1. E7aug9's Avatar
    suppose I take a drink of my beer or take a hit [from my cigarette], take a bite from my pizza or burger...is my AW going to light up for a glance that was never intended and affect my battery life? Surely my wrist will achieve the same spatial position/angle as a glance many times.
    03-25-2015 05:31 PM
  2. kch50428's Avatar
    Since most/average people wear watches on their non-dominant hand, and the activities you note would be done by most people using their dominant hand, I can't imagine any issue with h-t-m activities.
    Just_Me_D and kilofoxtrot like this.
    03-25-2015 06:18 PM
  3. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Since most/average people wear watches on their non-dominant hand, and the activities you note would be done by most people using their dominant hand, I can't imagine any issue with h-t-m activities.
    Don't forget that we have a generation of people who don't have any connection to watches like prior generations. .......and they probably wouldn't know which wrist to put the watch on traditionally.
    03-25-2015 09:37 PM
  4. kch50428's Avatar
    Don't forget that we have a generation of people who don't have any connection to watches like prior generations. .......and they probably wouldn't know which wrist to put the watch on traditionally.
    Perhaps... But I think there's some bits of nature that nurture can't overcome.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    03-25-2015 09:43 PM
  5. E7aug9's Avatar
    I think you are under-estimating the frequency..like if i have my phone out, it is in my right (dominant) hand--i learned a long time ago how to drink a beer left-handed. No matter, though, I was just curious.

    So...would there a means to tweak the wake-up angles/parameters to broaden or lessen them? The sensors, always on and probably tracking the watches x-y plane position in space...can those be modified?

    Or am I just "out there" with some freaky, meaningless thought?
    03-26-2015 09:01 AM
  6. 21stNow's Avatar
    I think you are under-estimating the frequency..like if i have my phone out, it is in my right (dominant) hand--i learned a long time ago how to drink a beer left-handed. No matter, though, I was just curious.

    So...would there a means to tweak the wake-up angles/parameters to broaden or lessen them? The sensors, always on and probably tracking the watches x-y plane position in space...can those be modified?

    Or am I just "out there" with some freaky, meaningless thought?

    I don't think that it's a meaningless thought. I don't know what the settings options will be for the Apple Watch. I wear the Galaxy Gear. I set the watch not to come on when I raise my wrist when I'm on long drives because I do notice that it runs the battery down. Day-to-day activities shouldn't be a huge problem, but driving for 12 hours while constantly signaling and turning can have an impact.
    03-26-2015 02:52 PM
  7. Highrisedrifter's Avatar
    I wear a watch all day every day.

    Unfortunately, I wear it on my dominant hand due to my old police training for fight situations (using left hand primarily for defence and right hand primarily for attack). This way, the watch is less likely to get hit when (if) I block a blow. I've not been in a fight for many years but old habits die hard. I've tried wearing a watch on my non-dominant left hand and it feels wrong wrong wrong.
    blasted11 likes this.
    03-26-2015 02:59 PM
  8. mikeo007's Avatar
    I'd be interested to see how an Apple watch will handle a scenario like this. I think the sensors will be tuned fairly well, and the result will be the watch likely won't come on for a hand-to-mouth activity in most cases. Smoking a cigarette or taking a drink place your wrist at a certain angle; the software algorithms may be sophisticated enough to pick up these movements.

    An alternative question though, if the watch is using sensors to detect this type of motion, how will it work for instance if you're laying in bed and check your watch? You'll be holding it at an unnatural angle. I'll be interested to see how much of this they were able to account for.
    03-27-2015 09:59 AM
  9. Les74's Avatar
    Hell of a thread title.
    03-27-2015 10:10 AM
  10. iEd's Avatar
    "Notifications on Apple Watch facilitate quick, lightweight interactions for local and remote notifications. These interactions occur in two stages, which are managed by the short-look and long-look interfaces. The short-look interface appears when a local or remote notification first arrives. A short look presents a discreet, minimal amount of information to the userpreserving a degree of privacy. If the wearers wrist is lowered, the short-look interface disappears. The long-look interface appears when the wearers wrist remains raised or when the wearer taps the short-look interface. It provides more detailed information and more functionalityand it must be actively dismissed by the wearer."






    From my iPhone
    03-27-2015 10:47 AM
  11. E7aug9's Avatar
    "Notifications on Apple Watch facilitate quick, lightweight interactions..."

    That just addresses the the Notifications behavior. Wouldn't the watch get lit-up when I hold it at a predefined "viewing angle" regardless of delivery of a notification? That's what I'm curious about...the replication of that viewing angle whilst doing other things--typically exhibited when raising one's hand to the face/mouth, or driving as mentioned earlier--impacting my battery life.
    03-27-2015 11:24 AM
  12. iEd's Avatar
    I see what you mean. I may be wrong but I was assuming that if the display is on and you lower your wrist the display goes off. If the display is for lack of a better term hard set off nothing happens.
    Like putting the iPhone to sleep with the button. As opposed to letting it sleep on its own.
    It's possible if you let the watch sleep on its own raising it activates the display. It you put it to sleep manually raising it does nothing. I don't know I'm just assuming.





    From my iPhone
    03-27-2015 12:15 PM
  13. Dave Marsh's Avatar
    I've also wondered exactly how energetic the action to raise our wrist to activate the display will be. I'm primarily left handed, but when I wore a watch it was on my left wrist. So, as I do things naturally with my left hand will the watch display be essentially on on the time, draining the battery in just a few hours for me? I have no idea. The option remains for me to switch to my less used right wrist, but I'm hoping I won't have to.
    03-28-2015 03:18 AM
  14. iEd's Avatar
    Best thing to do is wait for it to drop and see what deal is.





    From my iPhone
    03-28-2015 08:57 PM
  15. jcsuzeta's Avatar
    Since most/average people wear watches on their non-dominant hand, and the activities you note would be done by most people using their dominant hand, I can't imagine any issue with h-t-m activities.
    I'm both-handed (not to be confused with ambidextrous) and I eat, drink and do lots of other things with either hand. Just depends on what is more convenient or comfortable at the time. This is is a good question. I guess we'll see...
    Sammuel1973 likes this.
    03-30-2015 05:00 PM
  16. dpham00's Avatar
    At least on my LG G Watch, it works fine. It won't activate when eating or drinking. I usually do both with my left hand and my LG G Watch is on my left hand. I suspect that Apple would be similar
    04-08-2015 12:31 PM

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