1. dkhmwilliams's Avatar
    I can completely understand why a person would like Android. I have had many Android devices and they have served me well. My favorite two Android devices were the Note 3 and the Nexus 5. I haven't really had any issues that were Android related. And for younger generations, I can definitely see the appeal for Android. For me, I'm sticking with iOS for now because I need devices and an ecosystem that is easy, convenient, and reliable. I have found Apple products to exhibit all of these qualities. I won't be switching back to Android unless something terribly wrong happens to iOS and Apple hardware.


    Sent from my iPad Air. Simply better than the rest.
    07-24-2014 09:38 PM
  2. Speedygi's Avatar
    Haha everytime I see these kind of threads on here I'm reminded how Apple is NOT doomed...
    07-24-2014 09:58 PM
  3. blackguard's Avatar
    I can completely understand why a person would like Android. I have had many Android devices and they have served me well. My favorite two Android devices were the Note 3 and the Nexus 5. I haven't really had any issues that were Android related. And for younger generations, I can definitely see the appeal for Android. For me, I'm sticking with iOS for now because I need devices and an ecosystem that is easy, convenient, and reliable. I have found Apple products to exhibit all of these qualities. I won't be switching back to Android unless something terribly wrong happens to iOS and Apple hardware.


    Sent from my iPad Air. Simply better than the rest.
    I'm currently and android user but we have a 5s and mini retina in the house. You know what stands out to me a lot? I scroll the unread posts at AC and imore on Tapatalk every day. This is what I see on AC:

    problem with...
    Having issues with...
    (insert whatever here) not working...

    At imore there's hardly any of those posts. I have to confess that bothers me a little in general even though my own phone (Sony) is doing well in that respect.

    Another thing I've noticed is that over time my app cache will eventually start bogging my phone down until I clear it. Wife and kid go months with no performance hit on their 5s
    the_tech_eater and FFR like this.
    07-25-2014 11:16 AM
  4. Some Random Bloke's Avatar
    An eloquent post. Having used Android for work for a couple of months now (Nexus 5) I have become a confirmed iOS user. But if your mileage varies, go for it.
    07-26-2014 01:02 AM
  5. natasftw's Avatar
    You are comparing apples to oranges.
    Every complaint I have ever heard about iOS was based on an old iOS (you), or it was operator error (maybe you again).

    Once you have to actually work for a living, you dont have all day to sit around and customize your phone.

    Apple is unmatched for art and music.....also 64 bit processing.

    Good luck with your downgrade.
    64-bit processing is a marketing feature. The device isn't setup to take advantage of the processing. You're only marginally, if anything, better off than a 32-bit processor. In terms of upgrading/downgrading, that has absolutely nothing to do with the conversation.

    Once you have to work for a living, you should consider researching your decisions before using the money you're making on your decisions. That, or you should just lose the condescending tone if you're going to show you don't really understand what you're talking about. Either way works.
    07-26-2014 11:14 PM
  6. FFR's Avatar
    64-bit processing is a marketing feature. The device isn't setup to take advantage of the processing. You're only marginally, if anything, better off than a 32-bit processor. In terms of upgrading/downgrading, that has absolutely nothing to do with the conversation.

    Once you have to work for a living, you should consider researching your decisions before using the money you're making on your decisions. That, or you should just lose the condescending tone if you're going to show you don't really understand what you're talking about. Either way works.
    Your factually incorrect.
    Perhaps on android it's a gimmick, but not with apple, and he is right enjoy your downgrade.
    07-27-2014 04:09 AM
  7. dkhmwilliams's Avatar
    I'm currently and android user but we have a 5s and mini retina in the house. You know what stands out to me a lot? I scroll the unread posts at AC and imore on Tapatalk every day. This is what I see on AC:

    problem with...
    Having issues with...
    (insert whatever here) not working...

    At imore there's hardly any of those posts. I have to confess that bothers me a little in general even though my own phone (Sony) is doing well in that respect.

