1. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Is the D.A.R.E (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program still around? If so, are drug dealers running the program or something? I mean, we have a whole generation of people who have supposedly gone through school and are currently going through school that have been taught the danger of using drugs and yet, these kids and young adults are dying in droves from drug abuse.

    How is that possible? Did they not believe the D.A.R.E. instructors? Did they not see movies, news videos, etcetera depicting people strung out on drugs? If so, did they assume it couldn't or wouldn't happen to them? Is it that difficult to decline an offer to use an illicit drugs when offered?

    What does this haver to do with Apple products, you ask? Well, their Apple products can be used to access the wealth of information needed to sway them away from ever considering using illicit drugs....
    01-26-2019 02:05 PM
  2. metllicamilitia's Avatar
    I heard something a while back that the D.A.R.E. program actually created more drug users than it prevented. I don’t know, it’s just something I heard.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    01-26-2019 02:10 PM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I heard something a while back that the D.A.R.E. program actually created more drug users than it prevented. I don’t know, it’s just something I heard.
    That's crazy. Not only would I like to see stats to back that up, but also the associated reasons.
    01-26-2019 02:13 PM
  4. metllicamilitia's Avatar
    That's crazy. Not only would I like to see stats to back that up, but also the associated reasons.
    Yeah I haven’t looked into yet myself, however, part of what I heard is that it introduced kids to drugs earlier than they would have otherwise learned of them. It taught them names and such. I should look into it though.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    01-26-2019 02:15 PM
  5. metllicamilitia's Avatar
    That's crazy. Not only would I like to see stats to back that up, but also the associated reasons.
    I just looked at the Wikipedia for it, they have synopses of numerous studies done on D.A.R.E. and it was placed on a list of treatments that could cause harm to clients as well more than one study showing that more people used drugs after the program as well as it not being effective at all.
    01-26-2019 02:19 PM
  6. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Yeah I haven’t looked into yet myself, however, part of what I heard is that it introduced kids to drugs earlier than they would have otherwise learned of them. It taught them names and such. I should look into it though.
    That's debatable because depending on one's upbringing and where he or she grew up, a person can be introduced to illicit drugs before starting kindergarten.
    taz323 and nikkisharif like this.
    01-26-2019 02:22 PM
  7. taz323's Avatar
    That's debatable because depending on one's upbringing and where he or she grew up, a person can be introduced to illicit drugs before starting kindergarten.
    So agree, see to much of it, education is not a bad thing. The more you know, the better.
    Just_Me_D and nikkisharif like this.
    01-26-2019 06:04 PM
  8. imwjl's Avatar
    When I worked for an Apple reseller that program was more buy gadget welfare for the cops than doing any good. My kids nailed it early on - some people will always have problems and poor self-control.

    My kids thought the teachers and schools did a much better job of teaching than when police officers used to come in the classes. My wife who teaches kids who are homeless and at risk in a big urban school says D.A.R.E. was a stupid waste of money compared to having good resource officers in the schools. Arm chair directors can say what they wish but she teaches one of the most difficult groups in a big urban school with gangs and two officers present all the time. The D.A.R.E. officers would be better equipped than the schools, mostly create unproductive fear, and never really be there with or for kids the way the liaison officers are.

    Credible news and a friend in law enforcement point out the scenario of the cheap fentanyl and opiates made off shore as a new problem that is probably tied to the OP.

    A RN and EMT friend feels the obesity epidemic contributes as well as a past years phenomenon of more people on disability but the latter is turning around.

