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  1. Thread AuthorThread Author   #1  
    DJ Hellfire's Avatar
    iMore Beginner

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    Default Is there a process manager that tells what apps are running the processes?

    I have a jailbroken 4 and my ram is always really low. Like under 60mb. I thought maybe it was lockinfo, and all the the phone does run a bit smoother on low ram without lockinfo, the ram is still dropping low when I deactivate lockinfo from sbsettings. So I have the System app but it's like reading Chinese. There's a whole list of processes running but I don't know what most of them are or what's running them. Is there an app that tells what is actually using the processes, similar to how windows task manager does?

    And even if I close apps, the ram only goes back up to about 170 and starts to drop back down. If I respring after closing all apps or do a free memory from sb, the ram goes up to 250-300 but then starts to quickly drop back down after a minute even without opening apps.
    Last edited by DJ Hellfire; 09-27-2011 at 09:04 AM.
  2. #2  
    dwfw's Avatar
    iPhone Beginner

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    Sounds like a classic memory leak. If you were ever a BlackBerry user, you should be familiar with that concept.

    I am not aware of any tools for finding the cause or for viewing individual processes in iOS devices.

    From Wikipedia:
    A memory leak, in computer science (or leakage, in this context), occurs when a computer program consumes memory but is unable to release it back to the operating system. In object-oriented programming, a memory leak happens when an object is stored in memory but cannot be accessed by the running code.[1] A memory leak has symptoms similar to a number of other problems (see below) and generally can only be diagnosed by a programmer with access to the program source code; however, many people refer to any unwanted increase in memory usage as a memory leak, though this is not strictly accurate from a technical perspective.

    Because they can exhaust available system memory as an application runs, memory leaks are often the cause or a contributing factor of software aging.

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