    Another thing I've noticed is that over time my app cache will eventually start bogging my phone down until I clear it. Wife and kid go months with no performance hit on their 5s
    I completely agree with this. It has been something that I have noticed for quite some time too. I good chunk of the posts on Apple forums are about accessories. Or whether it is worth upgrading to the next product in the line. But you don't hear about a lot of issues with device hardware or software. On Android forums, they are rampant with complaints and workarounds. For a long time, it was getting exhausting that for many of the complaints the general answer would be to root your phone or use another launcher.


    Sent from my iPad Air. Simply better than the rest.
    07-27-2014 04:19 AM
  8. JmBApps's Avatar
    64-bit processing is a marketing feature. The device isn't setup to take advantage of the processing. You're only marginally, if anything, better off than a 32-bit processor. In terms of upgrading/downgrading, that has absolutely nothing to do with the conversation.

    Once you have to work for a living, you should consider researching your decisions before using the money you're making on your decisions. That, or you should just lose the condescending tone if you're going to show you don't really understand what you're talking about. Either way works.
    Once I work for a living? I like how you pulled that out of thin air. Im 45, I develop for reals, I doubt you know the difference between a byte and a bit. I state the facts....sorry if the truth upsets you. I mention the 64 bit as a reason that he should stay with Apple. That is what he stated in his original post, reasons why he should stay. I gave him a reason, superior processing. Get it now? Perhaps you should step out of your delusional state...and worry about you. Im good over here. Thx for your concern.
    07-27-2014 12:37 PM
  9. blackguard's Avatar
    Apps will eventually reach the 64 bit stage. It's inevitable. It's silly to actually criticize apple for doing something proactive just because it's not here right now. How exactly would you suggest developers work on them without the hardware? Build their own phone in the garage?
    07-27-2014 01:54 PM
  10. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    64-bit processing is a marketing feature. The device isn't setup to take advantage of the processing. You're only marginally, if anything, better off than a 32-bit processor. In terms of upgrading/downgrading, that has absolutely nothing to do with the conversation.

    Once you have to work for a living, you should consider researching your decisions before using the money you're making on your decisions. That, or you should just lose the condescending tone if you're going to show you don't really understand what you're talking about. Either way works.
    If that's so, please explain why there are very very few android flagships that benchmarks and performs better than the 5S! I mean, the note three has THREE TIMES the RAM, double the cores, and I believe double the clock speed, and the 5S still beats it in benchmarks and real world performance! Want to say 64-bit is a marketing gimmick again? 99% smartphones purchasers don't have a clue what 64-bit even means, so how could it be a marketing gimmick when most people wouldn't have a clue what 64-bit means??? You want to know what the marketing gimmick is? Packing these android phones with 3GB of ram, 2+ghz clock speeds and 4+ cores!
    Les74, FFR and mikeo007 like this.
    07-27-2014 08:23 PM
  11. FFR's Avatar
    Apps will eventually reach the 64 bit stage. It's inevitable. It's silly to actually criticize apple for doing something proactive just because it's not here right now. How exactly would you suggest developers work on them without the hardware? Build their own phone in the garage?
    iOS apps Have been 64 bit since the debut of iOS 7 and xcode 5.
    07-28-2014 02:48 AM
  12. natasftw's Avatar
    Your factually incorrect.
    Perhaps on android it's a gimmick, but not with apple, and he is right enjoy your downgrade.
    I'm factually correct. I suppose I'll educate you as well. The biggest gain you'll see from going from a 32-bit to a 64-bit processor is in memory addressability. The iPhone comes with 2GB of RAM that you're unable to upgrade. You can address 2GB of RAM with the 32-bit processor.

