1. SeanHRCC's Avatar
    So I was discussing the Apple watch with my wife the other day (she really wants one), and we started talking about price. The one she wants is going to be quite pricy (rose gold model), and I began to start going over the possible downsides to this product, and one that jumped out almost immediately and has really made her start rethinking which model she wants...cost vs. future relevancy.

    So normally, if you buy a watch, especially one that might cost thousands of dollars, you would expect said watch to work with very little service and to remain relevant 10-15-20 years from now. Rolex's from the 80's still fetch major league prices, could you expect an Apple watch to retain even a remotely satisfactory value 3-5 years down the road? (much less 5+)

    The technology with be overshadowed almost immediately after release (like any consumer tech), so 2 years from now...will a $1,500 Apple watch even be as usable as it was when purchased? What about 5 years from now, which is usually long past dead time for smart phones...will the watch even function in a way that a person who buys a watch would like it to?

    Sure...basic functions will exist...we can go buy an original iPhone and still use it for basic functionality, but a watch has always served a much longer life span historically. People buy a nice watch with the intention of keeping it...not upgrading after a couple of years.

    This is something that really got me thinking...a watch that enters the quick death consumer market. Scary to think some of them will be SEVERAL thousand dollars.
    Sammuel1973 likes this.
    02-02-2015 04:53 PM
  2. kch50428's Avatar
    Most I've ever spent on a watch was less than $50... I'm not the target market/demographic for the Watch... just like last night's halftime show...
    shief24 likes this.
    02-02-2015 05:00 PM
  3. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    I'm hoping they announce that after you purchase one the internals will be upgradeable. Some kind of Genius Bar swap of the motherboard, memory and processor but you still keep the same exterior.
    kataran likes this.
    02-02-2015 05:04 PM
  4. Algus's Avatar
    The one thing that gives me pause is the long-term viability of the included battery. I wouldn't mind spending several hundred on an electronic watch but 5-7 years down the road it better still be able to last all day on watch face after having been worn every day of those years.
    02-02-2015 06:07 PM
  5. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    I've said from day one that I'm not interested in the  Watch or any other smart watch, and I'm a guy who wears a watch every day, but a smart watch does not appeal to me. Now that Sean has brought up some excellent points, it appeals to me even less than before.
    02-02-2015 06:19 PM
  6. Ledsteplin's Avatar
    The same as what 'D said. Except I don't wear a watch, and haven't in about 30 years. And I'm not about to do so. I don't care if it shows porno flicks, I ain't wearin' it.


    Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5
    hydrogen3 likes this.
    02-02-2015 11:01 PM
  7. Microcosmos's Avatar
    Definitely good points that Apple will have to clear up on launch day. Not deterrents for me in the least. A battery can be expected to last about two years; I don't doubt for a second that the battery will be replaceable. As for the huge cost and investment in a timepiece, I don't think the people who can afford a gold watch are necessarily worried about what their watch will do 20 years from now. For those who can afford a less expensive watch, it's like buying an accessory for your phone like expensive headphones or a custom speaker system. Those things are nice, but rarely are they heirloom pieces. I see the watch as a useful tool that will be nice to have but that will have a maximum lifespan of four to five years if the guts aren't replaceable. And I'm fine with that. I look forward to having a nicer version of the Pebble that's less likely to go belly up, with a better support system if it does.
    02-03-2015 12:36 AM
  8. jmr1015's Avatar
    I might get the Apple Watch, really for no other reason than I've spent that much on a "dumb" regular watch before... So, why not, I suppose.

