1. sparksd's Avatar
    What have you found the iPad able to to that the Android tablets could not, and vise versa?

    Also, some of those tablets are older, so take that into account... Just curious...

    I really want the next generation NVidia Shield tablet with the Tegra X1 processor in it. Finally, true desktop gaming performance in a tablet.
    I use my Air 2 primarily as a consumption device. What I have really liked about it is subjective user experience, the really big things being performance (no lag) and stability (no app crashes, restarts, etc.) - it is entirely dependable. I'm a retired s/w engineer with over 40 years experience so I have the time and knowledge to be able to fiddle with my devices to improve performance - rooting, loading custom ROMs - but I really don't want to anymore. I just want a device that is "snappy" and always works. I've used the newer Samsung tablets but I don't care so much for the AMOLED displays and their color rendering.

    What can't I do on my Air 2 that I can on Android? I do my photo work on travel using my Asus TF700T 10" tablet with clamshell keyboard. I put my camera's SD card in the keyboard's SD card slot, use a file browser to select all (usually many dozens each day) of the RAW files at once and copy them to an internal memory folder of choice (or to the internal microSD card), use Photo Mate R2 to edit them from that location and export JPEG to another folder, use QuickPic to view those JPEGs, and then copy the files to a backup portable HDD plugged into the keyboard's USB port. Try doing this workflow on an iPad, particularly when you have poor or no Internet connectivity. This gets back to some of the shortcomings in iOS that others have discussed.
    11-02-2015 05:54 PM
  2. SquireSCA's Avatar
    I use my Air 2 primarily as a consumption device. What I have really liked about it is subjective user experience, the really big things being performance (no lag) and stability (no app crashes, restarts, etc.) - it is entirely dependable. I'm a retired s/w engineer with over 40 years experience so I have the time and knowledge to be able to fiddle with my devices to improve performance - rooting, loading custom ROMs - but I really don't want to anymore. I just want a device that is "snappy" and always works. I've used the newer Samsung tablets but I don't care so much for the AMOLED displays and their color rendering.

    What can't I do on my Air 2 that I can on Android? I do my photo work on travel using my Asus TF700T 10" tablet with clamshell keyboard. I put my camera's SD card in the keyboard's SD card slot, use a file browser to select all (usually many dozens each day) of the RAW files at once and copy them to an internal memory folder of choice (or to the internal microSD card), use Photo Mate R2 to edit them from that location and export JPEG to another folder, use QuickPic to view those JPEGs, and then copy the files to a backup portable HDD plugged into the keyboard's USB port. Try doing this workflow on an iPad, particularly when you have poor or no Internet connectivity. This gets back to some of the shortcomings in iOS that others have discussed.
    That all makes sense. As for no lag, I cannot make the same claim with my Air 2... I see lag in Safari constantly... It's better than it was on the iPad Mini 2 Retina, but it is still there at time. if I reboot or manually close down the background apps it is better, but to be honest, I can have 15 background apps on my Nexus 6 and not see a fraction of the lag.

    I have tried hard resets, wiping it, trying out the public beta's, etc... It is certainly usable, but it is there...
    11-02-2015 06:05 PM
  3. sparksd's Avatar
    That all makes sense. As for no lag, I cannot make the same claim with my Air 2... I see lag in Safari constantly... It's better than it was on the iPad Mini 2 Retina, but it is still there at time. if I reboot or manually close down the background apps it is better, but to be honest, I can have 15 background apps on my Nexus 6 and not see a fraction of the lag.

    I have tried hard resets, wiping it, trying out the public beta's, etc... It is certainly usable, but it is there...
    I've been using Chrome and Puffin most of the time. Have you tried any of the iOS 9 ad blockers? Lag is really irritating - I don't know how many times I've wiped my Android devices, cleared cache partitions, etc. Knock on wood for my Air 2 ...
    11-02-2015 06:11 PM
  4. tech_fan's Avatar
    I went from the Samsung and Nexus to Apple. Actually, I started out with the early DROIDs and then switched to the iPhone 4 and 5. Then I switched to the Note 3, Edge and Nexus before going back to Apple.

    Overall I like Apple better and think I will remain with Apple for awhile. I also had the Galaxy Gear series and Android Wear. I now have the Apple watch and like that much better than the Samsung and Android Wear.
    jessmags likes this.
    11-02-2015 08:38 PM
  5. SquireSCA's Avatar
    I've been using Chrome and Puffin most of the time. Have you tried any of the iOS 9 ad blockers? Lag is really irritating - I don't know how many times I've wiped my Android devices, cleared cache partitions, etc. Knock on wood for my Air 2 ...
    The problem is that I hate clicking on a link and having to copy and paste it from Safari into Chrome.

    That might be the single most infuriating aspect of iOS... their refusal to let you use whatever app you want... Especially when their app sucks...
    jessmags likes this.
    11-03-2015 08:50 AM
  6. Evilguppy's Avatar
    The Air 2 is going to be around for at least another year since they released the Pro this year instead of the Air 3, so I'd go with the Air 2, it will be supported for quite a while longer.
    11-03-2015 01:25 PM
  7. heberman's Avatar
    My iPad Air 2 is far more than a "consumption device" or an "entertainment device". I'm a trial lawyer and I use mine for work stuff. Trial presentation, evidence preparation, deposition review and notations, Word documents, emails, etc.

    If you want to treat it like a Windows computer, of course it won't perform the same. It's a different device with a different kind of workflow. I don't drag files from thumb drives or zip files. I use Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive for my files. All of my documents are available to me - all the time. Who uses physical media anymore?

    When I need to put together a pdf document by converting a Word doc to pdf and then add pages from other pdf documents - the iPad works faster than my full-blown Adobe Acrobat on the desktop. When I walk into a courtroom with 10,000 pages of reference files on my iPad, I can access any document I need quicker on the iPad than on any laptop.

