1. Davyo's Avatar
    Ok,,, so now my brand new Air 2 freezes and buffers during playback of YouTube content while my new Samsung Tab S 10.5 sitting right next to it plays perfectly with no issues, no lag and no buffering.

    I can have both tablets sitting side by side, playing the exact same video at the exact same time, and the Tab S 10.5 works amazingly PERFECTLY while my new Air 2 lags, buffers, freezes and stutters,,,, and will also drop video quality drasticly to a fuzzy blurry picture.

    This happens more than often, I would go so far as to say almost all the time.

    I have tried the iOS TouTube app and also done a straight download from Safarie with just bypassing the iOS app and it made no difference,,, I have also uninstalled and re-installed the YouTube iOS app several times hoping that would fix the problem.

    Anyone have and ideas on a fix for my Air 2,,,,, both tablets are WiFi only and I have a very strong home WiFi signal /connection.

    I have also exchanged my Air 2 several times thinking I might just have a bad iPad,,, that has not made a difference either.

    Thanks for any help in advance.

    Cheers, Davyo
    Last edited by Davyo; 12-25-2014 at 08:09 AM.
    12-25-2014 07:59 AM
  2. kch50428's Avatar
    The wifi hotspot you're connected to could be favoring one vs the other for a whole host of reasons...
    lui22 likes this.
    12-25-2014 10:03 AM
  3. Teemu2's Avatar
    I've found my new iPhone 6 stutters playing back YouTube videos as well. I'm was leaning towards it being an app issue. Disappointing for me too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    12-25-2014 10:27 AM
  4. Orlandorealtor's Avatar
    Have had no problems at all watching youtube videos on my Ipad Air 2.
    Spencerdl likes this.
    12-25-2014 01:05 PM
  5. Flow39's Avatar
    No problems for me as well. No lag here
    Spencerdl likes this.
    12-25-2014 01:51 PM
  6. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    The YouTube app for iOS seems to have some problems.


    Sent from my iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
    12-25-2014 01:57 PM
  7. kch50428's Avatar
    The YouTube app for iOS seems to have some problems.
    You'd think Google would be better at apps for iOS since iOS users account for a huge share of the income Google generates...
    12-25-2014 02:22 PM
  8. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    You'd think Google would be better at apps for iOS since iOS users account for a huge share of the income Google generates...
    Most of their iOS apps are better than their android apps, imo. Some of the popular YouTube tech reviewers share the same opinion. But the YouTube app seems to be the exception.


    Sent from my iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
    Not Quite Right likes this.
    12-25-2014 02:24 PM
  9. lui22's Avatar
    The thing is i think, that the the app works better on android because the people behind youtube and the app are the people behind the OS, so naturally it should work better on a home os. Its like iCloud sync it works better on my iPad than it did on my Q10 and actually works when compared to my Craxus 5
    12-25-2014 08:30 PM
  10. Spencerdl's Avatar
    I have NO PROBLEMS with my Verizon WiFi/Cellular GOLD iPad Air 2. YouTube, Internet, sms, ectera, ectera, works great. The speed is remarkable ......"IT JUST WORKS"
    dcharleyultra likes this.
    12-26-2014 10:20 AM
  11. Speedygi's Avatar
    I found that the Galaxy Tab S my mother has was significantly more laggy than even my iPad 3. For the most part iOS has always been smoother than Android for me.
    12-26-2014 09:44 PM
  12. n8ter#AC's Avatar
    I found that the Galaxy Tab S my mother has was significantly more laggy than even my iPad 3. For the most part iOS has always been smoother than Android for me.
    Android device performance is inconsistent and depends heavily on how they are used.

    A lot of people load up a ton of widgets, apps, etc. and that tends to drag performance down.

    I'm a bit more meticulous with my devices (never keeping an app I don't use OFTEN installed, I never used Widgets and always used only 3 home screens MAX, etc.). As a result I didn't notice a huge difference between Android (TouchWiz) and iOS performance outside of specific apps (Safari is swifter than Samsung's Browser, esp. regarding Animations, and iOS' Camera software (though much simpler, comparatively speaking) was quite a bit faster).