    That said, I have no real interest in the Apple Watch. Wearables just don't really grab my attention.
    02-03-2015 12:51 AM
  9. Flow39's Avatar
    If the  Watch turns into a 2-year upgrade cycle, I would definitely never buy a watch more pricy than $500. The Apple Watch Sport does everything the other 2 models does and it only cost $350 compared to the estimated $500 for the standard watch and anywhere from $1,000-$5,000 for the Edition. Spending over $1,000 every 2 years on just a Watch is a little too much IMO.
    02-03-2015 01:12 AM
  10. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Great thinking points.
    Sammuel1973 likes this.
    02-03-2015 01:15 AM
  11. kataran's Avatar
    I'm hoping they announce that after you purchase one the internals will be upgradeable. Some kind of Genius Bar swap of the motherboard, memory and processor but you still keep the same exterior.
    This is what I was thinking as well
    02-03-2015 08:16 AM
  12. boovish's Avatar
    Well, they seem to be built to last, with an A5 processor, and since this is the first generation, I think that these might actually go up in value once discontinued, and I doubt that Apple would make something that expensive obsolete so quickly. The iPhones aren't even being made useless yet, and you can use your iPhone 5 with it.
    02-03-2015 08:51 AM
  13. mvpilot172's Avatar
    I'd consider the $350  Watch, but there are many god points here as to why themore expensive models may not survive as a timeless piece of jewelry. Don't forget that an aftermarket for watch bands will probably crop up also. So buy the cheaper one and swap bands out.
    02-03-2015 09:31 AM
  14. Not Quite Right's Avatar
    Sean your approach to this all wrong. This is not jewelry. This is technology that you wear on your wrist. It may come in different levels of trim to satisfy the customers need for fashion, or individuality, but it's functionality is why you purchase it, not because it will hold or increase in value over time. Think of it much like buying a car, the purpose is for transportation, the different levels accessorization depends on how good you want to look while driving it. Not to mention the majority of cars depreciate the second you drive them off the lot, they're not a investment ...
    02-03-2015 12:00 PM
  15. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Sean your approach to this all wrong. This is not jewelry. This is technology that you wear on your wrist. It may come in different levels of trim to satisfy the customers need for fashion, or individuality, but it's functionality is why you purchase it, not because it will hold or increase in value over time. Think of it much like buying a car, the purpose is for transportation, the different levels accessorization depends on how good you want to look while driving it. Not to mention the majority of cars depreciate the second you drive them off the lot, they're not a investment ...
    Anything can, arguably, be an investment. When people purchase computers, they're looking at it from an investment point of view. How many years will it be relevant? Will it do everything I need it to do? Does the cost outweigh its benefits? Heck, paying full price for a smartphone is an investment for some people and many of those people will consider the  Watch an investment. Technology, whether worn on the wrist or not, is still technology, and people are waiting for the  Watch instead of purchasing one of the numerous available smart watches because they want or expect to get the most bang for their buck, a quality product and hopefully, seamless integration with their current Apple products and services. That, in my opinion, is an investment.
    Sammuel1973 likes this.
    02-03-2015 12:15 PM
  16. Not Quite Right's Avatar
    Anything can, arguably, be an investment. When people purchase computers, they're looking at it from an investment point of view. How many years will it be relevant? Will it do everything I need it to do? Does the cost outweigh its benefits? Heck, paying full price for a smartphone is an investment for some people and many of those people will consider the  Watch an investment. Technology, whether worn on the wrist or not, is still technology, and people are waiting for the  Watch instead of purchasing one of the numerous available smart watches because they want or expect to get the most bang for their buck, a quality product and hopefully, seamless integration with their current Apple products and services. That, in my opinion, is an investment.
    DEFINITION OF 'INVESTMENT'
    An asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will generate income or appreciate in the future. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth. In finance, an investment is a monetary asset purchased with the idea that the asset will provide income in the future or appreciate and be sold at a higher price.
    Seriously 'D this is technology, and I can guarantee that it was never purchased to be an "investment"...
    Potentially major draw back for the Apple Watch related to cost...-2d6tzdh.jpg
    02-03-2015 12:28 PM
  17. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    DEFINITION OF 'INVESTMENT'