    It's all about workflow. If you try to replicate your Windows workflow on the iPad it doesn't work. If, however, you use the iPad with a workflow that takes advantage of its strengths, it can be better than a laptop or desktop experience. The Air 2 is a beast, performance-wise. I say don't wait. If the new iPad Air 3 is released in the spring and it blows away the Air 2, you will be able to unload your Air 2 for a decent price and upgrade. iPads hold their value very well.
    11-03-2015 05:16 PM
  8. SquireSCA's Avatar
    My iPad Air 2 is far more than a "consumption device" or an "entertainment device". I'm a trial lawyer and I use mine for work stuff. Trial presentation, evidence preparation, deposition review and notations, Word documents, emails, etc.

    If you want to treat it like a Windows computer, of course it won't perform the same. It's a different device with a different kind of workflow. I don't drag files from thumb drives or zip files. I use Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive for my files. All of my documents are available to me - all the time. Who uses physical media anymore?

    When I need to put together a pdf document by converting a Word doc to pdf and then add pages from other pdf documents - the iPad works faster than my full-blown Adobe Acrobat on the desktop. When I walk into a courtroom with 10,000 pages of reference files on my iPad, I can access any document I need quicker on the iPad than on any laptop.

    It's all about workflow. If you try to replicate your Windows workflow on the iPad it doesn't work. If, however, you use the iPad with a workflow that takes advantage of its strengths, it can be better than a laptop or desktop experience. The Air 2 is a beast, performance-wise. I say don't wait. If the new iPad Air 3 is released in the spring and it blows away the Air 2, you will be able to unload your Air 2 for a decent price and upgrade. iPads hold their value very well.
    If it works for you, great, although there isn't a single thing you listed that cannot be done equally well on any other platform.

    Who uses physical media? Those that don't have an LTE chip with unlimited data or constant access to wifi. Those that travel frequently and want to have to pay for wifi on the plane when they want to work on files or watch movies...

    It's nice to be able to pick up a cheap 64gb MicroSD card for $20 shipped on Amazon, rather than pay an extra $100 or more to get that much on a larger iPad. It is also nice to have the ability to just swap out memory cards when you need to. Maybe they are not even files for consumption on the device, maybe just using your tablet or phone AS a thumb drive, rather than having to carry around multiple devices.

    It's nice to use my GoPro and take my video from the racetrack and just drop the card into the tablet. With the iPad, it isn't that simple. I bought the Camera reader dongle and could never get it to work right. On an Android phone, tablet or Windows tablet, just slap the MicroSD card in, access it like you would any hard drive and start editing and uploading to YouTube, etc... To get it on the iPad, I had to bring a laptop, put the card in that, push it to the cloud and then back down... When each file is 4GB, it chews up a ton of time and data...

    The iPad is just a larger iphone but without the phone. It doesn't do anything that the phone doesn't already do, it just does it on a larger screen.

    My friend is a mac fanatic and we were at dinner one night and he had half the table filled up with all his crap... He had his hotspot because for some reason his iPhone wouldn't act as one at the time, he had his laptop for actual work stuff, then he had his iPad... It was funny seeing how he had to have half a table of devices in order to cover all bases.

    When a Surface and any phone would do everything you could need.

    Anyway, if it works for you, great, but when people ask what the difference in platforms is, everyone should expect to hear both sides, otherwise it doesn't even make sense to bother responding to the OP if we aren't going to give her valid pros and cons of each...
    11-03-2015 06:11 PM
  9. heberman's Avatar




    The iPad is just a larger iphone but without the phone. It doesn't do anything that the phone doesn't already do, it just does it on a larger screen.

    ...

    When a Surface and any phone would do everything you could need.

    .
    Really? Fanboyism at its finest. Have fun with your Surface.
    Evilguppy and Closingracer like this.
    11-03-2015 07:20 PM
  10. SquireSCA's Avatar
    Really? Fanboyism at its finest. Have fun with your Surface.
    Well, I don't have a surface, I have an iPad Air 2, so there goes your poorly constructed and predicable fanboy argument when you don't like someone's post but don't have a factual way to refute it. Nice try, better luck next time.

    Your comment about workflow makes sense, even if all you are really saying is, "if you can change your work habits to conform to the limitations of the iPad, it works fine"...

    A most salient and accurate point, that.
    jessmags and Xandroid like this.
    11-03-2015 07:24 PM
  11. muchospanish's Avatar
    I think Squire spends entirely too much time pushing his opinions on everyone.
    heberman, ftahir and Closingracer like this.
    11-03-2015 09:43 PM
  12. SquireSCA's Avatar
    I think Squire spends entirely too much time pushing his opinions on everyone.
    When people ask for them. Or did you only want me to reply if my opinion matches yours? Just let me know what the rules are so that I only post things that you want to hear.
    jessmags likes this.
    11-03-2015 09:45 PM
  13. muchospanish's Avatar
    It's all about workflow. If you try to replicate your Windows workflow on the iPad it doesn't work. If, however, you use the iPad with a workflow that takes advantage of its strengths, it can be better than a laptop or desktop experience.
    That's it exactly. That's how I feel about my iPad at work.
    heberman likes this.
    11-03-2015 09:48 PM
  14. harrykatsaros's Avatar
    Almost everything you said here was wrong.

    1. " Screen aspect ratio, as the other guy mentioned. Most HD format is widescreen, so Android lets you use the entire screen for watching video, without cropping. If you watch a lot of movies, this could be a factor."

    This is right but also very wrong. Motion pictures are not shot in 16:9 let alone 16:10. The huge huge majority of movies are shot in either 1.85:1 or 2.39:1. No matter what device you use those black letterbox bars will always be there. Even when watching a movie on a widescreen HD TV those bars are unavoidable. If we are talking TV shows then yes, those are almost all she in 16:9.

    2. "The iPad Air 2 gets insane battery life. I charge it like twice a week and I use it daily. It is that good, and I don't know of anything on the Android side of the tablet world that can touch it.
    . Stock Android has no split screen apps for realtime multitasking, no picture in picture for video content."