    My whole life I’ve seen some will always have problems controlling urges and their tingly parts. It seems best to know we can’t win with all and have programs and teachers who can reach those with potential.
    01-27-2019 08:31 AM
  9. mumfoau's Avatar
    The world is different now. We’re legalizing marijuana so I don’t know how effective a program such as that would even be anymore.
    01-27-2019 09:04 AM
  10. Not Quite Right's Avatar
    Is the D.A.R.E (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program still around?
    I'm pretty sure Trump defunded it along with everything else ...
    pkcable likes this.
    01-27-2019 10:20 AM
  11. nikkisharif's Avatar
    Not sure what happened but these kids/young adults suffer from FOMO like it’s a terminal disease. They’re so eager to try anything because if it.
    01-27-2019 09:21 PM
  12. nikkisharif's Avatar
    The world is different now. We’re legalizing marijuana so I don’t know how effective a program such as that would even be anymore.
    I don’t believe the legalization of marijuana would impact the program. Just because cigarettes, alcohol, & processed sugar are legal doesn’t mean they aren’t addictive drugs.
    libra89, mumfoau and pkcable like this.
    01-27-2019 09:24 PM
  13. libra89's Avatar
    It still exists. I gave a donation to it a few months ago because they set up shop outside of the grocery store and I was convinced. I don't have my receipt but I believe I was told that they lost government funding or something like that so they have to do what they can to get support.
    nikkisharif likes this.
    01-27-2019 09:48 PM
  14. Annie_8plus's Avatar
    It's still active in schools here in my neck of the woods.
    01-28-2019 09:17 AM
  15. Quis89's Avatar
    I haven't heard of that program in years. Although, I will say that the D.A.R.E program didn't seem to have a huge impact in my neck of the woods. We went through the classes and listened to the instructors and wore the t shirts yet a large group of people where I'm from still experimented and/or sold drugs. I'm not a saint. I experimented myself (just alcohol and marijuana).

    My point is, I'm not sure how effective that program was overall, but in my neck of the woods it didn't seem to stop anyone. I think there are larger issues at play and alternative ways to curb drug abuse than saying, "Don't do drugs". You have to identify WHY folks are doing them. Right now the opioid crisis is the big thing. Coincidentally, this is large at the same time we are having these conversations surrounding mental health. In my opinion, it's all related. And lets be honest...mental health isn't being taken seriously currently. The most recent budget cut funding for the department of health and human services by around $17 billion. Many of the cuts include mental health services.

    So we want to fight the drug crisis, but we don't want to address what could be one of the largest factors involved.

    For fun, I did some digging.

    https://priceonomics.com/dare-the-an...ever-actually/

    Basically, what I experienced in my area was the norm. D.A.R.E didn't work.
    libra89 and Just_Me_D like this.
    01-28-2019 10:54 AM
  16. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I haven't heard of that program in years. Although, I will say that the D.A.R.E program didn't seem to have a huge impact in my neck of the woods. We went through the classes and listened to the instructors and wore the t shirts yet a large group of people where I'm from still experimented and/or sold drugs. I'm not a saint. I experimented myself (just alcohol and marijuana).

    My point is, I'm not sure how effective that program was overall, but in my neck of the woods it didn't seem to stop anyone. I think there are larger issues at play and alternative ways to curb drug abuse than saying, "Don't do drugs". You have to identify WHY folks are doing them. Right now the opioid crisis is the big thing. Coincidentally, this is large at the same time we are having these conversations surrounding mental health. In my opinion, it's all related. And lets be honest...mental health isn't being taken seriously currently. The most recent budget cut funding for the department of health and human services by around $17 billion. Many of the cuts include mental health services.

    So we want to fight the drug crisis, but we don't want to address what could be one of the largest factors involved.

    For fun, I did some digging.

    https://priceonomics.com/dare-the-an...ever-actually/

    Basically, what I experienced in my area was the norm. D.A.R.E didn't work.
    Excellent response, Quis, and although I agree that "some" users were mentally messed up prior to using drugs, but not everyone. I'm sure some people succumbed to peer pressure and others out of curiosity. Still, what does that say about today's young people, generally speaking of course? There are "safe zones" on college campuses where students can go to escape listening to speech they don't like or agree with. Some of them seem to think that simply going to college is the same as paying their dues and therefore they should just walk right into a new job and command a CEO's salary. When reality sets in, they quit and refuse to work unless they can get the salary they desire. In the meantime, they turn to drugs to somehow escape their circumstances. On top of that, listen to the lyrics in some of today's hottest tunes. They're filled with drug references. “I'm in love with the CoCo” is an example.

    I don't have the answers, but I sure as heck wish I did because these kids have not yet learned that the things done to the body while young will lead to the body suffering when they're much older.
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 01-28-2019 at 12:42 PM.
    01-28-2019 12:22 PM
  17. BreakingKayfabe's Avatar
    I had a local police officer from the D.A.R.E. program come to my class during 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade, mid-90's. I already had a small inkling of an idea that drugs could be harmful from my parents. This got instilled into me more from D.A.R.E. I actually have thought about Mr. Chavez (the officer) during the years since. I'm willing to bet that not everyone in my classes actually thought of the dangers of drugs at all and are drug users.

