1. StormJH1's Avatar
    Fraser Speirs - Blog - Misconceptions About iOS Multitasking

    Fact Or Myth: Killing Apps In The iOS Multitasking Bar Boosts Performance -- AppAdvice

    Stop me if everyone in this well-educated community already knew this, but I guarantee you that most people using iOS right now do not! When I switched to iOS from BlackBerry, I was thrilled to see how easy iOS5 made it to show the "task manager" and then close apps by getting them to "shake" and hitting the little "-" sign.

    Except the articles linked above describe how that's a complete misconception, and that you're actually doing nothing to help your CPU usage or battery life. The articles describe the 5 different states that apps go into, and when you open up the task bar, what you're really looking at is more akin to an "App History" than a true task manager. This makes sense, too, because many apps that I enter back into (particularly if it's after more than a few minutes) behave as if I completely closed them down before.

    Anyway, even if this revelation was redundant, I thought I'd repost here because I had gotten this advice from virtually all of my Apple-using friends, and it turns out it's just plain wrong!
    01-08-2012 04:19 PM
  2. Garz's Avatar
    I don't believe it helps. Not at all.
    01-08-2012 05:16 PM
  3. ketz's Avatar
    This really annoys me when I tell my friends this. They all delete their apps off the "multitask bar" thinking it is saving them hours.

    http://www.macworld.com.au/help/ios-...xplained-42345
    01-08-2012 06:02 PM
  4. leharris22's Avatar
    Common misconception. Check out the article TiPB (now iMore!) wrote on it.
    01-08-2012 06:18 PM
  5. kch50428's Avatar
    I don't believe it helps. Not at all.
    Depends on the app. Closing an app that uses GPS yields slower rate of battery drain than leaving the app running. I know this from real life experience.
    dyne2199 likes this.
    01-08-2012 06:19 PM
  6. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    I admit, I'm one of the many people that thought this was something that had to be done also to "close out" apps running in the background. I'm actually in the habit of closing out every night before bed, and depending on how much stuff I do throughout the day, sometimes I'd close out mid day also.

    Well, this will be interesting to try NOT having to worry about closing out the apps. But I'm sure doing this on occasion won't do any harm either
    01-08-2012 08:43 PM
  7. Cleveland's Avatar
    The only app I've ever done ANYTHING with is the Google+ app... Deleted it and my battery life improved slightly
    01-09-2012 12:08 AM
  8. Peligro911's Avatar
    I don't think so much about battery but first hand my 4 year old iPod gets. Sluggish if u don't kill the 30 apps that r open lol


    Sent Into Orbit from my iPhone 4S using Tapatalk
    01-09-2012 12:16 AM
  9. BLiNK's Avatar
    coming from a jailbroken stance i am glad to see more information confirming this. it's nice to know that i do not NEED to have a tweak that kills ALL apps in the switcher

    i have plenty of other things to obsess about
    01-09-2012 09:56 AM
  10. sting7k's Avatar
    This is correct on the CPU and battery but with the memory IMO iOS 4 did a better job keeping memory free without me thinking about it than iOS 5 does. I do go through and close if I've been using a lot of apps and transition animations start to lag and hang across the OS; clearing the app history bar brings back the butter smoothness instantly.
    01-09-2012 11:06 AM
  11. Guacho's Avatar
    Common misconception. Check out the article TiPB (now iMore!) wrote on it.
    I saw a video here in Tipb that showed that closing apps actually reduced the ram the iphone uses... The poster said it was actually a good thing. Confused !!!
    01-09-2012 11:37 AM
  12. Guacho's Avatar
    I admit, I'm one of the many people that thought this was something that had to be done also to "close out" apps running in the background. I'm actually in the habit of closing out every night before bed, and depending on how much stuff I do throughout the day, sometimes I'd close out mid day also.

    Well, this will be interesting to try NOT having to worry about closing out the apps. But I'm sure doing this on occasion won't do any harm either
    I do the same everynight before going to bed, It only take a few seconds to close all my apps... no big deal to me .
    ThePinkChameleon likes this.
    01-09-2012 11:39 AM
  13. hellomiggy's Avatar
    It has always been a habit, I don't care if it doesn't help or if it does. I do notice that it does stop lag, sometimes if there is a lot of apps open. It will take a couple of seconds to get rid of the choppiness, but at the same time. "Y U NO HARD RESTART?" It will probably give you the same results. Pretty sure people who do this (I am one of them), has always had the habit since iOS4.
    ThePinkChameleon likes this.
    01-09-2012 11:44 AM
  14. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    I do the same everynight before going to bed, It only take a few seconds to close all my apps... no big deal to me .
    yea, i will prob continue to do this as it is a habit now. In fact, just istting here, i closed out those apps just out of habit lol.