    This is true but there is a reason for this which I will get to later because you actually listed it as a disadvantage.

    3. "The iPad will have a lot less options than Android. The OS is not much different than it was in 2007. There is no real desktop environment, no widgets or real time data... just an old slab of icons that you can't really customize, that you can manually launch one at a time... If you care about widgets and live email, message, RSS feeds, weather, music, etc... iOS will leave you wanting. It requires you to determine what you want, go find the appropriate app and manually launch them one at a time."

    Saying that iOS is not much different than it was in 2007 is ridiculous. As far as having a desktop environment, this paradigm is completely illogical in mobile and is a key reason for iOS's Today screen implementation of widgets.

    Android widgets are only useful from the launcher. The whole point of the device is to get stuff done and not spend all your time looking at the launcher. iOS is designed to get you in and out of apps, Apple didn't want the launcher to be a destination because you can't actually do anything from the launcher apart from launch stuff. Its kind of the point. This is the reason that iOS accounts for 25-35% of all mobile devices but 80-90% of mobile web traffic, you're not sitting on your launcher staring at app icons, you're busy doing stuff.

    iOS widgets DO in fact include all of your live email, message, RSS feeds, weather, music, etc information and are 10 x more useful for quick glance information since you can invoke the today screen from not only the app grid launcher but also from the lock screen and from within apps.

    The widgets in iOS also serve a functional purpose as all widgets are tied to apps that you own and have installed on your device. Android widgets are often random web snippets masquerading as functional spaces when they don't in fact lead to any coinciding app or website where you can achieve anything or dive into a deeper resource of relevant information. ALL iOS widgets are windows into an app that actually does something.

    iOS also offers all the same third party keyboards you can find on Android, has an almost identical app switcher for multitasking, a universal quick reply function for responding to texts from any app from anywhere in the system that Android can't touch, individualised app permissions (which Google is copying in Android M), dynamic wi-fi identification keys and discreet query in Safari so that wi-fi networks and Google can't track all of your app usage and browsing history, and control centre for access to quick settings toggles.

    iOS on iPad now also offers full split view apps for true side by side multitasking and picture in picture for video content. Stock Android is yet to feature any such functionality. Not to mention the fact that developer support for the iPad blows away dev support for Android with apps that are designed specifically for the iPad, as opposed to the vast majority of Android tablet apps which are merely jumbo-sized phone apps with giant fonts and big empty wasted spaces that don't do anything. To call the iPad Air a glorified e-reader while declaring Android tablets tools for real work is absolute nonsense. Android tablets are for browsing Facebook and watching YouTube videos. iPads are in fact work tools. There is a reason why they account for 80-90% of corporate tablet deployments in the Fortune 500.

    The only thing I can't do on my iOS devices, thankfully, is set Comic-Sans as a system wide font.

    4. "There is no user file system. Each app has it's own sandbox. If you want a file to be opened in more than one app, you need more than one copy of that file, one for each app."

    This is perhaps the most wrong thing you mentioned in your piece. Since iOS 8 the iOS file system is independent of any app. You DO NOT need multiple copies of the same file for different apps and despite being sandboxed all apps can speak to each other. I can edit photos using the toolkit of any photo editing app installed on my device without ever leaving my stock Photos app. All edits are non destructive, which means I never lose my original file and all apps that handle photos have access to that file and all of its delta edits.

    Furthermore, as of iOS 9 you now also have an iCloud app where you can organise your files in a traditional file system hierarchy.

    5. "No simple drag and drop USB functionality. An Advantage of Android is that it is universal, just plug it into a Windows, Linux or MacOS device and it pops up like a thumb drive. Drag and drop all day long, doesn't matter what type of file, no iTunes telling you that you can't transfer that file format, etc..."

    It is true that you need to use iTunes to move files onto your iOS device via USB but iTunes does not limit what types of files you can move to your device. Also, I don't know anyone that actually does this anymore. I sometimes move my .mkv's into Infuse using USB because I'm dealing with 4-5GB files but apart from that I never have a need for the function, everything is in the cloud now. Pictures, videos, music, movies, etc... all automatic, all in the cloud.

    6. "No expanded storage with Apple. You either couple up $100 more for an extra 32GB that cost apple less than $2 to include, or up your data plan and use cloud storage... Many Android devices have MicroSD slots which can be VERY useful for transporting large files, or housing an extensive multimedia library, installing extra apps, etc... Heck, with a $5 OTG cable I can just plug my 3TB external HD in to my phone or tablet and access it just like a PC would..."

    You got this absolutely right. If you really want to, you can buy attachments to add an SD slot to your iPhone/iPad via the Lightning charger port but thats a bit fiddly. And I know that this isn't the case for everyone but I have an extensive library of movies and TV shows on my 3TB drive that I've never actually gone back to watch. Eventually you've downloaded so much crap that you just forget all about it and suddenly that 3TB drive that you needed so desperately sits in a drawer collecting dust.

    I mostly download, watch, delete. And for almost all intents and purposes, Netflix is my library. I think this is a way overplayed Android advantage that doesn't actually get used anywhere near as much as people like to claim, which is why a lot of Android OEM's are no longer providing expandable storage.

    7. "More customization with Android, if that matters to you. There is NONE on Apple devices."

    Beating a dead horse here. Refer back to point 3. If Comic-Sans is your thing than by all means.

    8. "Apple puts the absolute minimum amount of RAM into their devices as part of their "planned obsolescence" marketing strategy... I had an iPad Mini 2 Retina and had to return it, the 1GB of RAM, not seen in Android in several years, was completely inadequate. Sluggish, constant page reloads when browsing, it just didn't have enough RAM, and as a result the newer features like split screen and multitasking, wouldn't work on it... so that is how they get you to upgrade..."


