1. wolfee48's Avatar
    The histrionics about this are incredibly entertaining.

    Next up, APPLE KICKS PUPPIES ZOMGELEVENTY!?!!!!1!1!1!1!1!1!!1!1!!1!1!!1!1!!1!1! !1!1!11!!1!1!1!1!!1!1!!1!1!!1!1!1!1
    High five!

    I agree. Nonsense battering, yet entertaining. I have no concern.
    12-22-2017 10:25 AM
  2. Quis89's Avatar
    People are letting Apple off VERY easy over this. What they did is fine. But they fact that they didn't let people know this was happening is extremely problematic. Devices were slowing down and rather than letting people know, "Hey, replace your battery and you'll be good". They said nothing, causing people to upgrade their devices when all they had to do was replace the battery. This was shady and manipulative. I don't care how fans spin it or how Apple tries to justify it. I don't have an issue with them adjusting the OS to compensate for our batteries aging. Just tell me that. As a consumer, we all deserved to know. And Apple should have let us know.
    12-22-2017 10:31 AM
  3. DMP89145's Avatar
    People are letting Apple off VERY easy over this. What they did is fine. But they fact that they didn't let people know this was happening is extremely problematic. Devices were slowing down and rather than letting people know, "Hey, replace your battery and you'll be good". They said nothing, causing people to upgrade their devices when all they had to do was replace the battery. This was shady and manipulative. I don't care how fans spin it or how Apple tries to justify it. I don't have an issue with them adjusting the OS to compensate for our batteries aging. Just tell me that. As a consumer, we all deserved to know. And Apple should have let us know.
    I think that's the heart of it. Not so much that it's being done, but the lack of communication/transparency.
    Gray Area likes this.
    12-22-2017 10:39 AM
  4. Quis89's Avatar
    It’s not “when they upgrade their iOS version”, nor “on older phones”, it’s when the battery starts degrading.
    The hardware performance is throttled to maximize what’s left of the battery life aka you’re due to replace it anyway so you might as well take advantage of the situation.
    This isn't true. Battery degradation alone isn't what is causing the slowness. Apple is compensating for
    the effects of that battery degradation (random reboots) by implementing throttling features into our devices. So to prevent our devices from shutting down randomly, our devices are throttled. These features were introduced via iOS version updates. This was directly stated from Apple. The iPhone 7 received this throttling feature with the iOS 11.2 upgrade.

    Bye Felicia.

    I've had my 7+ since launch and if Apple is slowing it down, I can't tell. It's still fast and performing just as good, if not better, then the day I bought it.
    Too early for you to notice an issue. This grew out of concern from owners of 6/6s(+) users. The "feature" they referenced was just newly introduced on your device with 11.2.

    Basically...it is with older devices after upgrading iOS versions and will only show it's face as time passes. We should all hope that a year old device wouldn't be affected already. But it's more understandable with devices 2 years old or more.
    Gray Area likes this.
    12-22-2017 10:53 AM
  5. doogald's Avatar
    Obviously you're an apple sheep. Ive read this and many other articles and no matter how Apple tries to spin this, the bottom line is that the high road would have been to let ppl know that a simple battery change would fix any issues but they decided to make it so that ppl believe their phones are slow and buy the next thing. Why didn't they put a notice in the software up-to let users know what they're doing? Why? Because #bottomlines
    1. How do we know that Android isn't doing the same thing?
    2. We do know for certain that almost all Android OEMs but Google and Motorola have cheated on benchmark test apps (in other words, they let the processor spike when running Geekbench and other tests when the system should have spun down the processor clock with other apps.) OnePlus was just caught doing it again this year.

    I agree that Apple should have been more clear about what was happening, but the release notes of iOS 10.2.1 said right in black and white that it included changes to improve the battery life on older devices. Nobody really figured out that this meant that they were clocking down the CPU at peaks only to prevent phones from shutting down from an excessive battery spike/

    https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1893?locale=en_US

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone.
    Just_Me_D, TgeekB and TwitchyPuppy like this.
    12-22-2017 10:54 AM
  6. Lee_Bo's Avatar
    Too early for you to notice an issue. This grew out of concern from owners of 6/6s(+) users. The "feature" they referenced was just newly introduced on your device with 11.2.

