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  1. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    This thread is a takeoff from another thread where a similar discussion was beginning to take place, but was a little off-topic. Having said that, do you think it is best for a kid under the age of 18 to have a smartphone or a non-smartphone?
    03-13-2016 11:41 AM
  2. eyecrispy's Avatar
    I say no phone but that's just not how things work today. My kids use their phones during class at school. If they don't have a phone or tablet, they have to use one of the school's devices and no one wants to be "that kid". I think they have access to way too much way to early these days.
    03-13-2016 11:46 AM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    In my opinion, and more specifically, in my personal situation, the smartphone works out best. As you've already stated, it's great for lessons where they need to access the Internet to complete certain assignments. In addition, I'd like to be able to track my kid's iPhone on occasion. On top of that, I'd like to FaceTime him to make sure he's with the people he says he's with. I also did that with my older kids who are now grown-ups. Watching movies and videos and listening to music are all a part of today's youth and a non-smartphone, at least in my opinion, just won't cut it.
    03-13-2016 11:52 AM
  4. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I say no phone but that's just not how things work today. My kids use their phones during class at school. If they don't have a phone or tablet, they have to use one of the school's devices and no one wants to be "that kid". I think they have access to way too much way to early these days.
    Each generation of parents want their kid to have more than they did and to be smarter than they were. Being exposed to things early is a side effect of that desire, in my opinion. We just manage it the best we can.
    03-13-2016 11:55 AM
  5. MooMooPrincess's Avatar
    I say no phone but I do understand that kids have extra- curricular activities and that parents can't be there 24/7 so a normal cellphone can suffice. Now if they're 15+ and want a smartphone they can work and get one and pay the bill. Teach 'em some responsibility and that its a luxury item and not a necessity
    03-13-2016 11:58 AM
  6. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I say no phone but I do understand that kids have extra- curricular activities and that parents can't be there 24/7 so a normal cellphone can suffice. Now if they're 15+ and want a smartphone they can work and get one and pay the bill. Teach 'em some responsibility and that its a luxury item and not a necessity
    I don't have a problem with that at all, but that's not the same as determining which is best for them in today's society. My adult kids started out with pre-paid phones. My youngest is far more responsible at age 10 than they were at age 12 or 13 when they got their prepaid phones. They hate the fact that he has a smartphone at his current age, but not because of the fact that it's beneficial to not only him, but to me and his mom, but because they had to wait until they were a bit older before getting a phone of any kind.
    Last edited by Just_Me_D; 03-13-2016 at 05:35 PM.
    03-13-2016 12:41 PM
  7. MooMooPrincess's Avatar
    I don't have a problem with that at all, but that's not the same as determining which is best for them in today's society. My adult kids started at with pre-paid phones. My youngest is far more responsible at age 10 than they were at age 12 or 13 when they got their prepaid phones. They hate the fact that he has a smartphone at his current age, but not because of the fact that it's beneficial to not only him, but to me and his mom, but because they had to wait until they were a bit older before getting a phone of any kind.
    Siblings will get jealous of each other, it's only natural. I do understand that with the way technology is advancing a smartphone will eventually become necessary for children I just don't like how fast that is going. We already have the majority of society too absorbed in their phones instead of interacting with each other. Imagine how it will affect young kids letting them have that sort of tech super early. It's just too much of a double-edged sword.
    Just_Me_D and eyecrispy like this.
    03-13-2016 01:03 PM
  8. Cryptic_Mcnuggets's Avatar
    I've always believed that kids should enjoy their youth and I think smartphones are just another, newer way of them doing it, adding along with many other things. You're not young forever, as they say. Just my opinion though. Parents can do whatever they wish with the matter.
    03-17-2016 07:16 PM
  9. Sherry_B's Avatar
    This thread is a takeoff from another thread where a similar discussion was beginning to take place, but was a little off-topic. Having said that, do you think it is best for a kid under the age of 18 to have a smartphone or a non-smartphone?

    (As a parent) IMHO I think it depends on the child. If the child is responsible then a smartphone is a great idea. But if a child is not, then neither.
    Just_Me_D and Laura Knotek like this.
    03-18-2016 01:41 AM
  10. firedept10's Avatar
    My children have had smartphones since they were 12. I see no issue with this at all. It is a great way to stay in communication with your children and teach your children some responsibility. Mine are responsible and now that they are older have learned some lessons with the responsibility of having a smartphone. A smartphone allows me to contact them while in school without bothering their other classmates. They go away to christian camp every year and FaceTime allows them to contact us while they are away.

    If I need to find them I can. And they have never had a problem with that. It also allows them to send pictures to us and keep important pictures for themselves. I do understand that social media can allow them to get in trouble with it, but have taught my children how to be responsible with social media and the repercussions that come with abusing it. It allows them to play games and do many other things that a flip phone can not do.

    Maybe I am just one of the lucky parents that has had no issues with my children and them having smartphones.
    03-18-2016 04:11 AM
  11. horizon286's Avatar
    It doesn't depend on age but more on psychological needs of the child. For instance, I'm 21 now and I had my first smartphone (Nokia N73) in 2006 when I was 11. But my world didn't revolve around it. I used it mostly for music, games and photos. I spent almost all the time out with friends. My sister is 16 years old now and she doesn't even want a smartphone. She's perfectly happy with her iPod and uses a classic dumb phone. On the other hand, my 12 years old brother can't hadle such a thing. He spends all his free time watching Youtube and playing Minecraft and games on his smartphone or family tablet. His grades dropped so my parents had to take his smartphone and he gets it as a reward or only for few hours a day if he does his chores until he's mature enough to handle it.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    03-18-2016 06:01 PM
  12. Sherry_B's Avatar
    It doesn't depend on age but more on psychological needs of the child.
    I'm not sure I follow you here. How does having tech relate to the psychological needs of a child?
    03-18-2016 06:39 PM
  13. Rob Phillips's Avatar
    My kid is getting my Motorola StarTAC. Cellular One still exists, right?
    All kidding aside, I think that feature phones are largely a thing of the past and I like the benefits that having a smartphone brings (location tracking, advanced messaging, FaceTime, parental controls, etc.). You can be sure I'll have his phone on lockdown though.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    03-18-2016 09:01 PM
  14. horizon286's Avatar
    I'm not sure I follow you here. How does having tech relate to the psychological needs of a child?
    It means some children don't need or really want smartphone and they're happy. Others need it either out of peer pressure or just because they think it is a need in today's world. And some can't handle having a smartphone. Sorry if that didn't make sense. English is not my native language.
    03-19-2016 03:54 PM
  15. Trees's Avatar
    In our experience, starting around Middle School (6th grade, or 11-12 yrs old - is usually when this starts in the US) is good timing to transition from an iPod (or older iPhone minus SIM) to a working smartphone with a data plan. As mentioned above, kids are typically more responsible around that age and understand data plan limits and the consequences of exceeding them. A related aspect is carrier plan expenses. They are already high and growing, and adding another smartphone to a plan can be expensive. Waiting until Middle School can help defer the additional expense.
    Last edited by Trees; 03-21-2016 at 06:50 AM.
    03-20-2016 11:23 AM
  16. TwitchyPuppy's Avatar
    My 12 year old step-daughter has a Sony Ericsson Vivaz Pro that I got her.

    It works on 3G, so she can FB and IG with her friends while on the go, but she can also be reached at any time, which is reassuring.

    I even send her pictures of cloth I want to get for myself or her, to have her opinion on it =)
    03-20-2016 12:19 PM

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