    On the other hand, I've seen people's Note 3's and S4's that were loaded to the hilt, and they performed terribly because of it.

    iOS is certainly more consistent, but I can never subscribe to the thought that Android is laggy in a general sense. It can certainly be made that way, if you use it in a way that introduces issues which cause it.
    Haalcyon likes this.
    01-25-2015 04:48 AM
  13. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    Android device performance is inconsistent and depends heavily on how they are used.

    A lot of people load up a ton of widgets, apps, etc. and that tends to drag performance down.

    I'm a bit more meticulous with my devices (never keeping an app I don't use OFTEN installed, I never used Widgets and always used only 3 home screens MAX, etc.). As a result I didn't notice a huge difference between Android (TouchWiz) and iOS performance outside of specific apps (Safari is swifter than Samsung's Browser, esp. regarding Animations, and iOS' Camera software (though much simpler, comparatively speaking) was quite a bit faster).

    On the other hand, I've seen people's Note 3's and S4's that were loaded to the hilt, and they performed terribly because of it.

    iOS is certainly more consistent, but I can never subscribe to the thought that Android is laggy in a general sense. It can certainly be made that way, if you use it in a way that introduces issues which cause it.
    I don't doubt what you are saying about Android performance not be laggy when you are "meticulous" about maintaining your device, not using widgets, only three home screens, etc. Granted, I'm almost always on the latest iPhone, but I've never seen any laggy behavior and I keep it loaded up with many home screen pages (I think I have about ten at the moment) and with iOS 8, I have many widgets in my Notification Center. I guess I just think you shouldn't have to be "meticulous" with your phone to make it perform well.
    Spencerdl likes this.
    01-25-2015 07:16 AM
  14. doctordwaynewilliams's Avatar
    To the OP, what videos are you watching? Are they subscriptions to a channel? Because I remember that the Android app would download those videos in my subscription automatically so when I went to view them the playback was smoother. The iOS app doesn't do that. I haven't had any real problems with playing YouTube videos in my iPad or iPhone though.
    01-25-2015 07:24 AM
  15. jhnnyblze2000's Avatar
    I personally think it's the YouTube app as well. I just got my air 2 tonight so haven't been able to test it but I have stutter in YouTube as well on my 6 plus. I use the website instead and don't have any issues with the website.
    01-25-2015 06:21 PM
  16. donnation's Avatar
    YouTube for iOS just simply sucks. It stutters and lags for no apparent reason all the time. I've never not had an iOS device that didn't have this problem. In my family we have 2 iPhone 6's, an iPhone 6Plus, an iPad Air 2, 2 iPad mini 3's, and an iPad mini and they all have the exact same problem. Doesn't matter where we are and even happens at home with a blazing fast wifi connection.
    Closingracer likes this.
    01-30-2015 06:37 PM
  17. Closingracer's Avatar
    YouTube for iOS just simply sucks. It stutters and lags for no apparent reason all the time. I've never not had an iOS device that didn't have this problem. In my family we have 2 iPhone 6's, an iPhone 6Plus, an iPad Air 2, 2 iPad mini 3's, and an iPad mini and they all have the exact same problem. Doesn't matter where we are and even happens at home with a blazing fast wifi connection.
    I've had this issue with the iPad Air 2 app but never an issue with the website .


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    02-05-2015 09:34 PM
  18. n8ter#AC's Avatar
    I don't doubt what you are saying about Android performance not be laggy when you are "meticulous" about maintaining your device, not using widgets, only three home screens, etc. Granted, I'm almost always on the latest iPhone, but I've never seen any laggy behavior and I keep it loaded up with many home screen pages (I think I have about ten at the moment) and with iOS 8, I have many widgets in my Notification Center. I guess I just think you shouldn't have to be "meticulous" with your phone to make it perform well.
    Those Home Screen Pages are nothing but Icons and Icon Badges. If all you put on Android Home Screens were Icons and Icon Badges (which Samsung devices do support) it will be swift as hell. I cut mine down to three because I don't want pages and pages of icons and badges. Universal Search and Folders make that a waste of resources on the device...