    It has always been a habit, I don't care if it doesn't help or if it does. I do notice that it does stop lag, sometimes if there is a lot of apps open. It will take a couple of seconds to get rid of the choppiness, but at the same time. "Y U NO HARD RESTART?" It will probably give you the same results. Pretty sure people who do this (I am one of them), has always had the habit since iOS4.
    I'm with you on this, whether it helps or not. Like i just stated above, its a habit i now have, and i have even preached to my husband and 2 of my kids that have iphones 4 & 4S, to do this every night as well prior to knowing that its not absolutely necessary.

    I've been doing this on my iPad for quite some time too, so continuing to do so i don't believe will cause any harm either
    hellomiggy likes this.
    01-09-2012 12:40 PM
  15. Pjr772's Avatar
    I've gotten in the habit of closing apps most of the time when I am done with them due to the battery myth. I have also gotten in the the habit or it may just be an OCD to check the usage and diagnostics and have noticed that when I do happen to leave multiple apps in the dock I tend to get more low memory notifications or whatever they are called in the usage and diagnostic area. It will list all the open apps. Now I very well could be completely misunderstanding what I am looking at as I am somewhat of a tech ***** but I try. The low memory notifications could just be a coincidence I've never really tried to see if they show up regardless of how many apps I have in the dock or an empty dock
    01-09-2012 12:53 PM
  16. ghostface147's Avatar
    I think it's good when you close your apps on a somewhat frequent basis. Does it free memory? Yes. Does it help battery life? Debatable. There could be some rogue apps causing issues, so as stated above, close things on a somewhat frequent basis.
    01-09-2012 01:02 PM
  17. Guacho's Avatar
    I think it's good when you close your apps on a somewhat frequent basis. Does it free memory? Yes. Does it help battery life? Debatable. There could be some rogue apps causing issues, so as stated above, close things on a somewhat frequent basis.
    Even if it doesn't affect battery life at all I'll keep doing it to free some memory..
    01-10-2012 12:04 AM
  18. StormJH1's Avatar
    Even if it doesn't affect battery life at all I'll keep doing it to free some memory..
    Except if you read the articles I linked, they claim that it doesn't affect memory either:

    Let me wrap this up by giving you a quick summary:

    If someone tells you that all the apps in the multitasking bar are running, using up memory or sucking power, they are wrong.
    When you hit the home button, an app moves from Active to Background and quickly to the Suspended state where it no longer uses CPU time or drains power.
    An app may request an additional 10 minutes of Background running to complete a big task before becoming Suspended.
    If memory is becoming scarce, iOS will automatically move Suspended apps into the Not Running state and reclaim their memory.
    Five classes of apps audio, GPS, VOIP, Newsstand and accessory apps and some built-in apps such as Mail may run indefinitely in the background until they complete their task.

    Put simply: you do not have to manage background tasks on iOS. The system handles almost every case for you and well written audio, GPS, VOIP, Newsstand and accessory apps will handle the rest.


    The point is that people assume the app switcher bar is like a task manager because we all grew up on Windows devices and that's the closest analogy. The article(s) are saying that it isn't - it's more akin to an app history list. That's why you can pile up like 40 things in there and the device still functions...those apps aren't running.

    The best evidence that this are true is what happens when you click on an app from the switcher bar and it doesn't resume what you were doing, but rather starts it all over. It's no different than if you had clicked the icon from your home page.
    01-13-2012 10:44 AM
  19. StormJH1's Avatar
    I think it's good when you close your apps on a somewhat frequent basis. Does it free memory? Yes. Does it help battery life? Debatable. There could be some rogue apps causing issues, so as stated above, close things on a somewhat frequent basis.
    I understand the impulse to clean that tray out. I'm STILL doing it even though I learned this information. But the point is that you don't need to.

    On BlackBerry (and probably other OS's) this was a huge problem because I would open Google Maps or something and have no idea why my battery was pissing away. Then I'd discover that I left the App open in the background and it was using GPS for 3 straight hours.

    On iOS, the little arrow indicator at the top appears if the GPS is active, so my assumption is that I would know.
    01-13-2012 10:47 AM
  20. circlez's Avatar
    I can tell no difference in the way that my phone behaves if I close applications or leave them in the multitasking tray. Sadly, I cannot say the same for my GS II. Hahaha.
    01-16-2012 10:31 PM
  21. bugeyed's Avatar
    I find it interesting that some people admit that they regularly, manually close all their apps & at the same time state that they know that it does nothing to effect performance. They admit that it is just a habit!? I understand the OCD driven motivation to do these things, but I think it speaks more to how many people in our culture operate from superstition, habit & blind obedience to things that they don't understand. I guess this is to be expected when such advanced technology is in the hands of everyone that can afford it. What was it Sir Arthur C. Clarke said, "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic". I am technical enough to kinda understand how computer based devices work, but it does take effort to learn & at some level it's just magic. In the end, I guess, we have to feel comfortable with the hi tech devices that we use, so if it makes you feel better to manually close these apps, go for it. At least it gives you the feeling that you are in control, although deep inside we all know that technology is in charge
    Cheers,
    kev
    01-17-2012 08:01 AM
  22. Guacho's Avatar
    Except if you read the articles I linked, they claim that it doesn't affect memory either:

    Let me wrap this up by giving you a quick summary:

    If someone tells you that all the apps in the multitasking bar are running, using up memory or sucking power, they are wrong.
    When you hit the home button, an app moves from Active to Background and quickly to the Suspended state where it no longer uses CPU time or drains power.
    An app may request an additional 10 minutes of Background running to complete a big task before becoming Suspended.
    If memory is becoming scarce, iOS will automatically move Suspended apps into the Not Running state and reclaim their memory.
    Five classes of apps – audio, GPS, VOIP, Newsstand and accessory apps – and some built-in apps such as Mail may run indefinitely in the background until they complete their task.

    Put simply: you do not have to manage background tasks on iOS. The system handles almost every case for you and well written audio, GPS, VOIP, Newsstand and accessory apps will handle the rest.


    The point is that people assume the app switcher bar is like a task manager because we all grew up on Windows devices and that's the closest analogy. The article(s) are saying that it isn't - it's more akin to an app history list. That's why you can pile up like 40 things in there and the device still functions...those apps aren't running.

    The best evidence that this are true is what happens when you click on an app from the switcher bar and it doesn't resume what you were doing, but rather starts it all over. It's no different than if you had clicked the icon from your home page.
    Please explain what is going on in this video then....

    http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_u...?v=1XMtk9pbaj8
    01-17-2012 01:56 PM
  23. StormJH1's Avatar
    Please explain what is going on in this video then....

    YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.
    I can't view your link, it doesn't show any specific videos. If you have any proof that "closing" apps in the switcher bar improves performance, I'd love to see it. Again, if you really look at what happens when you try to reopen a "suspended" app from the bar, I think it's more consistent with the theory that the apps are closing down on their own. It may not happen for 5-10 minutes or so, but the device is not running 40 things at one time - it just isn't true.

    I just ran into another new iPhone user who relayed the same view (that emptying the switcher bar improves battery life). I think it's worthwhile to talk about because it'd be a remarkable if the clear majority of iPhone users were under a misconception about extra work they had to do to help a problem with their phone (and were getting fed that advice by Apple reps).
    02-06-2012 10:58 AM
  24. SaberSerene's Avatar
    Fraser Speirs - Blog - Misconceptions About iOS*Multitasking

    Fact Or Myth: Killing Apps In The iOS Multitasking Bar Boosts Performance -- AppAdvice

    Stop me if everyone in this well-educated community already knew this, but I guarantee you that most people using iOS right now do not! When I switched to iOS from BlackBerry, I was thrilled to see how easy iOS5 made it to show the "task manager" and then close apps by getting them to "shake" and hitting the little "-" sign.

    Except the articles linked above describe how that's a complete misconception, and that you're actually doing nothing to help your CPU usage or battery life. The articles describe the 5 different states that apps go into, and when you open up the task bar, what you're really looking at is more akin to an "App History" than a true task manager. This makes sense, too, because many apps that I enter back into (particularly if it's after more than a few minutes) behave as if I completely closed them down before.

    Anyway, even if this revelation was redundant, I thought I'd repost here because I had gotten this advice from virtually all of my Apple-using friends, and it turns out it's just plain wrong!
    Let's get something straight here. If you don't kill some apps the os will do it sloppy. Check out your settings app and about. scroll to diagnostic. When you see Low memory this means you had too many apps wasting your ram. apps crash from low memory. iOS hasn't been the same since 4.0 / x
    At that time iOS did do it's job. Apple jumped the gun with 5.0.

    Disregard people who say "killing apps doesn't matter". It does matter. iOS is horrible with memory. Manage your apps and you'll be fine. Now for battery life. Apps like Motionx gps that require your location are active when exiting to your home screen. radio apps like TuneIn Radio abide by the same concept. streaming audio in the background and or enabling location for local radio. Games such as Infinity Blade suck up a lot of ram and yes will drain battery. You should limit your apps in the tray. up to 5 or 6.
    02-28-2012 10:28 PM
  25. jclif's Avatar
    The best evidence that this are true is what happens when you click on an app from the switcher bar and it doesn't resume what you were doing, but rather starts it all over. It's no different than if you had clicked the icon from your home page.
    Thats not the case with me, when I open an app like words with friends or Facebook from the switcher bar, it ALWAYS takes me back from where I left off. Even when I use Pandora, it doesn't stop running when I hit the home button, I have to physically shut it down from the switcher bar. Am I saying that EVERY app acts this way? No. but there are defintely apps out there that need to be shut down manually. I do it all the time and I can go a full 12 hours with my battery still having 65% at the end of the day and yes I use my phone alot.
    02-29-2012 10:51 AM
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