    Apple's A series SoC's are miles ahead of any other ARM based chipsets. The latest A series SoC's on 2GB RAM have been demonstrated to outperform competing SoC's running on 3-4GB RAM. But I will concede that page reloads were a major pain in the a$$ before the most recent upgrades to 2GB RAM. But the low RAM inclusions were not planned obsolescence that Apple conspiracy theorists like to talk about. My 24 inch iMac is 8 years old and still runs smooth as the day I bought it, not exactly a sound obsolescence strategy.

    The low RAM inclusions, made possible by the A series SoC, are actually part of a huge competitive advantage over competing devices. You mentioned it yourself earlier. Battery life. There is a reason Android can't keep up with iPads in battery life, and it all boils down to the A series SoC's and iOS's low RAM demands.

    But as these devices have become more powerful, the RAM demands have increased. This is why Apple no longer does its famous "extra battery life in the latest release" plug at launch events, its now just able to get enough extra juice to cater for the extra RAM in newer releases. Advances in battery tech are lagging.

    Also, you complain about not being able to do side by side multitasking on the old iPad Mini. As I stated earlier, stock Android doesn't offer ANY side by side multitasking whatsoever. I know Samsung has included some multitasking functionality in there tablets, but just as with almost all TouchWiz based feature extensions its unreliable and its implementation is pretty clunky

    I can't think of a single feature that current Android has over current iOS apart from customisation of control centre toggles. Seriously, that's it. You can't change system fonts, create empty spaces between app icons or customise app icons but I'm not a 13 year old kid who needs to turn my device into a Hello Kitty collage. I was an iPhone 4 user who switched to Android 4.0 and the Galaxy Nexus when I grew sick of the limitations of iOS several years ago. I switched back to iOS last year with the iPhone 6 Plus and was happy to find that iOS was a completely different OS to the one that I abandoned in 2011. Feature-wise, the two OS's are very close. But, and this is the reason I went back to iOS to begin with, security wise, Android is a horrible horrible platform.
    11-04-2015 12:40 PM
  15. harrykatsaros's Avatar
    That all makes sense. As for no lag, I cannot make the same claim with my Air 2... I see lag in Safari constantly... It's better than it was on the iPad Mini 2 Retina, but it is still there at time. if I reboot or manually close down the background apps it is better, but to be honest, I can have 15 background apps on my Nexus 6 and not see a fraction of the lag.

    I have tried hard resets, wiping it, trying out the public beta's, etc... It is certainly usable, but it is there...
    That doesn't make sense. Closing the apps in the background doesn't actually do anything. Background apps in iOS are not actually open and not using up any CPU power. I'm sure you experience lag as you're saying but it should make no difference if you close background apps or just leave them there. The only apps that continue to use any background processes at all are apps with active audio playback.
    11-04-2015 12:44 PM
  16. SquireSCA's Avatar
    In the newer versions of iOS where it does pseudo multitasking, it does keep the other programs that you opened in RAM. They may not be actively running and consuming much in the way of CPU cycles, but they are taking up RAM which runs out very quickly, so when you are browsing and have a few tabs open, it runs out of RAM and has to reload those other tabs when you return to them.

    Using the SInfoCheck App...

    I have 43mb free of my 2GB. The only apps I have in the app manager app:

    SInfoCheck
    Safari
    Mail
    Facebook
    Youtube
    Suntrust Bank app

    That's it, and I am almost out of available RAM.

    When I manually shut those apps down and check SInfoCheck again, I jumped up to 859MB free

    I can post screen caps or a video if you want.
    Xandroid and sparksd like this.
    11-04-2015 12:58 PM
  17. sparksd's Avatar
    In the newer versions of iOS where it does pseudo multitasking, it does keep the other programs that you opened in RAM. They may not be actively running and consuming much in the way of CPU cycles, but they are taking up RAM which runs out very quickly, so when you are browsing and have a few tabs open, it runs out of RAM and has to reload those other tabs when you return to them.

    Using the SInfoCheck App...

    I have 43mb free of my 2GB. The only apps I have in the app manager app:

    SInfoCheck
    Safari
    Mail
    Facebook
    Youtube
    Suntrust Bank app

    That's it, and I am almost out of available RAM.

    When I manually shut those apps down and check SInfoCheck again, I jumped up to 859MB free

    I can post screen caps or a video if you want.
    Exactly - they may not be burning CPU but they are using memory. I've looked at the same thing using the "Status" app.
    11-04-2015 01:51 PM
  18. harrykatsaros's Avatar
    Dude, just let it go. Owning a phone and actually understanding how it works, are two different things... Just some things off the top of my head over the past several years of owning both platforms...

    1) For a long time, you couldn't copy and paste between apps
    2) For a long time, you couldn't send pictures or video through MMS, you were forced to use email
    3) No expandable storage
    4) No customization
    5) Only in the latest iOS 9 are Apple devices finally able to sorta multitask
    6) No widgets or real-time data
    7) After years of Android having a nice notification bar, Apple finally copied it last year.
    8) Long upgrade cycles, every 12-14 months, limited models typically defined by color or the amount of storage, every other update is an incremental update only
    9) Years behind the time on screen size, the iPhone 6+ finally got with the program, and it was a sales hit!
    10) Many of their devices come with not enough RAM that slows it down and makes it "incompatible" with some of the new features
    11) Proprietary plugs and cables rather than industry standards
    12) No ability to use as a standard USB storage device
    13) No ability to view alternative video and audio formats... not easily anyway...
    14) Heavy reliance on iTunes to do anything, which isn't much
    15) Until recently, true HD screens were not on the table
    16) Odd-ball screen resolutions limit screen real estate for watching movies
    17) No ability to select your default apps, you MUST use the Apple approved apps and then copy and paste links over, etc... Asinine...
    18) Plenty of teething issues with Apple Maps
    19) No ability to remove and replace a battery, which is nice when you are traveling, or camping, etc...
    20) No Back Button. They added a "return to Gmail" or whatever button, but it is not the same as being able to back up, no matter what screen you are on
    21) No seamless integration with the majority of Google services, which is pretty much what the world runs on.
    22) Lack of hardware choices... Android provides different makers, form factors, price points, styles, different features, rugged phones, etc...
    23) Apple finally got 4k video 2 years after everyone else

    If I sat here and really thought about it, or used Google, I could double or triple that list.