    It has nothing to do with Android or Apple. You're letting your choices blur your vision. I'm sorry you chose to join the condescending behavior when you know nothing about the topic. Next time, don't be fooled by marketing gimmicks and you won't feel the need to defend your emotional responses the marketing. You certainly weren't acting rationally when you believed the 64-bit processor meant much of anything nor were you when you made this post.
    07-28-2014 07:45 PM
  13. natasftw's Avatar
    Once I work for a living? I like how you pulled that out of thin air. Im 45, I develop for reals, I doubt you know the difference between a byte and a bit. I state the facts....sorry if the truth upsets you. I mention the 64 bit as a reason that he should stay with Apple. That is what he stated in his original post, reasons why he should stay. I gave him a reason, superior processing. Get it now? Perhaps you should step out of your delusional state...and worry about you. Im good over here. Thx for your concern.

    Thin air? You suggested you are ignorant until you work for a living. You were entirely ignorant in your post. By your logic, that means you haven't worked for a living.

    The truth doesn't upset me. Your ignorance does. I explained to someone else what the biggest benefit of the 64-bit processor is. It's not utilized in the iPhone 5s and cannot be utilized. As such, the "superior processing" isn't superior. I'll try to explain it in a way you'll understand. If you have a car that CAN travel 100mph, but you put a limiter on it to prevent it from going faster than 50mph, you can't reasonably claim it's faster than a car that travels 50mph. The hardware decisions Apple made mitigate the potential benefit of the 64-bit processor. Educate yourself and stop being so easy for marketing.
    07-28-2014 07:48 PM
  14. natasftw's Avatar
    If that's so, please explain why there are very very few android flagships that benchmarks and performs better than the 5S! I mean, the note three has THREE TIMES the RAM, double the cores, and I believe double the clock speed, and the 5S still beats it in benchmarks and real world performance! Want to say 64-bit is a marketing gimmick again? 99% smartphones purchasers don't have a clue what 64-bit even means, so how could it be a marketing gimmick when most people wouldn't have a clue what 64-bit means??? You want to know what the marketing gimmick is? Packing these android phones with 3GB of ram, 2+ghz clock speeds and 4+ cores!
    Let's work through that post in pieces. We'll start with the easiest first. Most people don't know what 3G and 4G are either. But, marketing certainly uses that and takes advantage of people believing a larger number has meaning. Are you aware marketing teams went to 3GPP begging to get the 4G standard changed so they could call LTE 4G even though it fails to meet 4G specs? Purchasers don't NEED to know what it means. Marketing works better when they don't know what it means. That's why marketing was quick to use the larger number to suggest a superior product.

    The harder of your two questions relates to benchmarks. I'm going to point something out to you that you've apparently missed. The benchmark tests didn't change with the 5s. Apple devices have always performed better with weaker hardware than their competing devices. With that in mind, you shouldn't assume it's the 64-bit processor making the difference. The difference existed prior to the 64-bit processor. It's asinine to believe the processor makes the difference when the difference existed prior to the usage of the processor. The difference is the software and hardware were built to work together. iOS is optimized to Apples devices. Android is meant to work on a wide range of devices. There's a concept that extends beyond electronics that suggests the more things you do, the less you do well. You can't truly focus on being strong at any given task when your focus is spread over a larger number of tasks. Samsung is looking into releasing their own OS so they can reap the benefits of software optimized to work on their devices.

    Yes. I will say it's a marketing gimmick. You're not getting a great deal of op-codes out of the 64-bit processor to improve performance. The addressability of memory isn't being utilized in a device with 2GB of RAM. Would you like to spend a few minutes to research on how a 64-bit processor improves performance over its 32-bit counterpart before you make another silly post?
    07-28-2014 07:56 PM
  15. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    Let's work through that post in pieces. We'll start with the easiest first. Most people don't know what 3G and 4G are either. But, marketing certainly uses that and takes advantage of people believing a larger number has meaning. Are you aware marketing teams went to 3GPP begging to get the 4G standard changed so they could call LTE 4G even though it fails to meet 4G specs? Purchasers don't NEED to know what it means. Marketing works better when they don't know what it means. That's why marketing was quick to use the larger number to suggest a superior product.

