 PM - by John Martellaro

    Apple has found a way to achieve amazing graphics speed in a shirt pocket device, the iPhone, by using a special form of code optimization called "Low Level Virtual Machine," (LLVM) according to graphics and algorithms specialist Charles Ying.

    Mr. Ying wrote Thursday that Apple has taken the approach of using its expertise in Mac OS X, OpenGL, and code optimization via LLVM in the development in the iPhone.

    Small personal electronics that can fit in your pocket are always short of the electrical power required for fast video processing. And yet Apple has demonstrated very impressive graphics capabilities with the iPhone. The key is extensive code optimization at every stage, from the CPU to the graphics system, from compile to runtime, and that can be done with LLVM.

    Because the iPhone is running "OS X," a variant of Mac OS X, Apple can take advantage of their expertise in OpenGL graphics used by Mac OS X to achieve the amazing scrolling feature and finger resizing of graphics of the iPhone. But any interpreted interface, like OpenGL would have to be highly optimized to achieve that kind of performance in a small device. With LLVM, the programmer can enable program optimization in every realm: compile, link, and even at runtime.

    Apple has taken several steps to achieve this. Apple has quietly contributed ARM enhancements to LLVM. Secondly, LLVM has been integrated with Apple's primary compiler in Xcode, called gcc.

    When all is said and done, Apple has achieved a highly optimized OS X and Open GL code base that can exploit Core Animation on an ARM processor.

    This is very likely why Apple chose to use "OS X" in the iPhone and how Apple can achieve amazing graphics in a shirt pocket device with limited electrical power.
    02-01-2007 11:54 PM
  6. Slingbox's Avatar
    So you have proof the Sherlock is coming? What're the details?
    Brighthand
    Is This Hawkins' Pet Project?

    Over the past year or so, Jeff Hawkins, Palm's co-founder, has made several references to his company's plans to create a mysterious third product category that's neither a handheld or smartphone.

    Not surprisingly, Engadget's article has created speculation that the Sherlock will be this device.

    Of course, it's also entirely possible that this device, if real, will simply be an updated version of one of Palm's current smartphones, especially as this information is supposedly coming from a wireless carrier.

    Only time can reveal more information on the Sherlock.

    Hints and Suggestions

    When asked for details on this mysterious product category during his interview last year with the Portland Business Journal, all Hawkins would say was:

    I always think of mobile computing as personal computing. This long-term vision has led us through everything -- first the organizers and now through the smart phone space. It's like everything a personal computer is. Continue down that path. What are the implications of a world where everyone has a super high-speed Internet connection in their pocket and many gigabytes of storage, super-fast processors, audio, visual and multimedia? What are the consequences of that? How will that change computing when you have all that stuff available to you all the time? I try to think into the future. That's how we come up with new products. So I'm not going to tell you what it is, but it's following the consequences of mobile computing.

    __________________________________________________ _______________

    Software Everyware-David Beers
    Sunday, January 28, 2007
    The rebirth of the Palm OS brand
    I wasn't surprised to see a few shrill articles about the death of the Palm OS this week. The ten-year-old mobile operating system has been "dying" for most of its life in the assessment of the technical media—at least dating back to when the first Pocket PC devices hit the market in 2000. But the original PDA OS still dominates the handheld device market and has in recent years occupied a small but high-profile beachhead on the global smartphone market, thanks to the popularity of the Palm Treo. Still, when its owner ACCESS announced it was renaming the venerable Palm OS Garnet to "Garnet OS" it seemed even to many fair-minded observers to have suffered a humiliating blow.

    At the risk of sounding absurdly optimistic in the face of the declining PDA market and the Palm OS's beleaguered status in the tough smartphone market, I am going on record saying that its renaming is actually something of a milestone in the rebirth of the "Palm" brand. To understand why this could be so you need to know a bit of history.

    To start with, while ACCESS has been decried for the renaming, it wasn't actually something they had a choice about. In May of 2005 PalmSource sold the right to the previously shared Palm brand to then-PalmOne, and agreed to phase out its use of the name in all its products within four years. PalmOne immediately changed its name back to Palm Inc. and it was only a matter of time before ACCESS—party to the agreement by dint of its acquisition of PalmSource—would begin the process of removing the Palm name from all of its products. When PalmSource was renamed ACCESS last October this was symbolic of the integration of parent and subsidiary, but it was also the first step toward compliance with that two-year old agreement. Changing "Palm OS Garnet" to "Garnet OS" is just the next step. Eventually ACCESS products like Palm Desktop will have to be renamed or replaced as well.