    So, to answer your question of "how is Android ahead", there you go, that's a good start...

    To which you will call me a fanboi, and claim that none of those things matter to you, disregarding the fact that they are absolutely true...

    And then I will tell you to enjoy your iPhone and STFU and let us get back on topic and answer this woman's request for advice?

    So can we do that, please?
    Dude, just let it go. Owning a phone and actually understanding how it works, are two different things... Just some things off the top of my head over the past several years of owning both platforms...

    1) For a long time, you couldn't copy and paste between apps

    When did this ever happen? There was no copy and paste period on iPhoneOS v.1 and affected about 4 people using the first iPhone exclusively on AT&T in the US for a little while, but that was almost a decade ago. You might as well complain 2G download speeds while you're at it.

    2) For a long time, you couldn't send pictures or video through MMS, you were forced to use email

    This was a carrier restriction for a first gen product, and its the reason Apple created iMessage.

    3) No expandable storage

    Most over hyped aspect of Android. Nobody uses it and I've never found myself wishing I had it. Splitting memory stacks is just a major pain. The cloud is in and expandable memory is being dropped en masse by Android OEMs.

    4) No customisation

    Comic-Sans system wide fonts and Hello Kitty style icons, yeah no thanks.

    5) Only in the latest iOS 9 are Apple devices finally able to sorta multitask

    Full cross app permissions and extensions, side by side multitasking and picture in picture for video content. Stock Android is the OS that features zero multitasking. And Samsung devices with their half-baked TouchWiz multitasking implementations are the devices that "sorta multitask". Its clunky and works like advertised sometimes, but its there.

    6) No widgets or real-time data

    The biggest lie still being peddled by Android users. iOS DOES HAVE real time data and widgets. And the widgets are not random web snippets that are not linked to websites or apps with an actual functional purpose. ALL iOS widgets are associated with an app so that when you click them they lead to a destination which actually features further relevant information.

    iOS widgets are not locked in the app launcher. Apple didn't want the app launcher to be a destination. You use it to launch apps, its kind of the point. iOS is designed specifically to keep you in apps doing stuff and not blankly staring at a bunch of app icons on the app launcher.


    Furthermore, widgets in iOS are 100x more useful because by putting its widgets in the Today screen you can invoke them to access real time data and glances from anywhere in the OS, including the lock screen, the launcher and from within other apps without having to close them.

    7) After years of Android having a nice notification bar, Apple finally copied it last year.

    They both stole the notification tray from Palm years ago. What are you talking about?

    8) Long upgrade cycles, every 12-14 months, limited models typically defined by color or the amount of storage, every other update is an incremental update only

    Uhm, how is that different for Android? or Windows? or phones in general? How many phones do you go through in 12 months?

    9) Years behind the time on screen size, the iPhone 6+ finally got with the program, and it was a sales hit!

    Yes it was. And they are now eating back into Android's market share. This is the problem. Apple is patient and people are not. Apple understands that it is a marathon and they have to be around for the next 50-100 years. They are not in a hurry to give you everything, because if they do then what do they give you next year. This is how companies fall. This is how Sony went from tech titan to the brink of extinction.

    10) Many of their devices come with not enough RAM that slows it down and makes it "incompatible" with some of the new features

    This was a strategy to keep battery life up. This is why iPad s*its all over any other tablet for battery life. The Apple A series SoC was designed specifically for this purpose, to be low RAM reliant.

    11) Proprietary plugs and cables rather than industry standards

    One plug. And its not proprietary, its an open standard invented by Intel. Apple was just the only one smart enough to adapt it being that its much faster than USB for data transfer speeds and features zero moving parts or pins. One solid piece of metal, kind of hard to break it.

    12) No ability to use as a standard USB storage device

    Yeah, but the cloud. And you can, you just need to perform the drag and drop in iTunes instead of through Explorer or Finder. Not hard at all actually if you take like 5 seconds to learn where it is.

    13) No ability to view alternative video and audio formats... not easily anyway...

    App Store - VLC... and you're done.

    14) Heavy reliance on iTunes to do anything, which isn't much

    USB drive data transfers and music library if you're not on a streaming service. That's literally the only two things you need iTunes for. Everything else is automatic through iCloud. Just like Google accounts and Android. iTunes hasn't had that sort of relationship with iOS devices in about 5 years.

    15) Until recently, true HD screens were not on the table

    Again, marathon not a race. What are you going to do with that many pixels on a 4 inch screen?

    16) Odd-ball screen resolutions limit screen real estate for watching movies

    This is iPad only and 4:3 is for work. 16:9 makes it a TV screen that's not practical for much else because in portrait its ridiculous. And almost all movies are shot in 1.18:1 or 2.39:1. It doesn't matter what device you use, those black letterbox bars are unavoidable.

    17) No ability to select your default apps, you MUST use the Apple approved apps and then copy and paste links over, etc... Asinine...

    This is a solid point, but I personally don't mind. Safari is the best mobile browser on iOS my a mile and Mail has always been my default for email and it works fine. You don't need to copy and paste over links anymore either. Share sheets make this a one click process.

    18) Plenty of teething issues with Apple Maps

    Marathon. After 3 years they have caught up to about 80-90% of Google Maps in terms of accuracy and features. And after transit fully rolls out it will be pretty much on par. Considering Google Maps has a decade head start, they've done a pretty decent job. But yes it was awful at the start and they apologised for it.

    19) No ability to remove and replace a battery, which is nice when you are traveling, or camping, etc...

    Blah blah blah. I can't tell you how many people always bring this up to me. You know how many of them have a second battery?.. NONE!! NOT ONE SINGLE ONE! and besides this is going the way of the Dodo. Android OEM's are dropping this en masse too. Samsung and HTC are all going unibody.