    An asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will generate income or appreciate in the future. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth. In finance, an investment is a monetary asset purchased with the idea that the asset will provide income in the future or appreciate and be sold at a higher price.
    Seriously 'D this technology, and I can guarantee that it was never purchased to be an "investment"...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    You know exactly what I meant and know exactly the context in which I made my statement, and I stand by it. Whether you want to accept it or not, is irrelevant. The fact still remains that some people will view the purchase of the  Watch as an investment. Period.
    02-03-2015 12:39 PM
  18. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    Don't get me wrong, I understand what you're saying and you're right in that certain things weren't meant to be viewed as an investment, however, some of those items ended up being investments to some people.
    02-03-2015 12:42 PM
  19. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    Sean your approach to this all wrong. This is not jewelry. This is technology that you wear on your wrist. It may come in different levels of trim to satisfy the customers need for fashion, or individuality, but it's functionality is why you purchase it, not because it will hold or increase in value over time. Think of it much like buying a car, the purpose is for transportation, the different levels accessorization depends on how good you want to look while driving it. Not to mention the majority of cars depreciate the second you drive them off the lot, they're not a investment ...
    Yes and no. Yes it is technology. No because Apple is marketing it at least partially as fashion and jewelry. And people do buy expensive Rolex watches expecting them to at least hold their value if not actually appreciate. So it could be seen as an investment at least for the 18 carat gold ones.
    I'm still undecided on getting one, but I understand that it is technology that will be obsolete in a few years. And I would buy it with that in mind. But is Apple going to get hurt by marketing it as fashion/jewelry and the people who buy it with that in mind be disappointed in a few years. Time will tell I guess.
    Just_Me_D likes this.
    02-03-2015 12:50 PM
  20. Haalcyon's Avatar
    I just figured the expensive versions ($500+) were for folks for which the cost is irrelevant. For someone whose $10K to them is like $10 to me a $1500+ Apple Watch may be attractive and make sense. The Apple Watch could never be worth too much more than its competition to me but I realize there's the Apple tax and that is why it cost notably more than, say, a Samsung Gear S or a Moto 360, etc.
    02-03-2015 01:00 PM
  21. Not Quite Right's Avatar
    You know exactly what I meant and know exactly the context in which I made my statement, and I stand by it. Whether you want to accept it or not, is irrelevant. The fact still remains that some people will view the purchase of the  Watch as an investment. Period.
    'D I know you're standing by a statement made with a poor choice of words. Buying a house is an investment, buying stock in Apple is an investment, buying old coins, or antiques is an investment ...
    Never confuse "decision making", "future proofing", or "purchasing" something you can ill afford an investment...
    02-03-2015 01:15 PM
  22. Not Quite Right's Avatar
    I think we should all get a little more familiar with this product ...
    Apple - Apple Watch - Films
    02-03-2015 01:24 PM
  23. kataran's Avatar
    Sean your approach to this all wrong. This is not jewelry. This is technology that you wear on your wrist. It may come in different levels of trim to satisfy the customers need for fashion, or individuality, but it's functionality is why you purchase it, not because it will hold or increase in value over time. Think of it much like buying a car, the purpose is for transportation, the different levels accessorization depends on how good you want to look while driving it. Not to mention the majority of cars depreciate the second you drive them off the lot, they're not a investment ...
    I'll agree to a point in regard to electronics even thou the early Macs were bought for there usage but were retained as an investment by the most savory of the bunch

    But your way off when it comes to cars as an investment. There's a whole culture like Jay Leno that use cars not only as a tax shelter but a major investment
    02-03-2015 03:27 PM
  24. Just_Me_D's Avatar
    'D I know you're standing by a statement made with a poor choice of words. Buying a house is an investment, buying stock in Apple is an investment, buying old coins, or antiques is an investment ...
    Never confuse "decision making", "future proofing", or "purchasing" something you can ill afford an investment...
    You mean like buying a house, buying certain stock as well as old coins or antiques? Those things that many people can ill afford? Okay, got it...
    02-03-2015 03:34 PM
  25. warcraftWidow's Avatar
    I'll agree to a point in regard to electronics even thou the early Macs were bought for there usage but were retained as an investment by the most savory of the bunch.
    I'm guessing this was an auto-correct error, but I was amused by the "savory" bunch of investors.
    kataran likes this.
    02-03-2015 05:13 PM
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