    Did they not believe the D.A.R.E. instructors? Did they not see movies, news videos, etcetera depicting people strung out on drugs? If so, did they assume it couldn't or wouldn't happen to them? Is it that difficult to decline an offer to use an illicit drugs when offered?
    Well, every generation has its low-hanging fruit. Incapable of digesting any information they are given let alone remembering negative effects of drugs.
    libra89 and Just_Me_D like this.
    01-28-2019 12:52 PM
  18. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    ..



    Well, every generation has its low-hanging fruit. Incapable of digesting any information they are given let alone remembering negative effects of drugs.
    You’re defiant right about that!...
    01-28-2019 01:09 PM
  19. Quis89's Avatar
    Excellent response, Quis, and although I agree that "some" users were mentally messed up prior to using drugs, but not everyone. I'm sure some people succumbed to peer pressure and others out of curiosity. Still, what does that say about today's young people, generally speaking of course? There are "safe zones" on college campuses where students can go to escape listening to speech they don't like or agree with. Some of them seem to think that simply going to college is the same as paying their dues and therefore they should just walk right into a new job and command a CEO's salary. When reality sets in, they quit and refuse to work unless they can get the salary they desire. In the meantime, they turn to drugs to somehow escape their circumstances. On top of that, listen to the lyrics in some of today's hottest tunes. They're filled with drug references. “I'm in love with the CoCo” is an example.

    I don't have the answers, but I sure as heck wish I did because these kids have not yet learned that the things done to the body while young will lead to the body suffering when they're much older.
    I think todays young people face an entirely different set of obstacles than young people of the past and they are force fed "solutions" from a generation that didn't have the same hurdles as todays young people. So there can be a disconnect between generations who quite frankly aren't privy to the path to success these days because their road was different. College enrollment in the 60s was around 6 million. Compare that today where we are around 20 million students enrolled. Our grandparents didn't need college to be successful. These days, although you may not NEED it, it's going to be tougher to "make it" without one. Annual tuition (accounting for inflation) in the 60s was like $4,000 a year. Dawg...it averages around $20,000 now. Home values averaged around $12,000 in the 60s compared to $200,000 now. Home values have increased by over 115% meanwhile house hold incomes have increased by around 35%.

    Our grandparents (and some of our parents) simply aren't qualified to tell the younger generation how to "make it" these days because they have no idea lol. They didn't grow up in these times. So we tell kids to go to college to be successful and they come out with $60,000 worth of student loan debt and we give them a job being a waiter and tell them to "wait it out" meanwhile those student loan payments aren't waiting on anyone lol.

    And honestly, all of that is beside the drug use topic. I just feel like if we can have conversations with our kids about drug use as well as stay engaged with what they are going through and how they are mentally, it may go a long way.

    I agree with you about the glorification of drugs in media and music. That's a huge issue but I've always sat on the side of, "it's the parents responsibility to parent...not the media". So although I support the media and tech companies doing things to make the parents jobs easier, I also understand that the parents bear the sole responsibility. I know the content in the music my kids listen to. I'm not going to be able to shield them from it so instead we have frequent conversations about it.
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 01-28-2019 at 03:04 PM.
    libra89 likes this.
    01-28-2019 02:00 PM
  20. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I think todays young people face an entirely different set of obstacles than young people of the past and they are force fed "solutions" from a generation that didn't have the same hurdles as todays young people. So there can be a disconnect between generations who quite frankly aren't privy to the path to success these days because their road was different. College enrollment in the 60s was around 6 million. Compare that today where we are around 20 million students enrolled. Our grandparents didn't need college to be successful. These days, although you may not NEED it, it's going to be tougher to "make it" without one. Annual tuition (accounting for inflation) in the 60s was like $4,000 a year. Dawg...it averages around $20,000 now. Home values averaged around $12,000 in the 60s compared to $200,000 now. Home values have increased by over 115% meanwhile house hold incomes have increased by around 35%.
    Good stats, but comparing today’s generation to that of “grandparents” is a stretch.