    20) No Back Button. They added a "return to Gmail" or whatever button, but it is not the same as being able to back up, no matter what screen you are on

    Been a problem in the past but just swipe from the left of the screen on iPhone 6s. Thats it, pretty simple. The "return" button is for older devices.


    21) No seamless integration with the majority of Google services, which is pretty much what the world runs on.

    Completely false. Google is fully baked in. Mail, contacts, calendars, etc. baked into the stock phone settings. Photos and maps from the app store just like on any Android OEM device.

    22) Lack of hardware choices... Android provides different makers, form factors, price points, styles, different features, rugged phones, etc...

    Yes, but Apple is no hardware slouch. They make some of the best devices. Hardware has always been Apple's strong suit. That's what brought them back from the brink in 1997 with the iMac.

    23) Apple finally got 4k video 2 years after everyone else

    And they have already sold more 4K cameras than every other 4K capable device ever sold combined. But its still pointless unless you shelled out big on a UHD TV recently.

    If I sat here and really thought about it, or used Google, I could double or triple that list.

    So, to answer your question of "how is Android ahead", there you go, that's a good start...

    nope still lost on that one...
    heberman and muchospanish like this.
    11-04-2015 02:05 PM
  19. SquireSCA's Avatar
    Yeah, so I am sitting here with just a couple apps open, and I have almost no memory left, which is what usually causes the page reloads and lag.

    I can have like 15 apps running on my phone and still have plenty of RAM left and no such issues.

    I have seen many arguments as to why Apple only puts a little RAM in their devices. SOme say "they don't need as much", but I have pretty much proven that to be false. Some say cost... but what does 1GB of RAM cost in bulk? Fitty cents? If that?

    Some say that because Apple sells so many devices, that doubling the RAM in their devices would cripple the memory market and cause supply chain issues... But Samsung sells more phones than Apple does, and they put 3GB and are about to start putting in 4GB.

    Now, some say you just don't need that much.

    I prefer to buy with room to grow. I don't buy for exactly what my needs re RIGHT NOW, because you will invariably outgrow it.

    eg. a video card to play the new Call of Duty game... if you get the low end card that just meets the minimum specs, then in 6 months when you get the newer game and the frame rates are all choppy, you will wish you had gotten the next step up. And when you go buy that card, you will have spent more money than you would have had you just planned for the future and gotten the better card to begin with, right?

    Equate that to your phone. Getting a phone or iPad 2 Mini Retina that just sweaks by today with 1GB of RAM, means that when you want to upgrade to iOS9, you can, but you won't have enough memory to run two apps side by side, etc...

    So I think that all those arguments, are for the most part BS. I think it is part of their marketing strategy...

    Unlike a PC where you con drop in a new video card, a 4GB stick of RAM or a second hard drive on the cheap, you have to go get a whole new device. They put in the minimums to work today, knowing that next year you will want the new OS and features, but the hardware will limit that and so you will run out and drop another $300-$600 on the new device. Wash, rinse, repeat.

    Maybe many of us don't keep devices long enough to make a difference, but the iPad 2 Mini, was slow. I returned it and got the Air 2 and it is very nice, but it too suffers from not having enough RAM.

    I don't want to have to spend another $600 to get a mildly updated Air 3 with the extra 1GB of RAM that this device could have easily had.

    How can someone say that 1GB is enough, when right this minute the only app I have running is the system info app, and just that and the OS itself are taking up 1.15gb, leaving me only 850mb to work with.

    No wonder my Mini was slower than molasses in January... LOL
    11-04-2015 02:55 PM
  20. Xandroid's Avatar
    I am a professional Network analyst and have been in the IT business since my early teens and I utilize all of the platforms that have been posted on this forum (Windows [not RT... who uses RT?], Mac OS, iOS & Android). Here is my opinion, and it doesn't differ much with SquireSCA.

    I use Windows for work and for my servers at home (media, network and file). I use MacOS as my main go-to device (MacBook Pro) for everything (work, entertainment, browsing, etc..). I use Android for my mobile device (LG G4), because it provides the best functionalities of a smartphone and it has the ability to do most of my basic computer chores. Now, I also have an iPad Air 2 and here's why.....

    I needed a mobile device with a bigger screen than my phone, something I could take with me on the go. Another fact about me is that I'm a musician and a songwriter and that greatly impacted my decision to purchase an iPad over an Android device of some kind. I was originally looking at purchasing one of the Asus Transformer Tabs, because of all of their superior functionalities over iOs. I've had an iPad 2 previously and always found myself reaching for a different device because the iPad either couldn't do what I wanted it to do, or it required extra steps to accomplish the task at hand. So for most of the time I found my iPad to be a "glorified eReader", with additional functionalities. Now, within the past few years, the music-making industry has made leaps in the digital world, be it digital mixers or digital machines and amps, etc.. And all of these companies created awesome tools that made me sell my analog heap and convert entirely to digital. I now have a digital rig for my guitar and a digital board for my gigs and studio. Both of those technologies offer configuration apps for iOS, and not for Android. SquireSCA gave you some good advice. Make a list of things that are absolute necessary for you and then compare that with functionalities of the different platforms.
    jessmags and SquireSCA like this.
    11-04-2015 02:56 PM
  21. SquireSCA's Avatar
    I am a professional Network analyst and have been in the IT business since my early teens and I utilize all of the platforms that have been posted on this forum (Windows [not RT... who uses RT?], Mac OS, iOS & Android). Here is my opinion, and it doesn't differ much with SquireSCA.

    I use Windows for work and for my servers at home (media, network and file). I use MacOS as my main go-to device (MacBook Pro) for everything (work, entertainment, browsing, etc..). I use Android for my mobile device (LG G4), because it provides the best functionalities of a smartphone and it has the ability to do most of my basic computer chores. Now, I also have an iPad Air 2 and here's why.....