    The harder of your two questions relates to benchmarks. I'm going to point something out to you that you've apparently missed. The benchmark tests didn't change with the 5s. Apple devices have always performed better with weaker hardware than their competing devices. With that in mind, you shouldn't assume it's the 64-bit processor making the difference. The difference existed prior to the 64-bit processor. It's asinine to believe the processor makes the difference when the difference existed prior to the usage of the processor. The difference is the software and hardware were built to work together. iOS is optimized to Apples devices. Android is meant to work on a wide range of devices. There's a concept that extends beyond electronics that suggests the more things you do, the less you do well. You can't truly focus on being strong at any given task when your focus is spread over a larger number of tasks. Samsung is looking into releasing their own OS so they can reap the benefits of software optimized to work on their devices.

    Yes. I will say it's a marketing gimmick. You're not getting a great deal of op-codes out of the 64-bit processor to improve performance. The addressability of memory isn't being utilized in a device with 2GB of RAM. Would you like to spend a few minutes to research on how a 64-bit processor improves performance over its 32-bit counterpart before you make another silly post?
    I have researched it. It's you that needs to research before you make another silly post! Yes 64-bit works best with 4GB+ ram, but it's basically like this: if you had 32 people to work for you, they couldn't get it done as fast as 64. Thats exactly how it works with 32vs64bit. Add more floating point registers that are in the A7, and it's the most powerful chip on the market!
    http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinio...chip-explained
    FFR likes this.
    07-28-2014 08:05 PM
  16. natasftw's Avatar
    I have researched it. It's you that needs to research before you make another silly post! Yes 64-bit works best with 4GB+ ram, but it's basically like this: if you had 32 people to work for you, they couldn't get it done as fast as 64. Thats exactly how it works with 32vs64bit. Add more floating point registers that are in the A7, and it's the most powerful chip on the market!
    What is 64-bit? iPhone 5S A7 chip explained - Opinion - Trusted Reviews
    No. It's not. You're confusing processing speed versus the processing resolution. If you have a 2GHz processor, that processes at twice the speed of a 1GHz processor. That's the analogy you gave with 32 people instead of 64.

    Most of that article was poorly written. Long-term, the move to 64 bit does make sense. Eventually, they'll be using the appropriate hardware to leverage the device. Let's give you an analogy, as you seem to like those. Eventually, it makes sense to get married. That doesn't mean it makes sense to propose to the girl on the first date. Adding the 64-bit processor prior to including the hardware to take advantage of the architecture is no different. You're not taking advantage of the single most beneficial aspect of the processor. The rest of the gains are marginal.

    Don't attempt to tell me I'm being silly when you don't understand that processing speed is what makes an opcode complete faster.
    07-28-2014 08:43 PM
  17. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    No. It's not. You're confusing processing speed versus the processing resolution. If you have a 2GHz processor, that processes at twice the speed of a 1GHz processor. That's the analogy you gave with 32 people instead of 64.

    Most of that article was poorly written. Long-term, the move to 64 bit does make sense. Eventually, they'll be using the appropriate hardware to leverage the device. Let's give you an analogy, as you seem to like those. Eventually, it makes sense to get married. That doesn't mean it makes sense to propose to the girl on the first date. Adding the 64-bit processor prior to including the hardware to take advantage of the architecture is no different. You're not taking advantage of the single most beneficial aspect of the processor. The rest of the gains are marginal.

    Don't attempt to tell me I'm being silly when you don't understand that processing speed is what makes an opcode complete faster.
    You are being silly. And quite frankly I don't want to argue with you, because that would be bringing myself down to your level.
    07-28-2014 08:44 PM
  18. finn5975's Avatar
    Sorry iOS, I'm switching to Android-imageuploadedbyimore-forums1406598390.167247.jpg


    Sent from my iPhone using iMore Forums
    Beyond Fire, Just_Me_D and cwbcpa like this.
    07-28-2014 09:46 PM
  19. natasftw's Avatar
    You are being silly. And quite frankly I don't want to argue with you, because that would be bringing myself down to your level.
    After you made the mistake of telling me 64-bit processors make the change that increasing the processing speed makes, I'd take a cheap shot and leave the discussion too. I'm being "silly" by understanding the topic. Nobody makes the claim that a 64-bit processor handles the task at twice the rate of its 32-bit counterpart other than you. With such a weak foundation of knowledge, I wouldn't want to argue if I were you either.