    Our grandparents (and some of our parents) simply aren't qualified to tell the younger generation how to "make it" these days because they have no idea lol. They didn't grow up in these times.
    I wholeheartedly disagree with that statement because wisdom will always trump knowledge. Sure, times change, people change, but life’s circumstances/struggles remain unchanged. No one goes through life without having choices to make and obstacles to overcome.
    So we tell kids to go to college to be successful and they come out with $60,000 worth of student loan debt and we give them a job being a waiter and tell them to "wait it out" meanwhile those student loan payments aren't waiting on anyone lol.
    Those same kids can’t wait to be an adult and do their own things without having to have their parents’ consent and without having to listen to their parents try to tell them what they should do so they go out into the world only to find out that it’s not all peachy. They learn that the “real world” their parents were trying to warn them about is actually real. They learn that landlords do not care if you don’t have a job. They’ll evict you if you don’t pay. The electric company doesn’t care if your paycheck was a little short. They’ll turn off the power if you don’t pay. Yes, loans are to be repaid, whether car loans, mortgage loans, personal loans or student loans.

    And honestly, all of that is beside the drug use topic. I just feel like if we can have conversations with our kids about drug use as well as stay engaged with what they are going through and how they are mentally, it may go a long way.
    I agree, but both sides have to be open to the other. You can’t just hear what you to hear and discard what you don’t want to hear.

    I agree with you about the glorification of drugs in media and music. That's a huge issue but I've always sat on the side of, "it's the parents responsibility to parent...not the media". So although I support the media and tech companies doing things to make the parents jobs easier, I also understand that the parents bear the sole responsibility. I know the content in the music my kids listen to. I'm not going to be able to shield them from it so instead we have frequent conversations about it.
    Excellent!...
    01-28-2019 03:14 PM
  21. Quis89's Avatar
    Good stats, but comparing today’s generation to that of “grandparents” is a stretch.
    Yea, maybe. The gap is there for all years but not as wide if we leave the 60s and move into the 80s or the 90s. I guess I started the people I have these discussions with offline came up in the 60s and 70s. So it's always fun to hear their perspective.

    I wholeheartedly disagree with that statement because wisdom will always trump knowledge. Sure, times change, people change, but life’s circumstances/struggles remain unchanged. No one goes through life without having choices to make and obstacles to overcome. Those same kids can’t wait to be an adult and do their own things without having to have their parents’ consent and without having to listen to their parents try to tell them what they should do so they go out into the world only to find out that it’s not all peachy. They learn that the “real world” their parents were trying to warn them about is actually real. They learn that landlords do not care if you don’t have a job. They’ll evict you if you don’t pay. The electric company doesn’t care if your paycheck was a little short. They’ll turn off the power if you don’t pay. Yes, loans are to be repaid, whether car loans, mortgage loans, personal loans or student loans
    All of that is separate to the fact that our parents and grandparents didn't grow up under the same economic climate and pressures as today. Honestly that isn't a diss to anyone either. Quite frankly, someone who hasn't had the same experiences as you isn't as qualified to tell you how to handle things. Time's were different. Life was simpler. I hear it from my grandparents all the time. Frequently, I've been told, "I don't know how you kids do it these days" Lol. Some things never change. Work hard. Pay back what is owed. Go to work. Respect others. Some things are constant and will never change and that's what you're referencing. You're referencing the fundamentals that all of us should abide by. But my grandparents can't give me advice on how to apply for jobs these days. Or what skills we should focus on to remain competitive in todays workforce. Or what to major in when we go off to school. I've had full on debates with older folks with the belief that a college degree is the end all be all. And so they were recommending a younger family member to run off and get his degree in Arts and Music because to them, it's all about "going off to college to get a good job" and I'm sitting here like, "No...that major is going to get you a lot of debt for little return." But they didn't grow up in a time where they had to deal with the harsh realities of paying back insane student loan amounts because your schools told you that getting a degree is all you needed without actually advising you about the kind of degree that offers the best value. It's no coincidence that student loan default rates are on the rise year over year. Our parents/grandparents aren't prepared for this world. We are all tech savvy here. But a lot of 40-60 year olds who have spent their whole lives at one employer would be lost if they had to jump into the job market today. My wife worked in recruitment for a staffing agency and a lot of her day was working with middle aged (40-60) year old folks on how to survive in todays job market. How to market themselves and go about applying. You can't just pick up a newspaper anymore. Your online presence is growing more and more important. Job hopping is something millennial have down to a science lol. Income increases far more quickly when you job hop and there are a lot of recent studies discussing this trend. The idea of job hopping still scares baby boomers lol. Different times.