    I needed a mobile device with a bigger screen than my phone, something I could take with me on the go. Another fact about me is that I'm a musician and a songwriter and that greatly impacted my decision to purchase an iPad over an Android device of some kind. I was originally looking at purchasing one of the Asus Transformer Tabs, because of all of their superior functionalities over iOs. I've had an iPad 2 previously and always found myself reaching for a different device because the iPad either couldn't do what I wanted it to do, or it required extra steps to accomplish the task at hand. So for most of the time I found my iPad to be a "glorified eReader", with additional functionalities. Now, within the past few years, the music-making industry has made leaps in the digital world, be it digital mixers or digital machines and amps, etc.. And all of these companies created awesome tools that made me sell my analog heap and convert entirely to digital. I now have a digital rig for my guitar and a digital board for my gigs and studio. Both of those technologies offer configuration apps for iOS, and not for Android. SquireSCA gave you some good advice. Make a list of things that are absolute necessary for you and then compare that with functionalities of the different platforms.
    Someone agrees with me rather than wanting me to STFU! LOL

    Good post.
    jessmags likes this.
    11-04-2015 02:59 PM
  22. paul.j.nelson's Avatar
    You stated the facts perfectly reasonably, I may not agree fully with all of them as some are down to personal choice (all my media is iTunes based, I don't need to customise the whole UI etc etc). I am a massive Apple fan and user, but I recently sold my iPad Air 2 and replaced it with the i7 Surface Pro 3 as it offers better portability for AutoCAD than my MacBook Pro and I didn't see the need for two tablet devices. The iPad Air 2 was good for a lot of things, but nothing that was exclusive to the iPad. I find my Surface Pro 3 just as capable as a tablet device and even more so when I need it to be.

    It is all down to personal choice and having an informed decision. Some people let their fanboism get in the way of being completely neutral with their advice.
    11-04-2015 03:10 PM
  23. SquireSCA's Avatar
    You stated the facts perfectly reasonably, I may not agree fully with all of them as some are down to personal choice (all my media is iTunes based, I don't need to customise the whole UI etc etc). I am a massive Apple fan and user, but I recently sold my iPad Air 2 and replaced it with the i7 Surface Pro 3 as it offers better portability for AutoCAD than my MacBook Pro and I didn't see the need for two tablet devices. The iPad Air 2 was good for a lot of things, but nothing that was exclusive to the iPad. I find my Surface Pro 3 just as capable as a tablet device and even more so when I need it to be.

    It is all down to personal choice and having an informed decision. Some people let their fanboism get in the way of being completely neutral with their advice.
    Good points. The iPad Air 2 is great at several things, but not any more so than any other device is at those same things.

    However, the battery life is phenomenal... How is the Surface 3? Haven't tried one of those although I have used other Windows tabbed and liked them. I would probably like them better with Win10...
    11-04-2015 03:15 PM
  24. iSRS's Avatar
    SquireSCA did a good job of pointing out some potential flaws, but seem like, to quote Obi-Wan, are true "from a certain point of view" So forgive me for my point by point reply.

    Also, one point to note. Microsoft Office on the iPad you can edit for free because it is under 10" - Food for thought. From the App Description "Sign in with a free Microsoft account to create or edit documents. A qualifying Office 365 subscription is required to unlock the full Office experience, and to access and save documents in OneDrive for Business or SharePoint."

    Couple issues, from someone who is using both.

    1) Screen aspect ratio, as the other guy mentioned. Most HD format is widescreen, so Android lets you use the entire screen for watching video, without cropping. If you watch a lot of movies, this could be a factor. Excellent point

    2) the iPad Air 2 gets insane battery life. I charge it like twice a week and I use it daily. It is that good, and I don't know of anything on the Android side of the tablet world that can touch it.

    3) The iPad will have a lot less options than Android. The OS is not much different than it was in 2007. There is no real desktop environment, no widgets or real time data... just an old slab of icons that you can't really customize, that you can manually launch one at a time... If you care about widgets and live email, message, RSS feeds, weather, music, etc... iOS will leave you wanting. It requires you to determine what you want, go find the appropriate app and manually launch them one at a time. Perhaps I have different needs, but I have an app called Launcher that is my shortcut to tons of things. Not built in, put shortcuts to many options, apps, what have you. Not sure what "no real time data" is referring to, but you may be right, depends on what data you are looking for.

    4) There is no user file system. Each app has it's own sandbox. If you want a file to be opened in more than one app, you need more than one copy of that file, one for each app. Not completely true. There is an iCloud Drive app now. If you use iCloud, you can find a file (still limited by knowing what app it is "designed" for) and open, send, etc. In addition, you don't need more thane copy. Someone sends you a Word Doc, you can choose to open it in Pages, or Word, or other apps you have installed that support it, provided those apps have implemented Share Sheet functionality. Again, not exactly like on a desktop, but more than most think is available.

    5) No simple drag and drop USB functionality. An Advantage of Android is that it is universal, just plug it into a Windows, Linux or MacOS device and it pops up like a thumb drive. Drag and drop all day long, doesn't matter what type of file, no iTunes telling you that you can't transfer that file format, etc...No argument here. Most people think that Apple/iOS relies on iTunes too much, but what it really relies on is the Cloud, specifically iCloud

    6) No expanded storage with Apple. You either couple up $100 more for an extra 32GB that cost apple less than $2 to include, or up your data plan and use cloud storage... Many Android devices have MicroSD slots which can be VERY useful for transporting large files, or housing an extensive multimedia library, installing extra apps, etc... Heck, with a $5 OTG cable I can just plug my 3TB external HD in to my phone or tablet and access it just like a PC would...True on the no expandable storage, but the $100 for 32GB more is not accurate. 64 GB is $100 more than 16 GB, and 128 GB is $100 more than the 64 GB. At Apple MSRP. I just picked up a 64 GB iPad Air 2 for $120 off, making it $479 vs MSRP of $599. Semantics? Absolutely, but needed when trying to provide clear, unbiased information to someone looking for it. As far as data on a USB drive, no real way to do that, unless you by a WiFi enabled HD and that company has an app.

