1. mecie's Avatar
    Im interested on creating an app.And i need some help on how to start with the coding etc,I was trying to understand how the objective c works but it's like chinese.Does any developer can give me a link explaining it ?
    09-01-2011 09:04 PM
  2. DanSilov's Avatar
    Do you have any development experience at all? If not, start with some general guides on the subject - how programs work, how you make programs with the code, what are main code constructions that you will find in any programming language.

    Then you need to understand data types, arrays, strings, etc. And eventually you need read about objective oriented programming paradigm. It may sound complex, but it's not (at least on a surface).

    While you reading all this you can pick up a few guides on Objective-C and check early examples. You will be able to match some of the stuff you read to Objective-C code constructions.

    The last part would be coming up with a simple (very important to keep it simple in the beginning) application idea and start applying your newfound knowledge.
    09-04-2011 02:27 PM
  3. TamnoLice's Avatar
    I learned objective-C with some book. There are some good books that teach you how to create your first app. Apress has some good titles like "Beginning iPhone Development".
    09-04-2011 02:36 PM
  4. DanSilov's Avatar
    Well, there are books that can guide you through your first steps. But online guides do it faster and much more effective, since you can download demo code, try it out as you read, and so on.

    Books can be good for some advanced techniques, for something that is not that trivial.
    09-04-2011 02:44 PM
  5. LittleBitStudio's Avatar
    Hi Mecie, personally, I'd direct you in different directions depending on the type of app you're wanting to create. Here's a couple IF scenarios as quick and dirty advice, hope something in it is helpful.

    If you're looking to create a tradition iOS UI styled application, you're probably going to want to learn AppKit which is strongly organized around the MVC design patterns like most of the Apple frameworks.

    If you're doing something sprite based and want to stay with obj-c, you can skip much of the details about AppKit and try a tool like Cocos2d which is free. This is what I've been using lately myself.

    If you're doing something sprite based with graphics in 2d and you're not fluent in obj-c, you can always check out tools like Corona SDK which uses a simpler LUA scripting and targets iOS and Android both. It has an easier learning curve but is designed more for gaming and such with 2d graphics, physics, etc. I think this is something like $100 or $300 depending on which one you get.

    If you're looking at a more advance game in 3d or even in 2d, Unity is an option. Its targets many platforms including iOS. This is the pricier of the group at a couple $K depending on what all you choose. Programing languages are based on Mono in C# and JS.

    Novel has the MonoTouch tool as well if you're more knowledgable with the .NET languages from Microsoft. I think this one starts at $400. The prices are all estimate best guess from last I remembered.

    I hope this helps, because there are a lot of options and these are just a few.

    Kind regards,
    Scott, LittleBitStudio.com
    10-20-2011 02:08 PM
  6. cdbeshore's Avatar
    The best advice I've every received is that you don't know everything about Objective C, you look it up. Point being, learn enough to get started and just start working on an app and learn more as you go.
    10-26-2011 12:29 PM
  7. Prospectus's Avatar
    I studied for about a year, and couldn't wrap my head around it completely. I wanted to do everything "the right way", but that's impossible at first. Then I decided to start Frankensteining things together, improving and cleaning up as I went along. That worked for me. Used lots of tutorials and code samples, and re-purposed them as needed. Now I'm to the point I could almost write a simple app from scratch. Nothing like getting your hands dirty, IMO.
    10-31-2011 12:44 PM
  8. vorino's Avatar
    Yes, the sample code is well worth browsing through and tinkering with. That and the API documentation. Plunge right in!

    I studied for about a year, and couldn't wrap my head around it completely. I wanted to do everything "the right way", but that's impossible at first. Then I decided to start Frankensteining things together, improving and cleaning up as I went along. That worked for me. Used lots of tutorials and code samples, and re-purposed them as needed. Now I'm to the point I could almost write a simple app from scratch. Nothing like getting your hands dirty, IMO.
    11-03-2011 12:23 AM
  9. GreenflyStudios's Avatar
    @mecie The key point here would be 'start slowly', follow a structured set of tutorials and understand it fully. After you have learnt from a tutorial, begin making lots of little applications that uses the new code - this really imprints it into your mind and opens up new avenues you hadn't identified.

    For a suggestion, I would heartily recommend any book by Aaron Hillegass - very clear, very concise.
    11-21-2011 08:48 AM
  10. iiiisoft's Avatar
    1. Buy a mac
    2. Download and install xcode
    3. Write a Hello World project
    11-21-2011 09:56 AM
  11. DoodleDudeDan's Avatar
    I had a very old, stale coding background in C, C++, and Smalltalk. to get started, I:

    1. Bought 2 books, both from Apress: "Learn Objective-C on the Mac" and "Beginning iPhone 4 Development - Exploring the iOS SDK" by Mark, Nutting, & LaMarche. Excellent Book!

    2. downloaded Xcode from Apple

    3. Started coding each example in the Beginning iPhone 4 Development" book. There is downloadable code - DON'T ever look at it unless you are hopelessly stuck. Do the work, learn the intricacies of this environment.

    4. (Best thing ever) around chapter 12, I was no longer challenged by the book. That's when I downloaded and started to use the cocos2d framework for the iPhone. (Just google cocos2d and you'll find it). It takes a little while to wrap your head around the different environment of cocos2d (Layers & Nodes, etc) but it's well worth the effort! Plus there's a large and generous developer community where (unlike in the Apple developer forums) your questions will actually get discussed and answered with coding examples when needed,

    The end result is that as of last week, 2 versions of my first iPhone game "Puffer's Train Challenge" and "Puffer's Train Challenge Lite" are now both posted and live in the Apple App Store!

    Here's the take away from this: Do the Work! Put in the Time! Ask questions only after researching them First Yourself! and once you have a handle on something, SHARE That Knowledge!

    Follow those rules and I'll look forward to seeing your first App posting here in the future!

    DoodleDudeDan
    11-22-2011 04:58 AM
  12. dfrmnk's Avatar
    Try Corona. We use also Objective C with Xcode, AIR 3.0, but LUA with Corona SDK is definitely the fastest option.
    11-24-2011 05:50 AM
  13. gabriel81mi's Avatar
    u can read many tutorials online
    01-28-2012 09:32 PM
  14. superblooddrainer's Avatar
    just start somewhere else with the easiest ones, only reading or watching will mix you up.
    02-03-2012 03:48 PM
  15. msAdele's Avatar
    It seems like there are a lot of options. However, if I may ask, which one is the easiest to use?
    02-21-2012 12:11 AM
  16. Mediacitygames's Avatar
    Hi , i had this same problem one year ago , and i choose Corona SDK back then and i do not regret, my first ios game (you can also make apps with corona) was alredy sent to apple and it is waiting for approval , I learned everything from desing to code from scratch (corona is easy even if you have little or no coding experience) I finished my first project in less than a year.

    Just dont quit,
    02-21-2012 12:14 PM
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