    The issue is that the Widgets that a lot of them rely on background processes for their updates (otherwise, how will they update?) in addition to being graphically way more complex than they need to be. Also, some of them are a lot more graphically or resource intensive than they seem at first glance, never mind the high resolution graphical assets that may come with them as well (on today's higher resolution screens - unless you like blurry/upscaled graphics).

    Keep in mind that top Android Flagships are running screen resolutions 2-3x that of Apple smartphones, so the amount of rendering those devices have to do is a LOT more than the average iDevice. It's possible that a graphical workload - as it looks on the screen - on an iPhone would be only half (or less) as demanding on the system than equivalent workload on something like a Note 4, because the Note 4 is likely using higher density graphical assets in addition to pushing way more pixels through the GPU than the iPhone. That's something to take in mind, especially when you load up home screens with Widgets of decent complexity.

    You seem to be a bit clueless on what a Notification Widget in iOS is equivalent to. They're equivalent to the small widgets developers can put in Android Notification Bar, and to an extent also the Expandable Notifications that can display there...

    iOS Widgets are not equivalent to Android Home Screen Widgets.

    On Android, I've seen Calendar/Messaging/Browser Favorites/Contacts Widgets that Scroll Almost endlessly. Widgets that Animate (think about it, you're turning the page (basically animating something) while 2-3 widgets on that page are animating). Widgets that rely on background processes to get their updates (so not only are you constantly rendering the widget and its animations, you're also, practically running an app for it in the background 100% of the time). Some people load tons of widget toggles, etc. on their home screens "for convenience."

    You cannot even compare iOS Notification Center Widgets, which are no more demanding than some of the Expandable Notifications on Android, to the Home Screen Widgets on that platform - except they take a lot less power to render due to the devices having such low screen resolution (comparatively speaking). It's apples and oranges.

    Maybe meticulous is a bad word, but none of what I said sounds like work. It sounds like common sense.

    Stuff that you don't use actively, or doesn't offer any real boost to usability and productivity... What's the point. Other than to say "Look what I can do."

    If you put nothing but Icons and Folders on a Galaxy S5 or Note 3's Home Screens and only used Pull-Down Widgets (which Android does support), the phone wouldn't even come close to lagging.

    What an iPhone does, would never bottleneck a recent Android flagship. The issues come from the "extra stuff" in the platform that people "abuse" (quotes cause I'm using that word quite loosely) as well as people not really being informed of what the consequences of it may be.

    iOS has rudimentary multi-tasking so many people come from the iPhone to Android with "App Hoarder" tendencies but have no clue that "App Hoarding" is bad on Android. It's not really a platform issue, it's a developer issue. I've seen many Android apps that run continuously for no reason other than "because we can."
    03-18-2015 02:32 AM
  19. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    WhateverI've never seen a screenshot of an Android home screen that I thought looked good. So, in my opinion, putting widgets on the home screen is a "no go". Each to their own though. After all, only I need to like my phone's home screens and only you need to like yours.
    hydrogen3 and Ledsteplin like this.
    03-18-2015 07:41 AM
  20. WordPainter's Avatar
    I have no problems watching YouTube vids with with my iPad Air 2 LTE (T-Mobile).
    05-04-2015 10:04 PM
  21. Mr.Willie's Avatar
    I use the web browser on my Air 2. No problems. I also have Video Tube installed that works fine, but I mainly use Safari.
    05-11-2015 04:14 PM
  22. SquireSCA's Avatar
    Those Home Screen Pages are nothing but Icons and Icon Badges. If all you put on Android Home Screens were Icons and Icon Badges (which Samsung devices do support) it will be swift as hell. I cut mine down to three because I don't want pages and pages of icons and badges. Universal Search and Folders make that a waste of resources on the device...

    The issue is that the Widgets that a lot of them rely on background processes for their updates (otherwise, how will they update?) in addition to being graphically way more complex than they need to be. Also, some of them are a lot more graphically or resource intensive than they seem at first glance, never mind the high resolution graphical assets that may come with them as well (on today's higher resolution screens - unless you like blurry/upscaled graphics).