    Basically...it is with older devices after upgrading iOS versions and will only show it's face as time passes. We should all hope that a year old device wouldn't be affected already. But it's more understandable with devices 2 years old or more.
    My son had my old 6s+ and he's also not seeing a slowdown issue and he stays glued to his phone all day (he's 18) so I feel confident in saying that if he noticed an issue I'd be hearing about it.
    TwitchyPuppy likes this.
    12-22-2017 10:58 AM
  7. Quis89's Avatar
    My son had my old 6s+ and he's also not seeing a slowdown issue and he stays glued to his phone all day (he's 18) so I feel confident in saying that if he noticed an issue I'd be hearing about it.
    That's good. I'd be interested in someone who started with the 6s+ on release day. They'd be able to better tell their experiences from when the phone was new until now. My son also gets my hand-me-downs. But his frame of reference isn't the same as mine because he doesn't know how the phone ran fresh out of the box. He knows how it runs after a year of use. So he may not recognize the same slowdowns I notice. My grandpa has a 5SE that he bought used. He doesn't have an issue with it. I use it and want to pull my hair out lol. I had a 5SE as well when it released but definitely don't remember it performing how his was. I could also just be so used to my X (and 7 Plus before that) that I just don't realize how slow things really were then.
    12-22-2017 11:06 AM
  8. Quis89's Avatar
    1. How do we know that Android isn't doing the same thing?
    2. We do know for certain that almost all Android OEMs but Google and Motorola have cheated on benchmark test apps (in other words, they let the processor spike when running Geekbench and other tests when the system should have spun down the processor clock with other apps.) OnePlus was just caught doing it again this year.

    I agree that Apple should have been more clear about what was happening, but the release notes of iOS 10.2.1 said right in black and white that it included changes to improve the battery life on older devices. Nobody really figured out that this meant that they were clocking down the CPU at peaks only to prevent phones from shutting down from an excessive battery spike/

    https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1893?locale=en_US

    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    I'd be willing to bet they do. Android is so fragmented of an OS that it'd be tough to roll out a mass fix for it though. +1 for Apple and iOS. But I recall the LG G3 having similar random restart issues.
    12-22-2017 11:09 AM
  9. moshe5368's Avatar
    This is just like Washington politics. It’s not the crime, it’s the coverup. I still have a 6s+ as well as my 8+. I use both for my business and see no real difference in performance. I do think the software upgrades improve battery life and see that in my daily use of both phones. I agree that Apple should have been more transparent about the issue but, hey, they sell phones. Go figure.
    Premium1 likes this.
    12-22-2017 11:54 AM
  10. TgeekB's Avatar
    1. How do we know that Android isn't doing the same thing?
    2. We do know for certain that almost all Android OEMs but Google and Motorola have cheated on benchmark test apps (in other words, they let the processor spike when running Geekbench and other tests when the system should have spun down the processor clock with other apps.) OnePlus was just caught doing it again this year.

    I agree that Apple should have been more clear about what was happening, but the release notes of iOS 10.2.1 said right in black and white that it included changes to improve the battery life on older devices. Nobody really figured out that this meant that they were clocking down the CPU at peaks only to prevent phones from shutting down from an excessive battery spike/

    https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1893?locale=en_US

    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    This.

    They weren’t hiding anything. Maybe they didn’t explain it in intimate detail, but how many people even read about what comes in an update? I’m willing to bet most people just hit the “update” button.