    What's more interesting is what the change means for Palm. As has been widely publicized, Palm reacquired from ACCESS the right to use and develop the Garnet OS source code in pretty much any way it choses as long as backward compatibility is maintained, as established by a mutually agreed upon test suite. Less publicized is the fact that Palm is actually exempt from having to use the name Garnet OS in any products it releases with this OS. In explaining this deal with Palm, ACCESS stated:

    Under terms of the agreement, we have given Palm the right to use either "Palm OS by ACCESS" or the product's new name... when referring to the operating system licensed with this new agreement.
    So from Palm's perspective this renaming exercise by ACCESS would appear to mean next to nothing.

    But appearances can be deceiving. As I've mentioned several times before, Palm's reacquistion of the Garnet source code was not just so Palm didn't have to depend on ACCESS to make minor tweaks and bug fixes. The $44M agreement included concessions by ACCESS that give Palm "the right to use Palm OS Garnet in whole, or in part, in any product from Palm and together with any other system technologies." Palm's press release about the agreement was a bit more definite about what this meant:

    Palm has secured an expansion of its existing patent license from ACCESS to cover all current and future Palm products, regardless of the underlying operating system. [emphasis mine]

    I've gone into some detail in several other posts about the evidence that Palm needed this agreement to enable it to develop it's own Linux-based successor to the Palm OS, apart from that being developed by ACCESS. If I'm right about this, what makes the renaming of Palm OS Garnet so interesting, is that it actually clears the way for Palm to give the name "Palm OS" to its next-generation operating system. Palm owns the brand, it owns its OS, and as of this week no other company will be able to use the name Palm OS.

    The Palm brand had become quite a mess in the last few years, what with the ill-fated PalmOne/PalmSource split and the subsequent buyout of PalmSource, but since Ed Colligan took the helm at Palm he's done a great job in putting the brand back together again. More than just the brand, he has hired back many of the original developers of the Palm OS and regained the right to build the next generation of the Palm OS. From where I stand it looks like this project has been under way for at least a couple of years, and I expect we'll be hearing an announcement about a modernized but Garnet-compatible "Palm System 7" (or some such) within the next few months.


    Sprint 07 roadmap

    http://www.engadgetmobile.com/2007/0...1h-07-roadmap/
    02-02-2007 02:33 AM
  7. surur's Avatar
    So this OpenGL accelerator is going to accelerate JAVASCRIPT? I dint think you realize how many orders of magnitude faster desktop processors are than ARM processors. BTW, thank you for confirming that the Iphone runs on ARM. That firmly brackets the maximum performance of the Iphone.

    BTW - last we heard the Iphone has no voice control. Are you assuming again?

    Surur
    02-02-2007 03:40 AM
  8. archie's Avatar
    So this OpenGL accelerator is going to accelerate JAVASCRIPT? I dint think you realize how many orders of magnitude faster desktop processors are than ARM processors. BTW, thank you for confirming that the Iphone runs on ARM. That firmly brackets the maximum performance of the Iphone.
    Did you not read the article? I can't believe how unbelievably stupid you sound when you are trying to be a smart-a$$ in dodging the issue and pretending my response doesn't address your questions, or in this case, your false assumptions.

    BTW - last we heard the Iphone has no voice control. Are you assuming again?

    Surur
    Apparently you missed it the first, second and third time I have mentioned it here in this part of the forum, so I'll say it again. The iPod CURRENTLY has support for voice tags. The iPhone WILL have support for voice tags.
    02-02-2007 11:49 AM
  9. surur's Avatar
    Did you not read the article? I can't believe how unbelievably stupid you sound when you are trying to be a smart-a$$ in dodging the issue and pretending my response doesn't address your questions, or in this case, your false assumptions.
    Archie, I forgive you for not reading the whole thread in the rush to shoot your mouth off, but its about editing documents using AJAX based applications. You are the one who is not answering the problem. Explain to me again how accelerating graphics is going to speed up pagination?

    Apparently you missed it the first, second and third time I have mentioned it here in this part of the forum, so I'll say it again. The iPod CURRENTLY has support for voice tags. The iPhone WILL have support for voice tags.
    Sorry, I missed the post where you said Apple gave you an IPhone. They must have, because the people who have actually used the phone say:

    Can you tell us what other features the IPhone have. It must be nice having all that insider information, and not just be ***uming stuff.

    Surur
    02-02-2007 01:48 PM
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