    You can't bring yourself down to my level. You don't know enough about the topic to do so. You've used inaccurate analogies to attempt to explain a concept you don't understand to someone with an engineering degree. The one article you linked used some bad ideas along with some good information. You aren't educated on the topic enough to know which pieces are which. Adding more hardware simply because we will eventually make use of that hardware isn't a good decision making process for the CURRENT product. We've agreed there is a maximum RAM that a processor can use. Would it make sense to add more RAM to the 32-bit processor because eventually we'll be using that much RAM with a 64-bit processor even though the device wouldn't be utilizing the increase in RAM? Of course not. Yet, you're telling me I'm being silly for pointing out this decision making process doesn't make sense.

    Speed of a processor isn't measured in bits. It's measured in Hz. A 1GHz processor completes an cycle in 1 billionth of a second. A 2GHz processor completes the same cycle in half the time. This translates to your analogy. Twice the people can perform the task in half the time. Twice the processor speed can perform the same task in half the time. That same comparison simply doesn't translate between 32-bit and 64-bit processing. You confused what you read to mean something it didn't. Yes, you can combine calculations by doing twice as many calculations at once. But, that makes sense in a pipeline. If the calculations aren't pipelined, you're not gaining the performance increase you believe you're gaining. Pipelining typically takes place for portions of code, not the entire code. You'll see a performance increase, but only in a some portions of the code. You have more room for opcodes that can be used to optimize processes and reduce the number of cycles required for each opcode. For example, there are multiply opcodes that can perform at better rates than others depending on the processor. Some may take 1 cycle, some may take 2, some may take 10. This can show performance gain.

    But, the greatest gain STILL comes from the increased addressability.

    Don't argue. It simply doesn't make sense for you to do so. In a technical conversation, you're in a place to learn rather than argue. Take advantage of the free education you were just given. Don't begin to act like you deserve to be condescending until you're able to analyze the articles you're linking and understand what points are misleading and which have merit.
    07-28-2014 10:04 PM
  20. HAWK's Avatar



    One of my coworkers has the new Galaxy. Her phone doesn't charge with the standard charger either. If this is something that is actually important to you, rather than a talking point, you might want to take a look at that before you buy. There are other Android options available. Although, why is this important? Buying a cable isn't any different than buying a cable. Both are popular cables and easy to get your hands on when you need one.


    Go after the device that makes you happy. Just, don't talk yourself into it.
    That old galaxy charger works in the new galaxy just the new charger takes up more room. You can still use standard micro USB on the right hand side to charge it.
    07-29-2014 12:46 AM
  21. the_tech_eater's Avatar
    After you made the mistake of telling me 64-bit processors make the change that increasing the processing speed makes, I'd take a cheap shot and leave the discussion too. I'm being "silly" by understanding the topic. Nobody makes the claim that a 64-bit processor handles the task at twice the rate of its 32-bit counterpart other than you. With such a weak foundation of knowledge, I wouldn't want to argue if I were you either.

    You can't bring yourself down to my level. You don't know enough about the topic to do so. You've used inaccurate analogies to attempt to explain a concept you don't understand to someone with an engineering degree. The one article you linked used some bad ideas along with some good information. You aren't educated on the topic enough to know which pieces are which. Adding more hardware simply because we will eventually make use of that hardware isn't a good decision making process for the CURRENT product. We've agreed there is a maximum RAM that a processor can use. Would it make sense to add more RAM to the 32-bit processor because eventually we'll be using that much RAM with a 64-bit processor even though the device wouldn't be utilizing the increase in RAM? Of course not. Yet, you're telling me I'm being silly for pointing out this decision making process doesn't make sense.