    They were trying to help people with older devices and with poor batteries get more life out of their phones and they get flack for it.
    Typical.
    TwitchyPuppy likes this.
    12-22-2017 01:34 PM
  11. MasterDarque's Avatar
    How come I haven't heard it called batterygate yet?
    You haven’t been reading other forums?
    Cough :MacRumors: cough...
    TwitchyPuppy likes this.
    12-22-2017 01:42 PM
  12. Trigati's Avatar
    How come I haven't heard it called batterygate yet?
    Because you haven't looked at enough sites.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/apple...g-deal-2017-12
    12-22-2017 02:09 PM
  13. Premium1's Avatar
    Reducing the performance to maintain battery life is understandable IMO.
    I agree but the fact they won't tell users is not. Not to mention the fact that if their battery tests say the battery is fine, they wont even allow users to get a new battery (even if they want to pay the $79 for it). This makes it seem it is more for apple to try and get people to upgrade versus maintaining battery life.
    Quis89, Wotchered, calebt and 1 others like this.
    12-22-2017 02:24 PM
  14. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I am always amazed at people’s expectations of “transparency” from a business and/or government entity. People are rarely completely transparent in a personal relationship, so what makes them think an entity will be transparent in all things? Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not defending Apple, but I am questioning the legitimacy of the claims about it failing to be transparent with regard to the battery issue. I’d argue that even if they had flat out told everyone, people would still be having a fit and calling it battery-gate.
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 12-22-2017 at 06:49 PM.
    taz323, TgeekB and pr1nce like this.
    12-22-2017 03:23 PM
  15. Wotchered's Avatar
    I agree but the fact they won't tell users is not. Not to mention the fact that if their battery tests say the battery is fine, they wont even allow users to get a new battery (even if they want to pay the $79 for it). This makes it seem it is more for apple to try and get people to upgrade versus maintaining battery life.
    I concur, by doing this Apple is preventing affected owners from even testing the idea that their battery is past it's best ! And why? you are not going to convince me that it is not possible to at least break even at $79 !
    Premium1 likes this.
    12-22-2017 03:32 PM
  16. Quis89's Avatar
    I am always amazed at people’s expectations of “transparency” from a business and/or government entity. People are rarely completely transparent in a personal relationship, so what makes them think an entity will be transparent in all things? Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not defending Apple, but I am questioning the legitimacy of the claims about it failing to be transparent with regard to the battery issue. I’d argue that even they had flat out told everyone people would still be having a fit and calling it battery-gate.
    It’s not unreasonable to ask that a tech company simply let us know they are slowing down our devices prior to allowing us to purchase a new device due to that slowness when other options would be available such as a new battery. That’s quite a shallow transparency level to request, imo. I didn’t expect so many people to be so nonchalant about this honestly lol. Good for Apple at least.
    DMP89145 and Premium1 like this.
    12-22-2017 06:12 PM
  17. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    It’s not unreasonable to ask that a tech company simply let us know they are slowing down our devices prior to allowing us to purchase a new device due to that slowness when other options would be available such as a new battery. That’s quite a shallow transparency level to request, imo. I didn’t expect so many people to be so nonchalant about this honestly lol. Good for Apple at least.
    It’s not unreasonable to understand that a company will make efforts to get its current customers to upgrade to its latest offering(s). That’s business 101.
    12-22-2017 06:38 PM
  18. Quis89's Avatar
    After years of people saying “Apple doesn’t throttle older phones to get you to upgrade” and now your response is this?

    It’s not unreasonable to understand that a company will make efforts to get its current customers to upgrade to its latest offering(s). That’s business 101.
    That’s unfortunate.

    There are other ways to encourage consumer spending that don’t include manipulation and shady practices.

    I don’t even know if I believe Apple was being manipulative here. But if they were, and your response was their thinking, that’s scary lol.
    DMP89145 and Premium1 like this.
    12-22-2017 06:48 PM
  19. DMP89145's Avatar
    It’s not unreasonable to understand that a company will make efforts to get its current customers to upgrade to its latest offering(s). That’s business 101.
    I want to make sure I understand what you're saying..

    I am reading this as "I'm okay with Apple throttling devices without consumer knowledge in the interest of business"

    I don't want to misinterpret. Would you add a little more color to that post?
    Premium1 likes this.
    12-22-2017 07:27 PM
  20. TripleOne's Avatar
    I agree but the fact they won't tell users is not. Not to mention the fact that if their battery tests say the battery is fine, they wont even allow users to get a new battery (even if they want to pay the $79 for it). This makes it seem it is more for apple to try and get people to upgrade versus maintaining battery life.
    I completely agree!
    As mentioned by Rob, Apple should have not been transparent about it.
    DMP89145 and Premium1 like this.
    12-22-2017 07:33 PM
  21. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I want to make sure I understand what you're saying..

