1. perspicacity's Avatar
    I don't see any obvious reason why Apple would disapprove a sleep tracking app, assuming the Watch's sensors would be up to the task. If they are, then customers wanting to use their watch for that purpose could. Yes, they'd have to accommodate their need against the charge time reality, but how practical that would be would be would be driven by times when the watch could be plugged in for charging.
    I believe this is my first forum post. I'm a medical researcher with recent experience in technologies utilised for sleep science. Wearable, multi-function activity trackers are very poor at assessing complex variables of sleep. About all they're good for, regarding sleep assessment, is basic quantitative data (i.e., hours in bed). Based on comparative testing against the rigs of sensors that are required for peer-reviewed sleep science, consumer activity trackers are not only inadequate, but often present false insights.

    You're better off simply manually logging your sleep. iOS's Health app permits this. If you're not under medical supervision and just interested in better sleep via QS (Quantified Self) method, start by logging your sleep in Health app, track your diet and exercise, keep a written journal and analyse after some time.

    Apple didn't include a native sleep tracking app in the Watch because science doesn't support it. Battery life is entirely besides the point. Sleep tracking via a single-appendage, wearable activity band/clip is a gimmick. Use the sensors instead for tracking continuous vigorous movements, otherwise known as exercise.
    Bigeric23 likes this.
    05-07-2015 08:22 AM
  2. bahandi's Avatar
    I do. It's more convenient to lift my wrist to see if I can afford a few more winks. It also acts as a silent alarm since I need to wake up as early as 4am with two little ones in the house.
    05-08-2015 10:39 PM
  3. Bigeric23's Avatar
    I believe this is my first forum post. I'm a medical researcher with recent experience in technologies utilised for sleep science. Wearable, multi-function activity trackers are very poor at assessing complex variables of sleep. About all they're good for, regarding sleep assessment, is basic quantitative data (i.e., hours in bed). Based on comparative testing against the rigs of sensors that are required for peer-reviewed sleep science, consumer activity trackers are not only inadequate, but often present false insights.

    You're better off simply manually logging your sleep. iOS's Health app permits this. If you're not under medical supervision and just interested in better sleep via QS (Quantified Self) method, start by logging your sleep in Health app, track your diet and exercise, keep a written journal and analyse after some time.

    Apple didn't include a native sleep tracking app in the Watch because science doesn't support it. Battery life is entirely besides the point. Sleep tracking via a single-appendage, wearable activity band/clip is a gimmick. Use the sensors instead for tracking continuous vigorous movements, otherwise known as exercise.
    Thank you for providing this information.
    perspicacity likes this.
    05-09-2015 11:53 AM
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