1. iMore.com's Avatar
    The U.S. Department of Justice has stopped pursuing legal action against Apple in the month-long encryption feud between the two parties.

    Full story from the iMore Blog...
    03-28-2016 06:12 PM
  2. atlasmike's Avatar
    So much for encryption.

    Posted via the iMore App for Android
    03-28-2016 08:54 PM
  3. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    While it's a bummer that the FBI was able to break into the phone (to those worried about privacy an encryption), I'm glad that it didn't involve help from Apple. The FBI may have hacked the phone but they failed to set a nasty precent that could be used to fuel future requests.
    Last edited by DevilishBanker; 03-29-2016 at 06:19 AM.
    03-28-2016 09:15 PM
  4. Honey Beagle's Avatar
    Not really terrists should not have any rights. Well one and that is to face the firing squad. So getting into the bums phone is fine.
    03-28-2016 10:18 PM
  5. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    Not really terrists should not have any rights. Well one and that is to face the firing squad. So getting into the bums phone is fine.
    I should have been more clear in my response and I've edited it as a result. I don't feel that it's a bummer that the FBI got into the terrorist's phone specifically; I feel that it's a bummer that a private entity was able to break into an iPhone. It means that there's a way in. I'm not afraid of the government. I'm not doing anything that would warrant them looking at my iPhone to begin with. I'm more afraid of someone else getting into it without my consent.
    03-29-2016 06:24 AM
  6. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    I should have been more clear in my response and I've edited it as a result. I don't feel that it's a bummer that the FBI got into the terrorist's phone specifically; I feel that it's a bummer that a private entity was able to break into an iPhone. It means that there's a way in. I'm not afraid of the government. I'm not doing anything that would warrant them looking at my iPhone to begin with. I'm more afraid of someone else getting into it without my consent.
    Hopefully, Cellebrite and the Feds won't leak how they did it. Hopefully, Apple knows how they did it and will patch it.
    03-29-2016 07:33 AM
  7. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    Hopefully, Cellebrite and the Feds won't leak how they did it. Hopefully, Apple knows how they did it and will patch it.
    That's my main concern. And does it have anything to do with the terrorist using a weak passcode? A four-digit code is much easier to break than, for example, a 16-character alphanumeric code. Even if they found a way to bypass Apple's limits on entering incorrect passcodes, it would still be nearly impossible to use brute force to get through a strong passcode.
    03-29-2016 07:35 AM
  8. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    That's my main concern. And does it have anything to do with the terrorist using a weak passcode? A four-digit code is much easier to break than, for example, a 16-character alphanumeric code. Even if they found a way to bypass Apple's limits on entering incorrect passcodes, it would still be nearly impossible to use brute force to get through a strong passcode.
    And I don't see them ever telling us the details. I want to know all the hack info as well as what info was found.
    03-29-2016 08:31 AM
  9. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I'm not at all surprised that the lawsuit was dropped. I've always expected it at some point. As for having a way into the device, I'm not surprised at that either. There's always a way, and that is why security & encryption are always evolving. Those of us who own iOS devices should not be alarmed or even concerned about the FBI having found a way into a device previously owned by terrorists. First of all, look how long it took them. Furthermore, I expect Apple to make the necessary changes to strengthen iOS in light of it.
    03-29-2016 08:48 AM
  10. Quis89's Avatar
    Well now that the debate over personal privacy versus national security is temporarily over are we back to debating iOS versus Android? Or is there something else that we can fight over?
    03-29-2016 10:30 AM
  11. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Well now that the debate over personal privacy versus national security is temporarily over are we back to debating iOS versus Android? Or is there something else that we can fight over?
    There will always be two viewpoints. Take a look at the current debate over the iPad Pro. The 12.9" version is viewed by some as the "REAL" iPad Pro whereas the new 9.7" version is viewed by some as an "iPad Air 2 on steroids", although it carries the iPad Pro title....
    03-29-2016 11:28 AM
  12. Quis89's Avatar
    There will always be two viewpoints. Take a look at the current debate over the iPad Pro. The 12.9" version is viewed by some as the "REAL" iPad Pro whereas the new 9.7" version is viewed by some as an "iPad Air 2 on steroids", although it carries the iPad Pro title....
    Well that's silly. It's a Pro because it has the word "Pro" in the title. End of debate. Lol.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    03-29-2016 11:59 AM
  13. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Well that's silly. It's a Pro because it has the word "Pro" in the title. End of debate. Lol.