    Speed of a processor isn't measured in bits. It's measured in Hz. A 1GHz processor completes an cycle in 1 billionth of a second. A 2GHz processor completes the same cycle in half the time. This translates to your analogy. Twice the people can perform the task in half the time. Twice the processor speed can perform the same task in half the time. That same comparison simply doesn't translate between 32-bit and 64-bit processing. You confused what you read to mean something it didn't. Yes, you can combine calculations by doing twice as many calculations at once. But, that makes sense in a pipeline. If the calculations aren't pipelined, you're not gaining the performance increase you believe you're gaining. Pipelining typically takes place for portions of code, not the entire code. You'll see a performance increase, but only in a some portions of the code. You have more room for opcodes that can be used to optimize processes and reduce the number of cycles required for each opcode. For example, there are multiply opcodes that can perform at better rates than others depending on the processor. Some may take 1 cycle, some may take 2, some may take 10. This can show performance gain.

    But, the greatest gain STILL comes from the increased addressability.

    Don't argue. It simply doesn't make sense for you to do so. In a technical conversation, you're in a place to learn rather than argue. Take advantage of the free education you were just given. Don't begin to act like you deserve to be condescending until you're able to analyze the articles you're linking and understand what points are misleading and which have merit.
    If clock speed is what matters, than why is the A7 faster than processors with more than double the clock speed? And also, the A7 is only .2 ghz faster than that A6 and it benchmarks, and in a lot of cases performs better than the A6. Care you explain that smarty?
    FFR likes this.
    07-29-2014 01:35 PM
  22. HAWK's Avatar
    Enjoy android. I have a galaxy s5 as well as an iPhone 5s. Both are great
    cbobb123 likes this.
    07-29-2014 03:57 PM
  23. natasftw's Avatar
    If clock speed is what matters, than why is the A7 faster than processors with more than double the clock speed? And also, the A7 is only .2 ghz faster than that A6 and it benchmarks, and in a lot of cases performs better than the A6. Care you explain that smarty?
    You're confusing two ideas. There's obviously more to a processor than purely clock speed. I was explaining from within the context of your analogy. If you don't understand the difference between clock speed and bits, there's no point getting into more complex systems. I'm not attempting to suggest clock cycle is the only measure of a processor's efficiency. I'm just not overstating the value of a 64-bit processor compared to its 32-bit counterpart.

    If everything else remains equal, doubling a processor's clock speed doubles its ability to compute data. If you take a 1GHz processor and the only change is to increase it to a 2GHz processor, tasks take half the time.

    If everything else remains equal, doubling the bits from 32 to 64 increases the processing speed of some calculations while providing absolutely no benefit to others. Take the idea of a Multiply/Accumulate calculation. This is something like y = a(x+z). If the processor is built to include an opcode just for the MAC, it's possible to make this a single cycle calculation. If not, it's going to take however long the processor requires to process both the add and the multiply. It doesn't matter if the processor is 32 or 64 bits. Why? Until the x+z is added, the result can't be multiplied. Sure, you can do more addition functions at a time by utilizing the larger address space. But, you wouldn't in this case. Practically, it's not possible to pipeline every instruction you give in such a way as to gain twice the processing power from the extended size as you suggest.

    The three most common ways to leverage a 64-bit device to gain processing power are: more space for streamlined op-codes, more simultaneous calculations, more RAM addressability.

    We've already addressed simultaneous calculations to some extent. This is very specific to the application being used to benchmark. In some, it may appear to be a huge difference. In others, you're unlikely to see a change. Different applications have different degrees of pipelining used in their design. As an example of pipelining, let's say you have a collection of savings account information and it's time to compute interest. Every account needs to be multiplied by 1.03. If the multiply takes two cycles, you can start computing on the first account during the first cycle. After the first cycle's work is finished, you can finish it in the second cycle while doing the first cycle's work on the second account in the second cycle. This organization means you can do 1,000,000 accounts in 1,000,001 cycles instead of 2,000,000. Depending on the registers being used to do this, it's possible to leverage the 64-bit processor to decrease the time. But, that's not keeping all things the same. That's making additional hardware decisions. It's likely these decisions would be included. But, they'd STILL only see a benefit in these types of cases. When you're not doing a large number of similar calculations immediately following each other, you're not going to see the benefit.

