1. Joemhz's Avatar
    This Info World article points out some problems with IPhone's push email. Looks like BB still has the edge here.


    Bye-bye, BlackBerry? Not so fast | InfoWorld | Analysis | 2008-06-16 | By Tom Kaneshige
    06-19-2008 10:01 AM
  2. hermdog's Avatar
    This Info World article points out some problems with IPhone's push email. Looks like BB still has the edge here.


    Bye-bye, BlackBerry? Not so fast | InfoWorld | Analysis | 2008-06-16 | By Tom Kaneshige
    Good article. But what I think would be a better comparison of the 2.0 software would be with Windows Mobile phones. Not Blackberry's. So will the iPhone out do the BB's messaging strengths maybe not, but neither can other Win Mobile phones. For me the the iPhone is a having the best browsing and multimedia/ apps with Windows mobiles messaging.

    If the iPhone did not exist (hush yo mouth boy!) I would choose BB over Windows Mobile. The BB OS is much much stabler.
    06-19-2008 10:58 AM
  3. xintelinsanex's Avatar
    The article was a good read, a bit long though. The stuff about push e-mail, for the most part, I agree with it. The problem is that the iPhone is an infant product, and it will take sometime for it to catch up. When Blackberry first started out, it probably had the same growing pains. Google has an infrastructure in place that could easily solve Apple's problem with real time pushing e-mail. Apple could just expand their partnership with Google and make their system that much better.
    06-19-2008 11:49 AM
  4. IrishJK09's Avatar
    The misconception about the iPhone's multitasking abilities is getting to me...

    At any point in time on a phone call you can press the Home button and get to the home screen. You can then go into any application you want except for Safari (not sure about the iPod, never tried). The reason you can't use Safari while on the phone is because of the EDGE network, not the phone itself. EDGE doesn't allow for simultaneous data and voice transfer.

    The iPhone SDK may not allow 3rd party developers to have background applications/processes, but that doesn't mean the phone itself doesn't have any. Apple is not the 3rd party, and they can do whatever they want with their own device. I am not saying that the iPhone is a true multitasking phone, but certain things do run in the background at all times.
    06-19-2008 12:16 PM
  5. hermdog's Avatar
    The misconception about the iPhone's multitasking abilities is getting to me...

    At any point in time on a phone call you can press the Home button and get to the home screen. You can then go into any application you want except for Safari (not sure about the iPod, never tried). The reason you can't use Safari while on the phone is because of the EDGE network, not the phone itself. EDGE doesn't allow for simultaneous data and voice transfer.

    The iPhone SDK may not allow 3rd party developers to have background applications/processes, but that doesn't mean the phone itself doesn't have any. Apple is not the 3rd party, and they can do whatever they want with their own device. I am not saying that the iPhone is a true multitasking phone, but certain things do run in the background at all times.
    Not being able to browse while on the phone is not a big issue for me. I can't do it now on my Treo 700wx, It says to end the call, to browse. Not a big deal.
    06-19-2008 12:35 PM
  6. JasonHDD's Avatar
    The misconception about the iPhone's multitasking abilities is getting to me...

    At any point in time on a phone call you can press the Home button and get to the home screen. You can then go into any application you want except for Safari (not sure about the iPod, never tried). The reason you can't use Safari while on the phone is because of the EDGE network, not the phone itself. EDGE doesn't allow for simultaneous data and voice transfer.

    The iPhone SDK may not allow 3rd party developers to have background applications/processes, but that doesn't mean the phone itself doesn't have any. Apple is not the 3rd party, and they can do whatever they want with their own device. I am not saying that the iPhone is a true multitasking phone, but certain things do run in the background at all times.
    you're at it again uh, craze???
    06-19-2008 02:07 PM
  7. IrishJK09's Avatar
    Look here CrackBerry straggler! I kid, I kid...

    I am serious though. It is irritating that because Apple doesn't allow 3rd party apps to be run in the background, everyone assumes that is universal for the entire phone. SMS, Mail, Calendar, the iPod, and the Phone all perform background processes.

    If nothing ran in the background, you wouldn't be able to listen to the iPod while you use every other feature of the phone (except talk that is). If nothing ran in the background, you wouldn't get notification of new text messages, phone calls, and emails while browsing the web, using Notes, checking the Weather, etc.

    The iPhone doesn't kill everything either, it suspends certain things, like Safari. If you are browsing in Safari and have 4 separate windows open, all loaded to a different page and hide it to go to the home screen, it will suspend your positions. When you open Safari again, it will still be just like you were looking at it before (it may take you back to the top of the page though, I can't recall).

    This is why I get so annoyed when people b*tch and moan about no multitasking. They are completely missing the concept of how the iPhone handles these functions, and that while it may not be true multitasking, it is hardly detrimental. Especially in the case of instant messaging...

    One of the biggest complaints is that you can't have an IM app without allowing it to run in the background. Apple's push notification system will clearly kill that problem, and it isn't like you can IM AND use the browser at the same time on any other phone anyway. Simultaneously that is.

    For example, if you are using a BlackBerry Curve to browse the web and an IM comes in, you will get a notification. You now have to minimize or close the browser and open the IM app to see the new message. When you are done, you have to minimize the IM app and go back to the browser.

    With the iPhone's push notification system, you will get that same new message notification, and you will press home to get to the home screen. Now you open the IM app, and you will see your old conversation with the new message all the same. You now press the home button, press Safari and resume browsing right where you left off.

    It is the same thing. It requires the same number of button presses on the iPhone as it does on the BlackBerry, but minus the crappy menu scrolling. The only real difference is that the iPhone handles it in a way that doesn't sop up system resources. It is also universal across the other features of the phone, I just chose the browser because that is probably the feature most used.
    Last edited by CrazEtooN; 06-19-2008 at 03:36 PM. Reason: typo
    06-19-2008 03:32 PM
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