    Yeah, but I'm partially in agreement with the people calling the 12.9" iPad Pro the "Real" one, especially being that the 9.7" version has half the RAM. Furthermore, although the 9.7" version is arguably more attractive to people with older iPads, even more would flock to it, in my opinion, if it had 4 GB RAM. The iPhone 6 Plus and 6S Plus have the same amount of RAM and nearly identical innards so why couldn't the same exist in regard to both iPad Pro models?
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 03-29-2016 at 04:55 PM.
    03-29-2016 12:07 PM
  14. Honey Beagle's Avatar
    I should have been more clear in my response and I've edited it as a result. I don't feel that it's a bummer that the FBI got into the terrorist's phone specifically; I feel that it's a bummer that a private entity was able to break into an iPhone. It means that there's a way in. I'm not afraid of the government. I'm not doing anything that would warrant them looking at my iPhone to begin with. I'm more afraid of someone else getting into it without my consent.
    Now I AGREE with you 100? Great clarification.
    Rob Phillips likes this.
    03-29-2016 04:52 PM
  15. Honey Beagle's Avatar
    There will always be two viewpoints. Take a look at the current debate over the iPad Pro. The 12.9" version is viewed by some as the "REAL" iPad Pro whereas the new 9.7" version is viewed by some as an "iPad Air 2 on steroids", although it carries the iPad Pro title....
    To me the 9.7 iPad pro is like a ultra modern iPad 4.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    03-29-2016 04:54 PM
  16. Honey Beagle's Avatar
    Yeah, but I'm partially in agreement with the people calling the 12.9" iPad Pro the "Real" one, especially being that the 9.7" version has half the RAM. Furthermore, although the 9.7" version is arguably more attractive to people with older iPads, even more would flock to it, in my opinion, if it had 4 GB RAM. The iPhone 6 Plus and 6S Plus have the same amount of RAM and nearly identical innards so why couldn't the same exist in regard to both iPad Pro models?
    What will the iPad Pro 256 GB be referred as?
    03-29-2016 04:57 PM
  17. robertk328's Avatar
    I should have been more clear in my response and I've edited it as a result. I don't feel that it's a bummer that the FBI got into the terrorist's phone specifically; I feel that it's a bummer that a private entity was able to break into an iPhone. It means that there's a way in. I'm not afraid of the government. I'm not doing anything that would warrant them looking at my iPhone to begin with. I'm more afraid of someone else getting into it without my consent.
    I read reports that Apple was already working on strengthening security on the iPhones during this whole ordeal in case it comes back again (and it will).
    03-29-2016 06:31 PM
  18. jbergie's Avatar
    I'm satisfied with the turnout on this issue.
    03-29-2016 11:35 PM
  19. Garz's Avatar
    Cool. Now can we let this topic die?
    03-29-2016 11:39 PM
  20. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    Cool. Now can we let this topic die?
    Doubtful. This is only the tip of the iceberg IMO. There will be more cases to follow. I'm not saying I don't want the topic to die just as much as you do; I just don't think it will happen.
    03-30-2016 06:51 AM
  21. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    Now it's about Apple trying to get info from the FBI. No, this issue will be ongoing in one way or another.
    03-31-2016 10:01 AM
  22. 27John117's Avatar
    Now the FBI used this tactic to unlock another iPhone. So much for the so called "one time".
    03-31-2016 12:01 PM
  23. sting7k's Avatar
    I should have been more clear in my response and I've edited it as a result. I don't feel that it's a bummer that the FBI got into the terrorist's phone specifically; I feel that it's a bummer that a private entity was able to break into an iPhone. It means that there's a way in. I'm not afraid of the government. I'm not doing anything that would warrant them looking at my iPhone to begin with. I'm more afraid of someone else getting into it without my consent.
    You have to remember 3 things about what happened in this case;

    1. It was running iOS 8 of which there are known exploits.
    2. It was an iPhone 5c with a 32 bit chip; so the secure enclave of the 64 bit devices was not in question.
    3. It is not a remote hack; someone must have physical possession of your device. If someone else has possession of your device it's also likely you will wipe the device remotely before they are able to do anything.

    For these reasons it doesn't really bother me that they were able to hack into the iPhone.
    03-31-2016 12:37 PM
  24. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    You have to remember 3 things about what happened in this case;

    1. It was running iOS 8 of which there are known exploits.
    2. It was an iPhone 5c with a 32 bit chip; so the secure enclave of the 64 bit devices was not in question.
    3. It is not a remote hack; someone must have physical possession of your device. If someone else has possession of your device it's also likely you will wipe the device remotely before they are able to do anything.

    For these reasons it doesn't really bother me that they were able to hack into the iPhone.
    True, but we don't have a clue how they got in. The points you mentioned (plus the fact that the terrorist was using a simple 4-digit passcode) make me feel better but it's hard to say with certainty that how they got into the phone would be impossible with a newer device running ios 9.3.
    03-31-2016 12:48 PM

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