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  1. Thread AuthorThread Author   #1  
    DRTigerlilly's Avatar
    iPhone Intermediate

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    Default Overclocking the iPhone 2/3g

    I've been searching around the internet and haven't really come upon anything definitive and am just kind of wondering why/how it hasn't been done before.

    It's done on other platforms, and considering the work that has been done on the phone to date. How hard would it be to overclock the iphone, since they're 600Mhz processors underclocked to 400Mhz.

    and does anyone have definitive info?

    I've seen talk of editing a plist file and another re running a command in terminal "sysctl -w hw.cpufrequency=533000000" it apparently worked on older firmware, but has since been made read only.

    I'm aware there would be a decrease in battery life, run warmer etc not particularly interested in those comments, i think the tradeoff for a snappier phone and less waiting is fair.

    So if anyone has DEFINITIVE information or ideas. I'm all ears.
    Last edited by DRTigerlilly; 01-23-2010 at 08:04 AM.
  2. #2  
    flyingember's Avatar
    iPhone Elite

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    if it was possible it would have been done by now and you would be finding information. that cpufrequency command is a OS X command that I only found reference to as a way to get the frequency on laptops.

    if doable your trade-off would not be a loss of battery life but a loss in number of months you could use the phone. the iphone is so dense you would be heating up multiple components including the flash memory, screen, etc and decreasing their life. imagine losing random data off the phone and one day the entire device just corrupts and you lose everything

    also, with the iphone most of your waiting is due to the RAM or lack of it. Apple increased the speed of the 3GS mainly because they doubled it. A cpu increase would actually do extremely little in terms of real speed increases. this has been true in computing for about 5 years now. SSD disks and faster RAM are the areas computers have improved the most in recent years.

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