    Keep in mind that top Android Flagships are running screen resolutions 2-3x that of Apple smartphones, so the amount of rendering those devices have to do is a LOT more than the average iDevice. It's possible that a graphical workload - as it looks on the screen - on an iPhone would be only half (or less) as demanding on the system than equivalent workload on something like a Note 4, because the Note 4 is likely using higher density graphical assets in addition to pushing way more pixels through the GPU than the iPhone. That's something to take in mind, especially when you load up home screens with Widgets of decent complexity.

    You seem to be a bit clueless on what a Notification Widget in iOS is equivalent to. They're equivalent to the small widgets developers can put in Android Notification Bar, and to an extent also the Expandable Notifications that can display there...

    iOS Widgets are not equivalent to Android Home Screen Widgets.

    On Android, I've seen Calendar/Messaging/Browser Favorites/Contacts Widgets that Scroll Almost endlessly. Widgets that Animate (think about it, you're turning the page (basically animating something) while 2-3 widgets on that page are animating). Widgets that rely on background processes to get their updates (so not only are you constantly rendering the widget and its animations, you're also, practically running an app for it in the background 100% of the time). Some people load tons of widget toggles, etc. on their home screens "for convenience."

    You cannot even compare iOS Notification Center Widgets, which are no more demanding than some of the Expandable Notifications on Android, to the Home Screen Widgets on that platform - except they take a lot less power to render due to the devices having such low screen resolution (comparatively speaking). It's apples and oranges.

    Maybe meticulous is a bad word, but none of what I said sounds like work. It sounds like common sense.

    Stuff that you don't use actively, or doesn't offer any real boost to usability and productivity... What's the point. Other than to say "Look what I can do."

    If you put nothing but Icons and Folders on a Galaxy S5 or Note 3's Home Screens and only used Pull-Down Widgets (which Android does support), the phone wouldn't even come close to lagging.

    What an iPhone does, would never bottleneck a recent Android flagship. The issues come from the "extra stuff" in the platform that people "abuse" (quotes cause I'm using that word quite loosely) as well as people not really being informed of what the consequences of it may be.

    iOS has rudimentary multi-tasking so many people come from the iPhone to Android with "App Hoarder" tendencies but have no clue that "App Hoarding" is bad on Android. It's not really a platform issue, it's a developer issue. I've seen many Android apps that run continuously for no reason other than "because we can."
    Exactly. I love my iPad 2 as a premium media consumption device. But iOS is archaic. No real multitasking, limited, and it doesn't look or work much different than my iPhone 3G did back in the day.

    It's just a wallpaper with icons on it, that you can manually launch one at a time. It had BETTER me smooth, as it isn't doing anything most of the time.

    Android is light years ahead of iOS in that regard. real time widgets with email, contacts, communications, news feeds, all sorts of stuff so that I can get the data that I want, as I want it at a glance, rather than having to sit there loading up 5 apps, one at a time, one after the other.

    Hell, I can have two apps open on the screen at once, reading a spreadsheet while typing an email to my boss concerning that excel spreadsheet, etc...

    Apple also is stingy with the RAM. 1GB of RAM when bought in bulk, is about $1 USD. So why limit devices to 1 or 2GB on a "premium" device?

    I sorta prefer the iPad for a general tablet that just works, despite its many shortcomings... the OS, the reliance on iTunes, the lack of an SD slot, proprietary power plug, no HDMI port, inability to plug into any PC and act as a USB thumb drive to transport files, the list goes on.

    What it does do, it does very well, and it is clean and elegant.

    Android is for power users who want customizating and want a device that conforms to their way of working, who want more options than "black, white or silver"...

    And app hoarding, I like that term, and yeah, I see that a lot with some folks... I have maybe 20 apps installed. I see people with screen after screen of all these inane apps, and then they wonder why their phone slows down...

    A BMW 335i is a great, quick and great handling car. But if you just load it down with 1000lbs of bricks in the trunk, attach a trailer to the back of it and then throw 4 of your buddies in there and expect it to not impact performance, you are in for a rude awakening.

    The iPad is like a Smart car. You have room for 1 medium sized friend and that's it. You don't have the option of any of the other stuff, so you don't have to worry about the performance dropping because it won't do much outside of the narrow scope that it was designed for...
    05-31-2015 10:40 AM

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