    7) More customization with Android, if that matters to you. There is NONE on Apple devices. Again, semantics, but not NONE, not nearly as flexible as Android, but not none. Think Mac vs Windows on customization.

    8) Apple puts the absolute minimum amount of RAM into their devices as part of their "planned obsolescence" marketing strategy... I had an iPad Mini 2 Retina and had to return it, the 1GB of RAM, not seen in Android in several years, was completely inadequate. Sluggish, constant page reloads when browsing, it just didn't have enough RAM, and as a result the newer features like split screen and multitasking, wouldn't work on it... so that is how they get you to upgrade... I never have bought into this conspiracy theory. Apple products have a much longer "current" status lifespan than their Windows/Android counterparts, as evidenced by a point you make below, their resale value. Apple gets accused of skimping out on specs, but instead builds the OS, and implements limitations on Apps, to provide at least equal, if not better experience wise. As far as older spec'd devices not fully supporting every single new iOS feature, that is true as well, but a 3 year old iPad mini will get updates, can the same be said for any 3 year old Android tablet? Again, possibly a minor point, but the counterpoint to your issue. Also, on older devices? Don't upgrade the OS until the .1 is released. The first release of any iOS upgrade is designed for the current generation and the one about to be announced (i.e. iOS 9 was designed with the iPad Air 2, iPhone 6/6Plus in mind, PLUS the iPad Pro and iPhone 7s/6sPlus that had not been announced yet). THEN they go back in the x.0.1 or x.1 update and improve older device support. Not an official strategy that I know of, but one a few years of evidence supports.
    Dude, just let it go. Owning a phone and actually understanding how it works, are two different things... Just some things off the top of my head over the past several years of owning both platforms...

    1) For a long time, you couldn't copy and paste between apps Yes, 2007-2009, correct
    2) For a long time, you couldn't send pictures or video through MMS, you were forced to use email Yes, 2007-2009, correct
    3) No expandable storage Correct
    4) No customization Limited customization vs Android, yes
    5) Only in the latest iOS 9 are Apple devices finally able to sorta multitask Side by side apps and PIP is sorta?
    6) No widgets or real-time data Limited compared to android and implemented differently, and may need a 3rd party app, ture
    7) After years of Android having a nice notification bar, Apple finally copied it last year. Yes, true. If it matters who had it first, webOS had it in 2008, before android, but I don't think it matters, as the iPad Air 2 ships with iOS 9, shouldn't be an issue.
    8) Long upgrade cycles, every 12-14 months, limited models typically defined by color or the amount of storage, every other update is an incremental update only True, but also a big part of it's success. And isn't this a good thing, vs your "planned obsolescence"? At least you know when you buy it about when the next upgrade will be.
    9) Years behind the time on screen size, the iPhone 6+ finally got with the program, and it was a sales hit!Years behind, sure. But be honest. The first large screen phones were designed to combat poor android battery life with bigger batteries. But, again, not an issue in 2015
    10) Many of their devices come with not enough RAM that slows it down and makes it "incompatible" with some of the new features Opinion, but the older devices still get the benefits of improved performance and security, vs not getting the updates at all in some/many(?) android tablets. Buy a device that does what you want today, not what you want it to do in the future.
    11) Proprietary plugs and cables rather than industry standards True, but the accessory market is larger for iOS, and the cables are everywhere. Also, why did Samsung copy the 30 pin connector if it is so bad?
    12) No ability to use as a standard USB storage device. true
    13) No ability to view alternative video and audio formats... not easily anyway...true, but the major ones are supported
    14) Heavy reliance on iTunes to do anything, which isn't much much less true than it was. More accurate to say heavy reliance on iCloud, to which they only give you 5 GB free per account, not device
    15) Until recently, true HD screens were not on the tablebut they are now
    16) Odd-ball screen resolutions limit screen real estate for watching moviesbut virtually everything else (email, browsers, books, etc) benefits
    17) No ability to select your default apps, you MUST use the Apple approved apps and then copy and paste links over, etc... Asinine...Partially true, but most apps have work arounds in place using the share sheet. All Google Apps default to opening links, etc in the other Google Apps if you have them installed, and THEN the Apple default app. But you are correct, no ability to set Chrome as your default browser, etc.
    18) Plenty of teething issues with Apple MapsAs Google Maps did back in 2005, etc. Most of the "adult teeth" are in now, with regards to Apple Maps. Bonus! Google Maps and Waze are both available in the App Store
    19) No ability to remove and replace a battery, which is nice when you are traveling, or camping, etc... true
    20) No Back Button. They added a "return to Gmail" or whatever button, but it is not the same as being able to back up, no matter what screen you are onAgain, true. But the iPad Air has some multitouch gestures which can do much of this
    21) No seamless integration with the majority of Google services, which is pretty much what the world runs on.I completely disagree. If you are that all in on Google services, you can get all the Google Apps from the App Store, and they will default to each other.
    22) Lack of hardware choices... Android provides different makers, form factors, price points, styles, different features, rugged phones, etc...correctamundo
    23) Apple finally got 4k video 2 years after everyone elseCorrect again. Still haven't used it, but YMMV

    To which you will call me a fanboi, and claim that none of those things matter to you, disregarding the fact that they are absolutely true...I am not, I am simply providing counterpoints to your claims

    And then I will tell you to enjoy your iPhone and STFU and let us get back on topic and answer this woman's request for advice?Which I hope I have offered an equally compelling argument for

    So can we do that, please?
    11-04-2015 03:57 PM
  25. cctpitts01's Avatar
    I did, I just switched both of lines over to the iPhone 6s Plus and have been enjoying it ever since 😀
    jessmags likes this.
    11-05-2015 02:53 PM
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