1. jean15paul's Avatar
    This is a legitimate question. The heart rate sensor uses infrared and visible light to detect changes in skin color and temperature(?) . Will that sensor be able to see my pulse and blood flow if I have dark brown skin? Does anyone have experience using these light-based heart rate sensors with brown skin?
    04-10-2015 09:36 PM
  2. miketko's Avatar
    I sure hope so, since apple is all about diversity lol
    04-10-2015 09:41 PM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I highly doubt a company as famous & successful as Apple would risk the backlash from excluding people from benefitting from a health-related app due to their skin color.
    shief24, Skuya65 and kataran like this.
    04-10-2015 09:47 PM
  4. Highrisedrifter's Avatar
    I am reminded of the episode of "Better Off Ted" about racial sensitivity.

    for a small excerpt.
    Bigeric23 and jean15paul like this.
    04-10-2015 09:51 PM
  5. John Yester's Avatar
    Heart rate does does effect color of skin or age of skin
    04-10-2015 09:54 PM
  6. jean15paul's Avatar
    I sure hope so, since apple is all about diversity lol
    I highly doubt a company as famous & successful as Apple would risk the backlash from excluding people from benefitting from a health-related app due to their skin color.
    Hopefully
    04-10-2015 10:31 PM
  7. jean15paul's Avatar
    I am reminded of the episode of "Better Off Ted" about racial sensitivity.

    for a small excerpt.
    Nice. That was a good show.
    Highrisedrifter likes this.
    04-10-2015 10:32 PM
  8. shanghaichica's Avatar
    Yes. All of the instruments I use at work to measure my patients vital signs do not discriminate on the basis of skin colour.
    04-11-2015 02:51 AM
  9. jean15paul's Avatar
    Yes. All of the instruments I use at work to measure my patients vital signs do not discriminate on the basis of skin colour.
    Yes, but I assume that you work at a hospital or doctor's office. The pulse ox sensor that I've used in those settings goes on the finger tip, which is not brown so it can easily "see" your pulse.

    Using that exact same technology on the back of a brown wrist wouldn't work.

    This is why I ask the question.
    04-11-2015 03:30 AM
  10. shanghaichica's Avatar
    Yes, but I assume that you work at a hospital or doctor's office. The pulse ox sensor that I've used in those settings goes on the finger tip, which is not brown so it can easily "see" your pulse.

    Using that exact same technology on the back of a brown wrist wouldn't work.

    This is why I ask the question.
    But the finger tip of a person with white skin is not the same colour as a person with darker skin and it still works.
    04-11-2015 03:32 AM
  11. jean15paul's Avatar
    But the finger tip of a person with white skin is not the same colour as a person with darker skin and it still works.
    I disagree. Everyone's finger tips are not the exact same color, but everyone's finger tips is naturally flesh-toned. There very little melanin in finger tips to obscure the view of the instrument into the body. This isn't true on the wrist.
    04-11-2015 03:41 AM
  12. shanghaichica's Avatar
    Either way I'm sure it will work.
    04-11-2015 03:43 AM
  13. jean15paul's Avatar
    Either way I'm sure it will work.
    I hope so.

    Unrelated. Because of your avatar, I feel like I'm disagreeing with Spock, which is not something that a person should normally do.
    kilofoxtrot likes this.
    04-11-2015 03:50 AM
  14. miketko's Avatar
    I feel this thread is a massive troll ha
    04-11-2015 08:12 AM
  15. kilofoxtrot's Avatar
    I hope so.

    Unrelated. Because of your avatar, I feel like I'm disagreeing with Spock, which is not something that a person should normally do.
    I see the logic of your quandary.
    04-11-2015 08:50 AM
  16. metllicamilitia's Avatar
    Let's science then for a sec, infrared see heat not skin. No problem, will work fine.
    04-11-2015 11:13 AM
  17. Guacho's Avatar
    Racegate. =)
    04-11-2015 11:38 AM
  18. Bifurcated's Avatar
    Let's science then for a sec, infrared see heat not skin. No problem, will work fine.
    Where have you found information saying it uses infrared? I've been assuming that the Apple Watch is a photoplethysmogram, which uses LEDs to illuminate in the visible light spectrum.

    Photoplethysmogram - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I've not been able to find any discussion around whether skin color affects accuracy of such devices, but given that they're used in hospitals (those finger-clip HR monitors), I'm going to be pretty confident that they work fine. Would love to hear more though.
    04-11-2015 11:55 AM
  19. metllicamilitia's Avatar
    Where have you found information saying it uses infrared? I've been assuming that the Apple Watch is a photoplethysmogram, which uses LEDs to illuminate in the visible light spectrum.

    Photoplethysmogram - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I've not been able to find any discussion around whether skin color affects accuracy of such devices, but given that they're used in hospitals (those finger-clip HR monitors), I'm going to be pretty confident that they work fine. Would love to hear more though.
    I'm just basing that off the original post that says infrared. I'm not claiming the Apple Watch uses infrared. I don't remember if they said in the keynote what it uses. Sorry for any misunderstanding.
    04-11-2015 11:58 AM
  20. akanne's Avatar
    I think I heard somewhere that the Apple Watch is dual wavelength - green and something else which may be near IR. With regards to skin color it probably works as good or better than the other optical HR bands available because of the dual wavelength design as opposed to other products that use green only.

    It'll be interesting to see how well it handles light leaks which in my experience is the bane of accuracy with optical HR - I've had to wear my Mio Link a lot tighter than I'd like.
    04-11-2015 12:49 PM
  21. tmadsen's Avatar
    Pulse oximeters read through the fingernail, which is why you can't be wearing nail polish for them to accurately read your O2 saturation and pulse.
    04-11-2015 01:49 PM
  22. iEd's Avatar
    According to Apple's website there are other factors can affect a accurate reading or getting a reading at all.
    A person may have to use the monitor as just a gauge.
    I'm sure there will be testing on this by someone once the watch has been out for a while and it can be tested with various skin colors.
    There will also be comparisons with other devices that measure heart rate. At this point it's all speculation until someone does some A+B testing.


    Sent from my iPhone 6 Plus using Tapatalk
    Sammuel1973 and jean15paul like this.
    04-11-2015 02:30 PM
  23. jean15paul's Avatar
    Where have you found information saying it uses infrared? I've been assuming that the Apple Watch is a photoplethysmogram, which uses LEDs to illuminate in the visible light spectrum.

    Photoplethysmogram - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I've not been able to find any discussion around whether skin color affects accuracy of such devices, but given that they're used in hospitals (those finger-clip HR monitors), I'm going to be pretty confident that they work fine. Would love to hear more though.
    I got that from this verge article which says it uses a combination of visible light and infrared. I assume this is accurate. http://www.theverge.com/2014/9/9/612...etect-activity
    Bifurcated likes this.
    04-12-2015 12:18 PM
  24. bdtrader's Avatar
    Here is some info directly from Apple on the heart rate monitor: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204666
    04-12-2015 05:49 PM
  25. XtoEvolution's Avatar
    Why wouldn't it?
    Premium1 likes this.
    04-12-2015 06:22 PM
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