    I am reading this as "I'm okay with Apple throttling devices without consumer knowledge in the interest of business"

    I don't want to misinterpret. Would you add a little more color to that post?
    I’m saying this: to think that a company will not take steps to get its customers to buy its newest offering(s) is naive. In addition, expecting complete transparency from a company with a history of secrecy for an issue like this when arguably a majority of its customers willingly buy its newest iPhone model “every” year out of desire is laughable to “me”.
    12-22-2017 08:35 PM
  22. doogald's Avatar
    After years of people saying “Apple doesn’t throttle older phones to get you to upgrade” and now your response is this?
    But Apple didn't. They throttle phones with underperforming batteries **only when the demand would make the battery fail and shut down the phone**. Note that the performance isn't throttled 100% of the time - it's only when cranking up the CPU would cause the battery to dramatically drain. If anything Apple isn't throttling to get you to upgrade; they are throttling because they wanted to reduce problems for people with phones that shut down when the battery meter reads 40%, and wanted people with these older phones to continue to be able to use them as long as they wished, rather than live with a phone that might shut down at any moment. Throttling to make people upgrade is the exact opposite of why they throttled. If they wanted to make people upgrade, they'd put up a message (like the iPhone is too hot message) that the phone can no no longer run and it's time to replace the battery or upgrade to a new phone.

    I have to be honest - I think Apple not saying that CPU was occasionally reduced was the right choice. The vast, vast, vast majority of people cannot understand the nuances of how these devices work and wouldn't have been able to understand that the CPU doesn't run at full speed most of the time anyway. Clearly, from the reaction to this story, people still don't understand this.
    Just_Me_D and TgeekB like this.
    12-22-2017 09:35 PM
  23. DMP89145's Avatar
    I’m saying this: to think that a company will not take steps to get its customers to buy its newest offering(s) is naive. In addition, expecting complete transparency from a company with a history of secrecy for an issue like this when arguably a majority of its customers willingly buy its newest iPhone model “every” year out of desire is laughable to “me”.
    I got ya, I think.. You're saying, basically, that it's a fool's move to forget that Apple is a for profit company. Expecting them to be "your best friend/neighbor/bother-in-law" is silly from the beginning.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    12-22-2017 09:36 PM
  24. Quis89's Avatar
    I got ya, I think.. You're saying, basically, that it's a fool's move to forget that Apple is a for profit company. Expecting them to be "your best friend/neighbor/bother-in-law" is silly from the beginning.
    This is such a wild belief to me. I get that they are for profit. But if we are excusing a company secretly manipulating our devices to encourage us to upgrade out of some odd belief that business’ have the right to do whatever they want for profit regardless of the unfairness it causes consumers and we are silly to think otherwise, that is insane to me. Lol. Holy cow I can’t believe we are excusing this with that as a rational. I can see debating their intentions. But to excuse poor execution and manipulation under the guise of “its business” is wild to me. I respect the opinion but man I don’t agree with it in the least lol.

    And it’s not completely transparency I’m talking about. But man, why shouldn’t I be able to know what’s going on under the hood of my phone, that I purchased, before buying another phone? How is that wrong of a consumer to expect? Simply to know the manufacturer is slowing down my device to save the battery and that’s why I’m noticing slowness. An expectation of that level can’t seriously be seen as naive can it? Maybe it is and I’m just weird lol.
    12-22-2017 09:52 PM
  25. Quis89's Avatar
    But Apple didn't. They throttle phones with underperforming batteries **only when the demand would make the battery fail and shut down the phone**. Note that the performance isn't throttled 100% of the time - it's only when cranking up the CPU would cause the battery to dramatically drain. If anything Apple isn't throttling to get you to upgrade; they are throttling because they wanted to reduce problems for people with phones that shut down when the battery meter reads 40%, and wanted people with these older phones to continue to be able to use them as long as they wished, rather than live with a phone that might shut down at any moment. Throttling to make people upgrade is the exact opposite of why they throttled. If they wanted to make people upgrade, they'd put up a message (like the iPhone is too hot message) that the phone can no no longer run and it's time to replace the battery or upgrade to a new phone.

    I have to be honest - I think Apple not saying that CPU was occasionally reduced was the right choice. The vast, vast, vast majority of people cannot understand the nuances of how these devices work and wouldn't have been able to understand that the CPU doesn't run at full speed most of the time anyway. Clearly, from the reaction to this story, people still don't understand this.
    I’m honestly not saying they did. I’m only responding to the “a company should be able to do what they want to sell their product” sentiment mentioned above. That was the point of that statement. Because IF that’s what Apple is doing, it seems that practice was excused above under the guise of “business 101”. That is just wild to me.
    12-22-2017 09:53 PM
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