    Wisdom also means knowing when one is not knowledgable about something. So I agree, wisdom will always trump knowledge. But a badge of wisdom doesn't come just because one is older.

    I agree, but both sides have to be open to the other. You can’t just hear what you to hear and discard what you don’t want to hear.
    This is true. But the presentation and delivery of information is equally important. It seems like at times, the older generation would rather talk AT the younger generation than talk WITH them. Doesn't really matter how old anyone is. Nobody has this life thing figured out. Older folks can learn from younger folks just as well.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    01-28-2019 04:14 PM
  22. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Yea, maybe. The gap is there for all years but not as wide if we leave the 60s and move into the 80s or the 90s. I guess I started the people I have these discussions with offline came up in the 60s and 70s. So it's always fun to hear their perspective.



    All of that is separate to the fact that our parents and grandparents didn't grow up under the same economic climate and pressures as today. Honestly that isn't a diss to anyone either. Quite frankly, someone who hasn't had the same experiences as you isn't as qualified to tell you how to handle things. Time's were different. Life was simpler. I hear it from my grandparents all the time. Frequently, I've been told, "I don't know how you kids do it these days" Lol. Some things never change. Work hard. Pay back what is owed. Go to work. Respect others. Some things are constant and will never change and that's what you're referencing. You're referencing the fundamentals that all of us should abide by. But my grandparents can't give me advice on how to apply for jobs these days. Or what skills we should focus on to remain competitive in todays workforce. Or what to major in when we go off to school. I've had full on debates with older folks with the belief that a college degree is the end all be all. And so they were recommending a younger family member to run off and get his degree in Arts and Music because to them, it's all about "going off to college to get a good job" and I'm sitting here like, "No...that major is going to get you a lot of debt for little return." But they didn't grow up in a time where they had to deal with the harsh realities of paying back insane student loan amounts because your schools told you that getting a degree is all you needed without actually advising you about the kind of degree that offers the best value. It's no coincidence that student loan default rates are on the rise year over year. Our parents/grandparents aren't prepared for this world. We are all tech savvy here. But a lot of 40-60 year olds who have spent their whole lives at one employer would be lost if they had to jump into the job market today. My wife worked in recruitment for a staffing agency and a lot of her day was working with middle aged (40-60) year old folks on how to survive in todays job market. How to market themselves and go about applying. You can't just pick up a newspaper anymore. Your online presence is growing more and more important. Job hopping is something millennial have down to a science lol. Income increases far more quickly when you job hop and there are a lot of recent studies discussing this trend. The idea of job hopping still scares baby boomers lol. Different times.

    Wisdom also means knowing when one is not knowledgable about something. So I agree, wisdom will always trump knowledge. But a badge of wisdom doesn't come just because one is older.



    This is true. But the presentation and delivery of information is equally important. It seems like at times, the older generation would rather talk AT the younger generation than talk WITH them. Doesn't really matter how old anyone is. Nobody has this life thing figured out. Older folks can learn from younger folks just as well.
    Excellent comeback, sir. Well done!
    Tartarus likes this.
    01-28-2019 04:24 PM
  23. mina10000's Avatar
    I had a neighborhood cop from the D.A.R.E. program go to my class amid third, fourth, and fifth grade, mid-90's. I previously had a little suspicion of a thought that medications could be unsafe from my folks. This got imparted into me more from D.A.R.E. I really have contemplated Mr. Chavez (the officer) amid the years since. I'm willing to wager that not every person in my classes really thought of the risks of medications at all and are tranquilize clients.
    01-30-2019 10:32 AM
  24. pkcable's Avatar
    Another good resource for drug education and prevention is the work of 12 step fellowships, like Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and Cocaine Anonymous. We sometimes run panels at schools (also at hospitals, rehabs, etc), where AA (or NA, or CA) members will share there own experiences with drug or alcohol abuse, and their recovery. I'm clean and sober myself for 16.5 years.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    01-30-2019 10:55 AM

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