    In terms of op-codes, let's look at the most basic architecture. We'll use an 8-bit architecture and we can expand the idea from there. With each address being a byte in size, we have 8 possible positions to include all of the information the processor needs to handle the instruction. Let's use 3 of those bits for op-codes and the remaining 5 for register addressing. This is an arbitrary decision. You can choose however you'd like. With only 8-bits, we're severely restricted on space. 3-bits for op-codes mean we can handle 8 different instructions. That's not a very advanced system. With 5-bits for addressing, we'd likely split the space into 3 sections: 1 bit to determine which register to save the result, 2-bits for each register to use in the calculation. With only 8 possible commands, we likely don't have room for add, subtract, multiply, and divide. That would use half of our available commands. If we also include save/load, we're at 6. This means we can't include and, or, and not. We could get away with just using AND and NOT, but that's it. We also only have one type of save/load, so it's not very efficient. It's easy to see how the 8-bit space restricts us. If we expand to 16-bits, we can extend the op-code space to 4 bits, double our op-codes, and increase the efficiency of our program by opening up a great deal more possibilities for placement of data. We can further extend this to 32-bits. At this point, we see a lot of architectures using the idea of byte addressability. At this point, we consider the value of having EVERY instruction maintaining the same length. If I want to OR two locations, I need the op-code space, the two locations, and a place to store the result. That could require more bits to explain than something like an unconditional branch. The branch just needs to say "go to this address no matter what." It's the op-code and an offset. This style allows you to pack more instructions into the same space. At this point, we already have a large number of op-codes available. While the 64-bit processor can easily spare a single bit to double the op-codes, this also requires building streamlined operations for each. That's a HUGE investment in research and development for negligible performance improvement. It's not practical at this degree.

    Most users understand that more RAM offers faster potential processing. The reason it offers quicker processing relates to the time it takes to get information. Let's use the analogy of cooking preparation. You're going to make beef stew. You'll need to cut some beef, carrots, potatoes, and celery. You'll also need to mix spices and other ingredients into the pot. It takes less time to cut the carrots if they're already on the table in front of you than if you have to walk across the kitchen to get them out of the fridge. RAM works a lot like this. It keeps the data closer to the processor. As a result, it speeds up computation. More bits means you can have more ingredients on the table, but only if you have enough table space to accommodate the added ingredients. Going from 32-bit to 64-bit without increasing your RAM completely ignores this benefit. You can have more ingredients, but your table is the same size.

    Many processors use these ideas to specialize. A processor used primarily for Digital Signal Processing will want to include measures to make the FFT faster to compute. It makes sense to set aside registers, create butterfly architecture, and use op-codes to reduce the time it takes to compute each butterfly. If the end user isn't likely to be building these types of applications, they may not use the FFT as often. As such, it doesn't make sense to devote this much attention to the calculation. We could benchmark two processors side by side and use the FFT as our application and find one processor to be far superior to the other. But, that doesn't mean it processes that much faster than the other. There are countless decisions like this one that go into designing a processor. If I were to make the B1 processor for DSP and skip the FFT streamlining, I could make a HUGE improvement to the B2 by adding this streamlining. This is true even if I don't change the bits, clock speed, or anything else. You can't simply ask "why does this processor have a faster clock rate and perform better?" The answer isn't that simple.

    It's adorable you're STILL acting condescending when it's beyond apparent you have absolutely NO clue what the discussion is about. Do you have any more questions that you'd like to ask with a condescending tone while simultaneously highlighting your ignorance in this topic?
    08-03-2014 09:03 PM
  24. fatema2014's Avatar
    how to post in imore forums
    08-05-2014 03:46 AM
  25. ajl's Avatar
    how to post in imore forums
    I believe you just did..?
    08-05-2014 04:01 AM
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